Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (2024)

Resources: Poetics & Pedagogy

Compiled by Joshua Marie Wilkinson, with Alexis Almeida, Charles Gabel, & Ben Rutherfurd, the following lists present bibliographies of print materials related to poetry, poetics, and the teaching of poetry. While the lists are not in any way comprehensive, we welcome additions, corrections, suggestions, and questions at:

thevoltaeditors |at| gmail |dot| com

Put simply, it’s a work in progress—flawed & developing—but we hope you find it useful.

—JMW, Tucson, AZ (Last updated July 31, 2015)

    Poetics Essays Poetics Collections by Individual PoetsPoetics Anthologies Poetry Anthologies with Poetics Sections Interviews with Individual Poets in Print Anthologies of Interviews / Conversations with Poets Books on Teaching Poetry Content-Based Writing Prompts Formal Writing Prompts Traditional Poetry Forms Additional Resources for Teaching Poetry

Poetics Essays

“The name of Poetics seems appropriate to such a study if we take the word in its etymological sense, that is, as a name for everything that bears on the creation or composition of works having language at once as their substance and as their instrument—and not in the restricted sense of a collection of aesthetic rules or precepts relating to poetry” (Valéry, qtd in Todorov’s Introduction to Poetics, 7).

Abrahms, M.H. "The Lyric as Poetic Norm." The Lyric Theory Reader: A Critical Anthology. Ed. Virginia Jackson and Yopie Prins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014. 140-143. "The lyric form--used here to include elegy, song, sonnet, and ode--had long been particularly connected by critics to the state of mind of its author" (140).

Abu-Lughod, Lila. “Shifting Politics in Bedouin Love Poetry.” Poetry and Cultural Studies: A Reader. Edited by Maria Damon and Ira Livingston. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2009. 116-132. "The Bedouins I lived and worked with in Egypt would find the command to confess one's feelings strange—on the one hand improper and undignified, and on the other, as will become clear, nonsensical" (116).

Achebe, Chinua. Illumination: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 3. "Given the great gulf between being and knowing, between his essence and existence, man has no choice really but to make and believe in some fiction" (3).

Acker, Kathy. “Ugly.” A Guide to Poetics Journal: Writing in the Expanded Field 1982-1998. Ed. Lyn Hejinian & Barrett Watten. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2013. 177-184. “In the face of suicide, in the face of those living corpses who are trying to drag us into their own suicides, in the faces of those old men, there seem to be two strategies: One is a pure act of wil. To bang one's head against a wall...The second strategy wasn't exactly one of will. The heads, being broken, gave up” (177).

Ackerman, Diane. “What a Poem Knows.” The McGraw Hill Book of Poetry. Edited by Robert DiYanni and Kraft Rompf. New York: McGraw Hill, 1993. 1174-1175. “A poem tells us about the subtleties of mood for which we have no labels” (1174).

Adonis. “from ‘Preface.’” Poems for the Millennium: The University of California Book of Modern & Postmodern Poetry. Volume Two: From Postwar to Millennium. Ed. Jerome Rothenberg and Pierre Joris. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998. 441-443. “Being a poet means that I have already written but that I have actually written nothing. Poetry is an act without beginning or an end. It is really a promise of a beginning, a perpetual beginning” (443).

Adco*ck, Fleur. “Not Quite a Statement.” Strong Words: Modern Poets on Modern Poetry. Edited by W.N. Herbert and Matthew Hollis. Northumberland: Bloodaxe, 2000. 198-200. "So there are poems and non-poems. But there is also a third category: ex-poems. Never underestimate the dread influence of fashion--look at back numbers of literary magazines, or faded volumes in libraries: ex-poems everywhere" (198).

Adorno, Theodor W. “On Lyric Poetry and Society.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004. 342-349. “As the contradiction between poetic and communicative language reached an extreme, lyric poetry became a game in which one goes for broke; not, as philistine opinion would have it, because it had become incomprehensible but because in acquiring self-consciousness as a literary language, in striving for an absolute objectivity unrestricted by any considerations of communication, language both distances itself from the objectivity of spirit, of living language, and substitutes a poetic event for a language that is no longer present” (348).

Afaq, Maryam. “Race, Feminism, and Creative Spaces.” The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. Ed. Claudia Rankine, Beth Loffreda, & Max King Cap. Albany, NY: Fence Books, 2015. 49-52.

---. “Two Essays on Poetry and Society.” ["Lyric Poetry and Society" and "Cultural Criticism and Society"] Poetry and Cultural Studies: A Reader. Edited by Maria Damon and Ira Livingston. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2009. 25-36. "Lyric poetry is not to be deduced from society; its social content is precisely its sponteneity, which does not follow from the conditions of the moment" (29).

Agamben, Giorgio. "The End of the Poem." The Lyric Theory Reader: A Critical Anthology. Ed. Virginia Jackson and Yopie Prins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014. 430-434. "poetry lives only in the tension and difference (and hence also in the virtual interference) between sound and sense, between the semiotic sphere and the semantic sphere" (430).

Aiken, Conrad. “Poetry and the Mind of Modern Man.” Poets on Poetry. Ed. Howard Nemerov. New York: Basic Books, 1966. 1-7. “The poet is only the medium” (6).

Akhmatova, Anna. Illumination: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 5. "'Can you describe this?' / And I answered: 'Yes, I can'" (5).

Alcalá, Rosa. Untitled Poetics Statement. The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 1-2. "The poet's voice may activate the poem, but then the poem acquires, through this activation, its own voice" (1).

Albert-Birot, Pierre. “The Sun Is in the Staircase.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001. 115. “The Sun / Is In The Staircase // For Information / Contact The Wine Merchant / Down The Road” (115).

---. “Banality.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001. 143. “Does our time resemble that of our parents? No. So let’s do as each people has done in each period of time, LET’S BE MODERN; let our works be the expression of the time in which they were born, these works alone are living, ALL THE OTHERS ARE ARTIFICIAL / TO EACH TIME ITS ART” (143).

---. “Ca ne se fait pas (It isn’t done).” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001. 144-145. “But now France awakened / KNOWS / that everything ‘THAT ISN’T DONE’ / CAN BE DONE / and will BE DONE” (145).

---. “L’Esprit moderne (The modern spirit).” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001. 146-147. “THE MODERN SPIRIT / SLUGGARDS! / Are you convinced?” (147).

---. “La Loi (The law).” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001. 148-149. “DOWN WITH THE OLD / It’s dirty / It stinks / IT SMELLS LIKE DEATH” (149).

---. “Nunic Dialogue: Z and A in Front of Modern Paintings.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001. 149-150. “Z. What’s the problem? A. Everything! I don’t see anything I recognize” (149).

---. “Nunism.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001. 150. “All of us who are seeking something, let’s be nunists first” (150).

---. “Pas de corset! (No girdle!).” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001. 151. “Really you Nunists, you are taking us straight to anarchy, the way you keep upsetting our rules: you forget it takes a girdle to stop everything sliding and spilling over” (151).

Aldington, R. and others. “Beyond Action and Reaction.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001. 340-341. “To believe that it is necessary for or conducive to art, to ‘Improve’ life, for instance—make architecture, dress, ornament, in ‘better taste,’ is absurd” (341).

---. “Our Vortex.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001. 342-343. “We are proud, handsome and predatory. / We hunt machines, they are our favourite game. / We invent them and then hunt them down. / This is a great Vorticist age, a great still age of artists” (343).

Aleshire, Joan. “Staying News: A Defense of the Lyric.” After Confession: Poetry as Autobiography. Saint Paul: Graywolf Press, 2001. 14-37. "In the confessional poem, as I'd like to define it, the poet, overwhelmed or intoxicated by the facts of his or her life, lets the facts take over" (16).

Alexander, Christopher. “The Timeless Way of Building (excerpt).” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001. 657-660. “Indeed this ageless character has nothing, in the end, to do with languages. The language, and the processes which stem from it, merely release the fundamental order which is native to us. They do not teach us, they only remind us of what we know already, and of what we shall discover time and time again, when we give up our ideas and opinions, and do exactly what emerges from ourselves” (660).

Alexander, Will. “Alchemy as Poetic Kindling.” A Poetics of Criticism. Edited by Juliana Spahr, Mark Wallace, Kristin Prevallet, and Pam Rehm. Buffalo: Leave Books, 1994. 173-177. "Poetry being the language of concentration through destiny" (173).

Alferi, Pierre. “Seeking a Sentence.” A Guide to Poetics Journal: Writing in the Expanded Field 1982-1998. Ed. Lyn Hejinian & Barrett Watten. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2013. 303-312. "An experience begins with the apparition of a thing and the first usage of a word" (309).

Algarin, Miguel. “Volume and Value of the Breath in Poetry.” Talking Poetics from Naropa Institute: Annals of the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics. Volume Two. Ed. Anne Waldman and Marilyn Webb. Boulder: Shambhala, 1978. 325-345. “The way that the poet makes himself responsible for teaching the people how to think about themselves, and hot to put time out for thinking about themselves, is for him to do it, and do it aloud, and do it where people will hear him. It’s a responsibility that all poets have” (328).

---. “Nuyorican Language.” Poetry and Cultural Studies: A Reader. Edited by Maria Damon and Ira Livingston. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2009. 437-445. "The poet blazes a path of fire for the self. He juggles with words. He lives risking each moment" (438).

Ali, Agha Shahid. Untitled essay on an Ars Poetica. What Will Suffice: Contemporary American Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Christopher Buckley and Christopher Merrill. Salt Lake City: Gibbs Smith, 1997. 1-2. “And my poetics? Lover and beloved at once, witness of three worlds, each, from the beginning, mine: Hindu, Islamic, and Western. These I distill in exile” (2).

Ali, Kazim. “On the Line.” A Broken Thing: Poets on the Line. Ed. Emily Rosko and Anton Vander Zee. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2011. 35-39. “By discrete moments, little swabs, a life can appear” (38).

Alighieri, Dante. Illumination: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 7. "Then I said: 'If I could detain them for a little while, I would surely make them weep before they left, for I would say things which would reduce to tears everyone who heard me'" (7).

Altieri, Charles. “Reading for Affect in the Lyric…” Poetry & Pedagogy: The Challenge of the Contemporary. Ed. Joan Retallack and Juliana Spahr. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2006. "Poems matter for the intentionality they construct rather than for the intentions they exhibit. Intentions project what the author might have meant. Intentionality, on the othe hand, allows us to explore how a world is composed for consciousness" (40).

---. "What Is Living and What Is Dead in American Postmodernism: Establishing the Conemporaneity of Some American Poets." The Lyric Theory Reader: A Critical Anthology. Ed. Virginia Jackson and Yopie Prins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014. 477-487. "Poetry becomes direct habitation, a directly instrumental rather than contemplative use of language" (477).

Alvarez, Julia. “So Much Depends.” Twentieth-Century American Poetics: Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Dana Gioia, David Mason, and Meg Scho*rke. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2004. 432-436. “Still, I get nervous when people ask me to define myself as a writer. I hear the cage of a definition close around me with its ‘Latino subject matter,’ ‘Latino style,’ ‘Latino concerns.’ I find that the best way to define myself is through the stories and poems that do not limit me to a simple label, a choice” (436).

Amichai, Yehuda. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 9. "There seems at times almost to be no difference and, as often happens in the Biblical texts, the future tense is used to describe something that happened in the past. This sense of bringing the past and future into the present defines my sense of time--it is very strong within me and my poetry" (9).

Ammons, A.R. “A Poem Is a Walk.” Claims for Poetry. Ed. Donald Hall. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000. 1-8. “I can’t tell you where a poem comes from, what it is, or what it is for: nor can any other man. The reason I can’t tell you is that the purpose of a poem is to go past telling, to be recognized by burning” (1).

---. Untitled Essay on a poem. Ecstatic Occasions, Expedient Forms: 85 Leading Contemporary Poets Select and Comment on Their Poems. Ed. David Lehman. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2001. 1-2. “The danger is that arbitrary forms may be boringly clever compensations for a lack of native force, boxes to be filled with crushed material, boxes which may be taken to exhaust the unlimited existences inventive prosody can find to station the arbitrary in the work of art” (1).

Anderson, Jon. Untitled essay on a poem. Fifty Contemporary Poets: The Creative Process. Ed. Alberta T. Turner. New York: David McKay Co., 1977. “For some time I’d felt I had to put my safety at stake in every poem, to use poetry as an approach to those fatal elements of character I most feared in myself. The motive made possible better poems, but it accented my attention toward those fears. I decided to watch television” (37).

Andrews, Bruce. “Misrepresentation.” In the American Tree. Ed. Ron Silliman. Orono, ME: National Poetry Foundation, 1986. 496-503. "Isn't transparency a mark of illusion, and possibly of all illusions?" (499).

---. with James Sherry, Barret Watten, Erica Hunt, Andrew Levy, Nick Lawrence, Jackson Mac Low, Jeffrey Jullich, and Sally Silvers. “Poetry as Explanation…” The Politics of Poetic Form: Poetry and Public Policy. Ed. Charles Bernstein. New York: Roof Books, 1998. 23-43. “There is no ‘direct treatment’ of the thing possible, except of the ‘things’ of language. Crystalline purity—or transparency—will not be found in words. That classical ideal is an illusion—one which recommends that we repress the process of production or cast our glance away from it” (24-25).

---. “Text and Context.” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984. 31-38. “Language is the center, the primary material, the sacred corpus, the primum mobile, the erotic sense of its own shared reality. Not a separate but a distinguishing reality” (31).

---. “Code Words.” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984. 54-56. “We can imagine writing that does not prepare the ego for the terrors and routines of a society it takes for granted” (54).

---. “Writing Social Work & Political Practice.” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984. 133. “Writing doesn’t need to satisfy itself with pulverizing relations & discharging excess. It can charge material with possibilities of meaning—not by demolishing relations but creating them, no holds barred, among units of language (even when these seem superficially like a pulverized normality)” (136).

---. “Reading Notes.” Contemporary Poetics. Ed. Louis Armand. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2007. 197-207. “Radical texts solicit a nonsequential production or remaking of sense…”(201).

---. “Lost and Found.” Contemporary Poetics. Ed. Louis Armand. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2007. 208-210. “This is nonfilter, the aisles of units fully formed – “something we can all feel / good about abandoning.’ ‘A through-and-through.’ ‘A view-finger, that’s what’s missing.’” (208).

---. “Reading Lines Linear How to Mean.” A Broken Thing: Poets on the Line. Ed. Emily Rosko and Anton Vander Zee. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2011. 40-43. “First: the line can be an obstacle, a straightening barrier to experience’s full efflorescence” (40).

---. “Total Equals What: Poetics and Praxis.” A Guide to Poetics Journal: Writing in the Expanded Field 1982-1998. Ed. Lyn Hejinian & Barrett Watten. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2013. 185-196. “That language, being social, being socially constructed, suggests that what's not possible is a condition of transparency or prsence or the aura. Because meaning isn't naturally refelected in language; language is producing it actively. THere isn't a natural or automatic possibility of presence. This ends up being a dream, an illusion of satisfaction. Instead you have absence, displacement, the erosion of the aura” (186-187).

Andrews, Tom. Untitled essay on an Ars Poetica. What Will Suffice: Contemporary American Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Christopher Buckley and Christopher Merrill. Salt Lake City: Gibbs Smith, 1997. 2. “Invariably I find that if I insist on my original design, then ‘I lose something in the original.’ Increasingly I’m interested in letting my poems…engage directly this tension between my own desire to speak and the language’s tendency to displace the speaker. The more I write, the more I discover the truth of something Michel Foucault wrote: ‘Language always seems to be inhabited by the other, the elsewhere, the distant’” (2).

Antheil, George. “Abstraction an Time in Music.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001. 650-652. “The GREATEST ARTIST should be he who is able to bring out of THIS special and THAT special material, the finest forms that lay inert and potent in that material” (651).

Antin, David. “what it means to be avant-garde.” Artifice & Indeterminacy: An Anthology of New Poetics. Ed. Christopher Beach. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1998. 109-129. “but maybe that the problem / with the notion of the avant-garde / that it turns itself from a discourse into a tradition / whose members worry about its decline in a threatening future / and maybe that’s why I’m such a poor avant-gardist / because i’m mainly concerned with the present” (120-121).

Anzaldúa, Gloria. “Borderlands/La Frontera (excerpt).” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001. 614-618. “The ability to respond is what is meant by responsibility, yet our cultures take away our ability to act—shackles us in the name of protection. Blocked, immobilized, we can’t move forward, can’t move backwards, That writhing serpent movement, the very movement of life, swifter than lightning, frozen” (615).

---. “Tradition of the Shaman.” Conversant Essays: Contemporary Poets on Poetry. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1990. 99-100. "I realize that I was trying to practice the oldest 'calling' in the world--chamanism. And that I was practicing it in a new way. The Sanskrit word for shaman, saman, means 'song'"(99).

Apollinaire, Guillaume. “The New Spirit and the Poets.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004. 75-82. “When a modern poet notes in several lines the throbbing sound of an airplane, it must be regarded above all as the desire of the poet to accustom his sensibility to reality. His passion for truth impels him to take almost scientific notes which, if he wishes to present them as poems, have the faults of being trompe-oreilles so to speak, to which actuality will always be superior” (78).

---. “Picasso.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001. 115-120. “His insistence on the pursuit of beauty has since changed everything in art” (117).

---. “The New Painting: Art Notes.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001. 120-123. “One could give the following definition of art: creation of new illusions. Indeed, everything we feel is only illusion, and the function of the artist is to modify the illusions of the public in accordance with his own creation” (121).

---. “Cubism Differs.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001. 123-125. “Cubism differs from the old schools of painting in that it aims, not at an art of imitation, but at an art of conception, which tends to rise to the height of creation” (123).

---. “Horse Calligram.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001. 126. “to be sensitive to poetry for it dominates / all dreadfully” (126).

---. “The Little Car.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001. 129-130. “We understood my buddy and I / That the little car had taken us into a New epoch / And although we were both grown men / We had just been born” (130).

Aragón, Francisco. “And Here He Comes Smiling Intending No Harm: A Poetics of Invisible.” The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. Ed. Claudia Rankine, Beth Loffreda, & Max King Cap. Albany, NY: Fence Books, 2015. 185-195.

Archambeau, Robert. “The Discursive Situation of Poetry.” The Monkey & The Wrench: Essays Into Contemporary Poetics. Akron, OH: University of Akron Press, 2011. 5-26. “As even this brief and incomplete survey of writers makes clear, American poets have noted the decline of the audience for poetry, and found it troubling. But when decriers of the decline make MFA programs their whipping boy they misunderstand the role such programs play in the distancing of poet from audience. In fact, poetry’s decline of popularity predates the rise of writing programs, and such programs are properly seen as the latest episode in a larger and long-enduring drama, a drama that began in the nineteenth century” (9).

Aristotle. The Poetics (complete). Criticism: Major Statements. Ed. Charles Kaplan & William Anderson. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1991. 21-53. “The poet and the historian differ not by writing in verse or in prose. The work of Herodotus might be put into verse, and it would still be a species of history, with metre no less than without it. The true difference is that one relates what has happened, the other what may happen. Poetry, therefore, is a more philosophical and a higher thing than history: for poetry tends to express the universal, history the particular” (30).

Armand, Louis. “Strange Attractions: Technopoetics in the Vortex.” Contemporary Poetics. Ed. Louis Armand. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2007. 293-320. “The ideas of repetition, generative constraint, and probability bring into a focus a fundamental characteristic of hypertext—that of the transversal. Transversality might be thought of as a particular kind of punctuation or puncturing (bifurcations, ruptures, discontinuities, cancellations), suggestive of a network of what Marc Augé calls ‘non places’ and What Hélène Cixous refers to as ‘a metonymic chain where the other place always has its other place’—a ‘zero of dimension’ or punctum between what has previously been thought of as the ‘inside’ and ‘outside’ of language” (296).

Armantrout, Rae. “‘Why Don’t Women Do Language-Oriented Writing?’” In the American Tree. Ed. Ron Silliman. Orono, ME: National Poetry Foundation, 1986. 518-520. "To believe non-referentiality is possible is to believe language can be divorced from thought, words from their histories" (518).

---. “Cheshire Poetics.” American Women Poets in the 21st Century. Edited by Claudia Rankine and Juliana Spahr. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2002. 24-26. “It’s a Cheshire poetics, one that points two ways then vanishes in the blur of what is seen and what is seeing, what can be known and what it is to know. That double bind” (24).

---. “Feminist Poetics and the Meaning of Clarity.” Artifice & Indeterminacy: An Anthology of New Poetics. Ed. Christopher Beach. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1998. 287-296. “The question of how best to represent women’s social position remained open, and…I didn’t believe that women had ever shown a marked preference for writing poetry of an easily readable, because conventional, kind. From Dickinson to Stein to Riding-Jackson to the women I discussed in that 1978 essay (Susan Howe, Carla Harryman, and Lyn Hejinian), American women have been radical innovators” (287).

---. “Mainstream Marginality.” A Guide to Poetics Journal: Writing in the Expanded Field 1982-1998. Ed. Lyn Hejinian & Barrett Watten. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2013. 197-201. "It is perfectly legitimate, of course, for Smith and Bottoms to choose the poets they prefer for an anthology. It is illegitimate, owever, for them to obscure the nature of the choices they've made and pretend that other tendencie do not exist in contemporary American poetry. It is disinenuous for them to pretend that their book created itself by means of a kind of natural selection while they stood back and watched 'language discover its possibilities.' As usual, it is worthwhile to examine claims to naturalness and objectivity carefully to find out what or who is being suppressed" (201).

Arnold, Matthew. “The Study of Poetry.” Criticism: Major Statements. Ed. Charles Kaplan & William Anderson. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1991. 357-380. “The best poetry is what we want; the best poetry will be found to have a power of forming, sustaining, and delighting us, as nothing else can. A clearer, deeper sense of the best in poetry, and of the strength and joy to be drawn from it, is the most precious benefit which we can gather from a poetical collection such as the present” (360).

---. “On Translating Homer.” The Prelude to Poetry: The English Poets in Defence and Praise of Their Own Art. Ed. Ernest Rhys. London: J.M. Dent, 1927. 275-284. “So the translator really has no good model before him for any part of his work, and has to invent everything for himself. He is to be rapid in movement, plain in speech, simple in thought, and noble” (276).

Arp, Jean (Hans). “Manifesto of the Dada Crocodarium.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001. 292. “long live DADA” (292).

---. “The Elephant Style versus the Bidet Style.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001. 292-293. “Rational architecture was repressed aesthetics” (292).

---. “Infinite Millimeter Manifesto.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001. 293. “we have to first let forms, colors, words, sounds grow / and then explain them” (293).

---. “Concrete Art.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001. 524. “Concrete art is a basic art, a sane and natural art that grows the stars of peace, love, and poetry in the head and in the heart” (524).

--- and others. “Poetry Is Vertical.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001. 529. “The final disintegration of the ‘I’ in the creative act is made possible by the use of a language which is a mantic instrument, and which does not hesitate to adopt a revolutionary attitude toward word and syntax, going even so far as to invent a hermetic language, if necessary” (529).

Artaud, Antonin. “The Theatre of Cruelty: First Manifesto.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001. 451-459. “Neither Humor, nor Poetry, nor Imagination means anything unless, by an anarchic destruction generating a fantastic flight of forms which ill constitute the whole spectacle, they succeed in organically calling into question man, his ideas about reality, and his poetic place in reality” (453).

---. “All Writing Is Pigsh*t.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001. 460-461. “The whole literary scene is a pigpen, especially this one” (460).

---. “Here Where Others…” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001. 462. “I want to make a Book that will derange men, that will be like an open door leading them where they would never have consented to go. A door simply ajar on reality” (462).

---. “Revolt against Poetry.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001. 463-464. “The unconscious producer of our selves is that of an ancient copulator who frees himself to commit more vulgar magicks, and who has pulled off the most infamous wizardry by having brought himself back to his self-same self over and above his very self, eternally, so that he was able even to pull a word out of a cadaver” (464).

---. “sh*t to the Spirit.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001. 464-470. “A nightmare never is an accident, but an evil fastened on to us by a whor*, by the mouth of a ghoul of a whor* who finds us too rich with life, and so creates by very exact slurps some interferences in our thought, some catastrophic voids in the passage of the breath of our sleeping body, which believes itself free from care” (467).

---. “Spell for Leon Fouks.” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 226-227.

Ashbery, John. “The Invisible Avant-Garde.” Twentieth-Century American Poetics: Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Dana Gioia, David Mason, and Meg Scho*rke. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2004. 287-291. “To experiment was to have the feeling that one was poised on some outermost brink. In other words if one wanted to depart, even moderately, from the norm, one was taking one’s life—one’s life as an artist—into one’s hands” (288).

---. Untitled Essay on a poem. Ecstatic Occasions, Expedient Forms: 85 Leading Contemporary Poets Select and Comment on Their Poems. Ed. David Lehman. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2001. 2-4. “These restraints [pantoums] seem to have a paradoxically liberating effect, for me at least” (4).

---. “Respect for Things as They Are.” Poets on Painters: Essays on the Art of Painting by Twentieth-Century Poets. Edited by J.D. McClatchy. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988. 247-254. "For, the more one looks at them, the less the paintings seem celebrations of atmosphere and moments but, rather, strong, contentious, and thorny. He painted his surrounds as they looked, and they happened to look cozy. But the coziness is deceiving" (254).

Asuncion, Hossannah. “Open Letter.” The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. Ed. Claudia Rankine, Beth Loffreda, & Max King Cap. Albany, NY: Fence Books, 2015. 256.

Atwood, Margaret. “Poetic Process?” A Field Guide to Contemporary Poetry and Poetics. Revised Edition. Ed. Stuart Friebert, David Walker, and David Young. Oberlin, OH: Oberlin College Press, 1997. 21. “I don’t want to know how I write poetry. Poetry is dangerous: talking too much about it, like naming your gods, brings bad luck. I believe that most poets will go to almost any lengths to conceal their own reluctant, scanty insights both from others and from themselves. Paying attention to how you do it is like stopping in the middle of any other totally involving and pleasurable activity to observe yourself suspended in the fatal inner mirror: you may improve your so-called technique, but only at the expense of your so-called soul” (21).

Auden, W.H. “Writing.” The Poet’s Work. Ed. Reginald Gibbons. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1979. 240-253. “The poet who writes ‘free’ verse is like Robinson Crusoe on his desert island: he must do all his cooking, laundry, and darning for himself. In a few exceptional cases, this manly independence produces something original and impressive, but more often the result is squalor&–dirty sheets on the unmade bed and empty bottles on the unswept floor” (249).

“Poetry is not magic. Insofar as poetry, or any other of the arts, can be said to have an ulterior purpose, it is, by telling the truth, to disenchant and disintoxicate” (253).

---. “The Poet and the City.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004. 377-384. “[A] poem which was really like a political democracy&–examples, unfortunately, exist&amp–would be formless, windy, banal and utterly boring…” (383).

---. “from The Virgin and the Dynamo.” 20th Century Poetry & Poetics. Fourth Edition. Ed. Gary Geddes. Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996. 790-794. “A poem may be described as being written in iambic pentameters, but if every foot in every line were identical, the poem would sound intolerable to the ear. I am sometimes inclined to think that the aversion of many modern poets and their readers to formal verse may be due to their association of regular repetition and formal restrictions with all that is most boring and lifeless in modern life, road drills, time-clock punching, bureaucratic regulations” (791).

---. “Calm Even in the Catastrophe.” Poets on Painters: Essays on the Art of Painting by Twentieth-Century Poets. Edited by J.D. McClatchy. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988. 127-137. "Van Gogh's letters are not art in this sense, but human documents; what makes them great letters is the absolute self-honesty and nobility of the writer" (128).

---. From “The Enchafed Flood: The Artist as Don Quixote.” Prose Keys to Modern Poetry. Edited by Karl Shapiro. Evanston: Row Peterson & Co., 1962. 200-203. "we are far more likely to become cowards in the face of the tyrant who would compel us to lie in the service of the False City" (202).

Bakhtin, Mikhail. "The Problem of Speech Genres." The Lyric Theory Reader: A Critical Anthology. Ed. Virginia Jackson and Yopie Prins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014. 224-234. "One might say that grammar and stylistics converge and diverge in any concrete language phenomenon" (228).

Balestrini, Nanni and others. “Manifesto of Naples.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001. 663. "Abstraction is not art but merely a philosophical and conventional concept" (663).

Balla, Giacomo. “Futurist Manifesto of Men’s Clothing 1913.” Futurist Manifestos. Edited by Umbro Appolonio. Boston: Artworks, 2001. 132-134. "We must invent Futurist clothes, hap-hap-hap-hap-happy clothes, daring clothes with brilliant colours and dynamic lines" (132).

---. “The Late Balla – Futurist Balla 1915.” Futurist Manifestos. Edited by Umbro Appolonio. Boston: Artworks, 2001. 206. "With the perfecting of photography, static traditionalist painting has completely fallen from repute; photography kills static contemplation" (206).

---. “The Futurist Universe 1918.” Futurist Manifestos. Edited by Umbro Appolonio. Boston: Artworks, 2001. 219. "A typewriter is more architectural than all those building projects which win prizes at academies and competitions" (219).

--- and Forunato Depero. “Futurist Reconstruction of the Universe 1915.” Futurist Manifestos. Edited by Umbro Appolonio. Boston: Artworks, 2001. 197-200. "We will give skeleton and flesh to the invisible, the implalpable, the imponderable and the imperceptible" (197).

Bang, Mary Jo. “Poetics Statement.” Eleven More American Women Poets in the 21st Century: Poetics Across North America. Ed. Claudia Rankine & Lisa Sewell. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2012. 30-33. "poetry rests on the assumption that language is unstable..." (31).

Banias, Ari. “What Do We See? What Do We Not See?” The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. Ed. Claudia Rankine, Beth Loffreda, & Max King Cap. Albany, NY: Fence Books, 2015. 37-42.

Bar-Nadav, Hadara. “The Poem as Canvas: Interdisciplinary Pedagogies.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010. "Similar to a painting class, I claim the poetry workshop as a creative art-making space" (68-69).

Baraka, Amiri. “How You Sound??” The New American Poetry 1945-1960. Ed. Donald Allen. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2000. 424. "I make a poetry with what I feel is useful & can be saved out of all the garbage of our lives" (424).

---. “Hunting Is Not Those Heads on the Wall.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004. 385-389. "Thought is more important than art. Without thought, art ould certainly not exist" (386).

---. “State/Meant.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004. 388-389. "The Black Artist's role in America is to aid in the destruction of America as he knows it" (388).

---. “Expressive Language.” The Poetics of The New American Poetry. Edited by Donald Allen and Warren Tallman. New York: Grove Press, 1973. 373-382. "Words' meanings, but also the rhythm and syntax that frame and prpel their concatenation, seek their culture as the final reference for what they are describing of the world" (375).

---. “Pulling it Down or the Good Manners of Vampires.” Beats at Naropa. Ed. Anne Waldman and Laura Wright. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2009. 39-44. "But as the intellectual reserve of the greatest superpower in existence today, we have an obligation. That obligation is to pull this motherf*cker down" (43).

---. “Lecture.” Civil Disobediences: Poetics and Politics in Action. Ed. Anne Waldman and Lisa Birman. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2004. 294-300. "The language is created by people together" (299).

Barbiero, Daniel. “Avant-Garde without Agonism?” Telling It Slant: Avant-Garde Poetics of the 1990s. Ed. Mark Wallace & Steven Marks. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2001. 79-94. "agonism is the attitude of tension between an emerging experimentalist or group of experimentalists and those tendencies, whether or not they are (or were) avant-garde, that are taken to define the situation in which those experimentalists find themselves" (80).

Barg, Barbara. “20 Questions.” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984. 136-138. "Which of the following communicates its meanings most directly and exactly?" (136).

Barnes, Djuna. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 11. "You composed a sonata, and it turns into a march, a gallop, an attack. It was to have been a garden, and it is a battlefield, it was to have been the moonlight and it is the sun..." (11).

Barthes, Roland. “Is There Any Poetic Writing?” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004. 301-306. "The poetic vocabulary itself is one of usage, not of invention: images in it are recognizable in a body; they do not exist in isolation; they are due to long custom, not to individual creation. The function of the classical poet is not therefore to find new words, with more body or more brilliance, but to follow the order of an ancient ritual, to perfect the symmetry or the conciseness of a relation, to bring a thought exactly within the compass of a metre" (303).

---. “The Written Face.” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 311-312.

Baudelaire, Charles. “The Painter of Modern Life, Parts 1-4.” Toward the Open Field: Poets on the Art of Poetry 1800-1950. Ed. Melissa Kwasny. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2004. 131-144. "Modernity is that which is ephemeral, fugitive, contingent upon the occasion; it is half of art, whose other half is the eternal and unchageable" (142).

---. Notes from “Intimate Journals.” Prose Keys to Modern Poetry. Edited by Karl Shapiro. Evanston: Row Peterson & Co., 1962. 35-37. "Let us beware of the rabble, of common-sense, good-nature, inspiration, and evidence" (36).

---. from “The Flowers of Evil: Three Drafts of a Preface.” Prose Keys to Modern Poetry. Edited by Karl Shapiro. Evanston: Row Peterson & Co., 1962. 31-35. "The poet is of no party. Otherwise, he would be a mere mortal" (32).

Baus, Eric. Untitled Poetics Statement. The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 9-10. "In my poems, I want to point to the stitch at the same time I keep the people in focus" (10).

Beachy-Quick, Dan. “Artist’s Statement.” The Iowa Anthology of New American Poetries. Ed. by Reginald Shepherd. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2004. 1-2. "The confusion between heart and mind is, to some degree, equivalent to Keats's negative capability. Yes, it denies an 'irritable reaching after fact and reason.' But more, it offers the radical assumption that form does not simply exist as form, but rather, the poet's mind pulses, the poet's heart thinks" (1).

---. “A Pedagogy Torments Itself with a Question That Questions Itself.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010. 85-86. "Poetry counters wisdom with foolishness. Poetry counters truth with falsity, counters clarity with drunkenness, memory with forgetting" (85).

---."As in the Green Trees. The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 1-3.

---. “‘The Oracular Tree Acquiring’: On Romanticism as Radical Praxis.” Active Romanticism: The Radical Impulse in Nineteenth-Century and Contemporary Poetic Practice. Ed. Julie Carr and Jeffrey C. Robinson. Tuscaloosa, AL: University of Alabama Press, 2015. 31-46.

---. “Open Letter.” The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. Ed. Claudia Rankine, Beth Loffreda, & Max King Cap. Albany, NY: Fence Books, 2015. 152-154.

Beasley, Bruce. “A Poetics of Monstrosity.” Lyric Postmodernisms: An Anthology of Contemporary Innovative Poetries. Edited by Reginald Shepherd. Denver: Counterpath Press, 2008. 1-3. "The poem for me is a monstrous body, its surface all exposed inside, brain and lung and heart chamber and viscera, appalling and fascinating to stare into" (1).

Beck, Julian. “The State Will Be Served Even By Poets.” Poems for the Millennium: The University of California Book of Modern & Postmodern Poetry. Volume Two: From Postwar to Millennium. Ed. Jerome Rothenberg and Pierre Joris. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998. 432-433. "everything must be rewritten then" (432).

Bee, Susan [Susan Bee Laufer]. “Photograms.” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984. 92-93. "Photograms are a fom of bricollage. Bits of scraps, cotton, buttons, etc.,--materials 'ready to hand'--are collaged together and transformed with the product often having no outward relationship to the elements that formed it" (92-93).

Bee, Susan [Laufer] and Charles Bernstein. “Style.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001. 635-636. "It is said that one can tell during a conversation that lasts no longer than a summer shower whether or not a person is cultivated" (635).

Belitt, Ben. “In Search of the American Scene.” Poets on Poetry. Ed. Howard Nemerov. New York: Basic Books, 1966. 48-57. "American poets since Whitman have reason to wonder what Whitman heard when he 'heard America singing'" (48).

Bell, Marvin. “The Impure Every Time.” Claims for Poetry. Ed. Donald Hall. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000. 9-12. "I choose poetry. I choose the ugly as well as the beautiful, knowing it will all be beautiful soon enough" (10).

---. Untitled essay on a poem. Fifty Contemporary Poets: The Creative Process. Ed. Alberta T. Turner. New York: David McKay Co., 1977. 41-45. "I told my students that I felt I would be a beginner until the age of forty" (45).

---. Untitled essay on an Ars Poetica. What Will Suffice: Contemporary American Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Christopher Buckley and Christopher Merrill. Salt Lake City: Gibbs Smith, 1997.

---. “Noun/Object/Image.” A Field Guide to Contemporary Poetry and Poetics. Revised Edition. Ed. Stuart Friebert, David Walker, and David Young. Oberlin, OH: Oberlin College Press, 1997.

---. “The ‘Technique’ of Re-Reading.” Poetics: Essays on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Paul Mariani and George Murphy. Ocean Bluff, MA: Tendril Magazine, 1984.

Bellamy, Dodie. “Delinquent.” A Poetics of Criticism. Edited by Juliana Spahr, Mark Wallace, Kristin Prevallet, and Pam Rehm. Buffalo: Leave Books, 1994. 293-301. "Who tells you to be bad in writing?" (295).

---. “Can't We Just Call It Sex? In Memory of David Wojnarowicz.” A Guide to Poetics Journal: Writing in the Expanded Field 1982-1998. Ed. Lyn Hejinian & Barrett Watten. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2013. 313-319. "I met Wojnarowicz on Castro and 18th, in front of the camera shop" (318).

Bellen, Martine. “Time Travel and Poetry.” Lyric Postmodernisms: An Anthology of Contemporary Innovative Poetries. Edited by Reginald Shepherd. Denver: Counterpath Press, 2008.

Benedetti, David. “The Poem Beginning What It Is.” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

Benjamin, Walter. “Modernism.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

---. "On Some Motifs in Baudelaire." The Lyric Theory Reader: A Critical Anthology. Ed. Virginia Jackson and Yopie Prins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014. 327-338.

Benson, Steve. “Close Reading: Leavings and Cleavings” A Guide to Poetics Journal: Writing in the Expanded Field 1982-1998. Ed. Lyn Hejinian & Barrett Watten. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2013. 37-45. "Contemporary poetry that intentionally frustrates or coopts the conventional agents of contextualization would then be hardest to read, depending so overwhelmingly on the reader's commitment to formulating an active relationship to the text in order to maintain an ongoing contact that might find some use-value (even if play, some gambit sems prerequisite, at virtually every moment)" (37).

---. “On Realism.” In the American Tree. Ed. Ron Silliman. Orono, ME: National Poetry Foundation, 1986. 489. "I don't have a sense of myself, my own ways, my own predilections and abilities, as standard or integral; they seem to me rather gratuitous and conditional, while certainly purposive and significant and resistant in circ*mstances of engagement with some other" (489).

---. “From a Letter to an Editor.” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

Bergvall, Caroline. “Writing at the Crossroads of Languages.” Telling It Slant: Avant-Garde Poetics of the 1990s. Ed. Mark Wallace & Steven Marks. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2001. 207-223. “Issues of displacement, dislocation, and plurilingualism will be here positively envisaged as an investigation of the particularities of cultural localization and linguistic exchanges. Sometimes subterraneanly, sometimes overtly, it is therefore also the questions of origins, the myth of Home(coming), that this work critiques and responds to” (207).

---. “Handwriting as a Form of Protest: Fiona Templeton’s Cells of Release.” The Consequence of Innovation: 21st Century Poetics. Edited by Craig Dworkin. New York: Roof Books, 2008. 215-231.

Bernstein, Charles. “Semblance.” Postmodern American Poetry: A Norton Anthology. Ed. Paul Hoover. New York: W. W. Norton, 1994.

---. “Writing and Method.” A Guide to Poetics Journal: Writing in the Expanded Field 1982-1998. Ed. Lyn Hejinian & Barrett Watten. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2013. 46-54. "For what makes poetry poetry and philosophy philosophy is largely a tradition of thinking and writing, a social matrix of publications, professional associations, audience; more, indeed, facts of history and social convention than intrinsic necessities of the 'medium' or 'idea' of either one" (46).

---. “The Dollar Value of Poetry.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

---. “Comedy and the Poetics of Political Form.” The Politics of Poetic Form: Poetry and Public Policy. Ed. Charles Bernstein. New York: Roof Books, 1998.

---. “Artifice of Absorption.” Artifice & Indeterminacy: An Anthology of New Poetics. Ed. Christopher Beach. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1998.

---. “The Stadium of Explanation.” Code of Signals: Recent Writings in Poetics. Ed. Michael Palmer. Berkeley: North Atlantic Books, 1983.

---. “The Conspiracy of ‘Us’.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “The Difficult Poem.” Poetry & Pedagogy: The Challenge of the Contemporary. Ed. Joan Retallack and Juliana Spahr. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2006.

---. “Creative Wreading: A Primer.” Poetry & Pedagogy: The Challenge of the Contemporary. Ed. Joan Retallack and Juliana Spahr. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2006.

---. “Open Letter.” The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. Ed. Claudia Rankine, Beth Loffreda, & Max King Cap. Albany, NY: Fence Books, 2015. 64-65.

---. “Stray Straws and Straw Men.” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

---. “The Objects of Meaning.” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

---. “How Empty Is My Bread Pudding.” Contemporary Poetics. Ed. Louis Armand. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2007. 5-14. “The new is never new but we make it new in order to keep it from becoming dead to us. The motto shouldn’t be make it new but make it live, but necrophilia surrounds us and we take its stench as the perfume of our hip indifference to art as something that changes in time, shifts against the tides, hollers in anguish and exasperation at the suffocating banalities that seem to call our name out loud, as if we were written by them” (6).

---. “A Blow Is Like an Instrument.” Poetry and Cultural Studies: A Reader. Edited by Maria Damon and Ira Livingston. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2009. 359-372.

---. “The Art of Immemorability.” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 504-516.

---. “Time out of Motion: Looking Ahead to See Backward.” Conversant Essays: Contemporary Poets on Poetry. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1990. 420-430.

---. "Thank You for Saying Thank You." Reading the Difficulties: Dialogues with Contemporary American Innovative Poetry. Ed. Thomas Fink and Judith Halden-Sullivan. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2014. 15-17. "This is a totally / accessible poem" (15).

Berrigan, Anselm. Untitled Poetics Statement. The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 17. "No more poetics" (17).

Berrigan, Edmund. Untitled Poetics Statement. The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 23. "A good poem keeps opening itself up" (23).

Berrigan, Ted. “The Business of Writing Poetry.” Talking Poetics from Naropa Institute: Annals of the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics. Volume 1. Ed. Anne Waldman and Marilyn Webb. Boulder: Shambhala, 1978.

---. Untitled piece on Kerouac. Beats at Naropa. Ed. Anne Waldman and Laura Wright. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2009.

---. “Workshop.” Civil Disobediences: Poetics and Politics in Action. Ed. Anne Waldman and Lisa Birman. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2004.

Berssenbrugge, Mei-mei. “By Correspondence.” American Women Poets in the 21st Century. Edited by Claudia Rankine and Juliana Spahr. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2002.

---. “New Form.” Lyric Postmodernisms: An Anthology of Contemporary Innovative Poetries. Edited by Reginald Shepherd. Denver: Counterpath Press, 2008.

Berry, Wendell. “The Specialization of Poetry.” The Poet’s Work. Ed. Reginald Gibbons. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1979.

---. “Damage.” Claims for Poetry. Ed. Donald Hall. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000.

---. “Poetry and Song.” The McGraw Hill Book of Poetry. Edited by Robert DiYanni and Kraft Rompf. New York: McGraw Hill, 1993.

Berryman, John. “Changes.” Poets on Poetry. Ed. Howard Nemerov. New York: Basic Books, 1966.

Betts, Reginald Dwayne. “An Abridged Version.” The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. Ed. Claudia Rankine, Beth Loffreda, & Max King Cap. Albany, NY: Fence Books, 2015. 235-237.

Beyer, Tamiko. “A Slanty Kind of Racial(ized) Poetics.” The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. Ed. Claudia Rankine, Beth Loffreda, & Max King Cap. Albany, NY: Fence Books, 2015. 245-247.

Bhatt, Sujata. “from ‘Search for My Tongue.’” Poems for the Millennium: The University of California Book of Modern & Postmodern Poetry. Volume Two: From Postwar to Millennium. Ed. Jerome Rothenberg and Pierre Joris. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998.

Biddinger, Mary and John Gallaher. “Introduction…” The Monkey & The Wrench: Essays Into Contemporary Poetics. Akron, OH: University of Akron Press, 2011.

Bidart, Frank. “Borges and I.” After Confession: Poetry as Autobiography. Saint Paul: Graywolf Press, 2001. 129-131.

Biglieri, Gregg. “Invitation to a Misreading: Andrews’ Lip Service.” The Consequence of Innovation: 21st Century Poetics. Edited by Craig Dworkin. New York: Roof Books, 2008. 103-116.

---. “The Task of Poetics, the Fate of Innovation, and the Aesthetics of Criticism.” The Consequence of Innovation: 21st Century Poetics. Edited by Craig Dworkin. New York: Roof Books, 2008. 37-57.

Billeter, Jean Francois. From “The Chinese Art of Writing.” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 290-310.

Bishop, Elizabeth. “Valdes, Gregorio.” Poets on Painters: Essays on the Art of Painting by Twentieth-Century Poets. Edited by J.D. McClatchy. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988. 153-162.

---. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 13.

---. “Letter to Miss Pierson.” Strong Words: Modern Poets on Modern Poetry. Edited by W.N. Herbert and Matthew Hollis. Northumberland: Bloodaxe, 2000. 104-105.

Blaeser, Kimberly. “The Voices We Carry.” After Confession: Poetry as Autobiography. Saint Paul: Graywolf Press, 2001. 269-280.

Blake, William. “Art and Imagination.” The McGraw Hill Book of Poetry. Edited by Robert DiYanni and Kraft Rompf. New York: McGraw Hill, 1993.

---. From “The Marriage of Heaven and Hell.” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 104-106.

Blanchfield, Brian. "Freely Espousing or, Subject: to the Avant-Garde." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 4-8.

Blanchot, Maurice. “Mallarmé’s Experience.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

---. “The Book to Come.” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 141-159.

Blaser, Robin. “The Fire.” The Poetics of The New American Poetry. Edited by Donald Allen and Warren Tallman. New York: Grove Press, 1973.

---. “Irreparables, I: an essay-ode.” Civil Disobediences: Poetics and Politics in Action. Ed. Anne Waldman and Lisa Birman. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2004.

--- and Cole Swensen, Samuel R. Delany, Michael du Plessis, Akilah Oliver, Eileen Myles, kari edwards, and Roberto Tejada. “Panel: Politics of Identity.” Civil Disobediences: Poetics and Politics in Action. Ed. Anne Waldman and Lisa Birman. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2004.

--- and Robert Creeley, Bobbie Louise Hawkins, and Michael Ondaatje. “Panel on Personal Geography.” Civil Disobediences: Poetics and Politics in Action. Ed. Anne Waldman and Lisa Birman. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2004.

Blau, Herbert. “Deep Throat: The Grail of the Voice.” The Book, Spiritual Instrument. Edited by Jerome Rothenburg and David Guss. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 139-154.

Bloom, Harold. “Freud and the Poetic Sublime.” Antaeus. Poetry & Poetics. Summer / Autumn, 1978. Vol. 30/31.

---. "The Breaking of Form." The Lyric Theory Reader: A Critical Anthology. Ed. Virginia Jackson and Yopie Prins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014. 275-287.

Bly, Robert. “A Wrong Turning in American Poetry.” Twentieth Cent. American Poetry. Ed. Gioia, et al.

---. “What the Image Can Do.” Claims for Poetry. Ed. Donald Hall. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000.

---. “Looking for Dragon Smoke.” 20th Century Poetry & Poetics. Fourth Edition. Ed. Gary Geddes. Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996.

---. “Reflections on the Origins of Poetic Form.” A Field Guide to Contemporary Poetry and Poetics. Revised Edition. Ed. Stuart Friebert, David Walker, and David Young. Oberlin, OH: Oberlin College Press, 1997.

---. “Wallace Stevens and Dr. Jekyll.” American Poets in 1976. Ed. William Heyen. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1976.

---. Untitled essay on an Ars Poetica. What Will Suffice: Contemporary American Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Christopher Buckley and Christopher Merrill. Salt Lake City: Gibbs Smith, 1997.

---. “Reorganizing the Image as a Form of Intelligence.” A Field Guide to Contemporary Poetry and Poetics. Revised Edition. Ed. Stuart Friebert, David Walker, and David Young. Oberlin, OH: Oberlin College Press, 1997.

---. Essay. Towards a New American Poetics: Essays & Interviews. Edited by Ekbert Faas. Santa Barbara: Black Sparrow Press, 1979. 223-243.

Boccaccio, Giovanni. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003.15.

Boccioni, Umberto. “Technical Manifesto of Futurist Sculpture.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “Manifesto of the Futurist Painters.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “Absolute Motion + Relative Motion = Dynamism 1914.” Futurist Manifestos. Edited by Umbro Appolonio. Boston: Artworks, 2001. 150-154. “That is to say, we must try to find a form which will be able to express a new absolute – speed, which any true modern spirit cannot ignore” (152).

---. “Futurist Dynamism and French Painting 1913.” Futurist Manifestos. Edited by Umbro Appolonio. Boston: Artworks, 2001. 107-110. “It was we who said, amid the sarcasm and mistrust of the critics, that modern life is the only source of inspiration for a modern artist, and therefore for dynamism” (110).

---. “Futurist Painting and Sculpture (extracts) 1914.” Futurist Manifestos. Edited by Umbro Appolonio. Boston: Artworks, 2001. 172-181. “We live out the object in the motion of its inner forces; we do not depict its incidental appearance” (177).

---. “Plastic Dynamism 1913.” Futurist Manifestos. Edited by Umbro Appolonio. Boston: Artworks, 2001. 92-95. “With dynamism, then, art climes to an ideal, superior plane, creating a style and expressing our own age of speed and of simultaneity” (94).

---. “Technical Manifesto of Futurism Sculpture 1912.” Futurist Manifestos. Edited by Umbro Appolonio. Boston: Artworks, 2001. 51-65. “The opening and closing of a valve creates a rhythm which is just as beautiful to look at as the movements of an eyelid, and infinitely more modern” (64).

---. “The Plastic Foundations of Futurist Sculpture and Painting 1913.” Futurist Manifestos. Edited by Umbro Appolonio. Boston: Artworks, 2001. 88-90. “Areas between one object and another are not merely empty spaces but continuing materials of different intensities, which we reveal with visible lines which do not correspond to any photographic truth” (89).

---. “Futurist Painting: Technical Manifestos.” Futurist Manifestos. Edited by Umbro Appolonio. Boston: Artworks, 2001. 27-31. “The suffering of a man is of the same interest to us as the suffering of an electric lamp, which, with spasmodic starts, shrieks out the most heartrending expressions of color” (29).

---. “The Exhibitors to the Public 1912.” Futurist Manifestos. Edited by Umbro Appolonio. Boston: Artworks, 2001. 45-51. “The simultaneousness of states of mind in the work of art: that is the intoxicating aim of our art” (47).

--- and Carlo Carra, Luigi Russolo, Giacomo Balla, Gino Severini. "Manifesto of the Futurist Painters 1910.” Futurist Manifestos. Edited by Umbro Appolonio. Boston: Artworks, 2001. 24-27. “Comrades, we tell you now that the triumphant progress of science makes profound changes in humanity inevitable, changes which are hacking an abyss between those docile slaves of past tradition and us free moderns, who are confident in the radiant splendor of our future.” (24-25).

--- and others. “Futurist Painting: Technical Manifesto.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Bogan, Louise. “The Pleasures of Formal Poetry.” The Poet’s Work. Ed. Reginald Gibbons. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1979.

---. “The Springs of Poetry.” Twentieth-Century American Poetics: Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Dana Gioia, David Mason, and Meg Scho*rke. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2004.

Boland, Eavan. “The Woman Poet: Her Dilemma.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

---. Untitled Essay on a poem. Ecstatic Occasions, Expedient Forms: 85 Leading Contemporary Poets Select and Comment on Their Poems. Ed. David Lehman. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2001.

---. “The Politics of Eroticism.” 20th Century Poetry & Poetics. Fourth Edition. Ed. Gary Geddes. Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996.

---. “The Wrong Way.” Strong Words: Modern Poets on Modern Poetry. Edited by W.N. Herbert and Matthew Hollis. Northumberland: Bloodaxe, 2000. 215-218.

Bolina, Jaswinder. “What I Tell Them.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.

---. "A View from the Factory Floor." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 9-12

Boone, Bruce. “Writing, Power and Activity.” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

Borges, Jorge Luis and others. “Ultraist Manifesto.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 17.

---. “On the Cult of Books.” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 347-350.

Borkhuis, Charles. “Writing from Inside Language: Late Surrealism…” Telling It Slant: Avant-Garde Poetics of the 1990s. Ed. Mark Wallace & Steven Marks. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2001. 237-253. “In this regard French structuralism and its deconstructive descendants have provided the enriched soil necessary for the growth of textual, language-based avant-garde, which has in turn, spawned elements of a linguistic parasurrealism that have proved more self-reflexive and adaptable to postmodern conditions than earlier forms of orthodox surrealism” (237).

Borsuk, Amaranth. "Towards and Autodestructive Poetics." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 13-17.

Boulez, Pierre. “Experiment, Ostriches and Music.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “Demythologizing the Conductor.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Boully, Jenny. “The Page as Poetry’s Artifact.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.

---. "Innerworkings, In Meadows." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 18-20.

Božičević, Ana. "How to Be an Eastern European Poet in Amerika." Cross Worlds: Transcultural Poetics: An Anthology. Ed. Anne Waldman & Laura Wright. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2014. 315-318.

Bragaglia, Anton Giulio. “Futurist Photodynamism 1911.” Futurist Manifestos. Edited by Umbro Appolonio. Boston: Artworks, 2001. 38-45. “We seek the interior essence of things: pure movement; and we prefer to see everything in motion, since as things are dematerialized in motion they become idealized, while still retaining, deep down, a strong skeleton of truth” (44).

Brathwaite, Kamau. “History of the Voice, 1979-1981.” Poetry and Cultural Studies: A Reader. Edited by Maria Damon and Ira Livingston. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2009. 417-427.

Braque, Georges. “Reflections on Painting.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Brennan, Sherry. “make shift.” Telling It Slant: Avant-Garde Poetics of the 1990s. Ed. Mark Wallace & Steven Marks. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2001. 323-338. “This kind of language use, a poetry that ‘prevents reality,’ depends on a very material notion of language – language as that which moves and has consequences in our world, a bodily language, a language constituted within or bound up with our bodies; thus, a multiple and varied language – languages, I should say” (335).

---. “Wacker Drive: Reading the ‘Study of Impact on Atlantic Salmon an American Shad.’” A Poetics of Criticism. Edited by Juliana Spahr, Mark Wallace, Kristin Prevallet, and Pam Rehm. Buffalo: Leave Books, 1994. 101-124. "The Salish are one of very few groups who make coiled basekets decorated with designs by an interweaving process called imbrication" (103).

Breslin, Paul. “How to Read the New Contemporary Poem.” Poetics: Essays on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Paul Mariani and George Murphy. Ocean Bluff, MA: Tendril Magazine, 1984. 35-50.

Breton, André. “Manifesto of Surrealism.” Toward the Open Field: Poets on the Art of Poetry 1800-1950. Ed. Melissa Kwasny. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2004.

---. “Declaration.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “Foreword to The Headless Woman by Max Ernst.” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 213-220.

--- and Paul Eluard. “Notes on Poetry (excerpt).” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

--- and Diego Rivera [Léon Trotsky]. “Manifesto for an Independent Revolutionary Art.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Briante, Susan. "Towards a Poetics of the Dow." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 21-26.

---. Untitled Poetics Statement. The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 29-30. "I am looking for a new metrics and new ways to use the lyric to gauge those 'signals, processes' that shape our lives and mark our complicities" (29).

Bridges, Robert. “Poetry and Poetic Diction.” The Prelude to Poetry: The English Poets in Defence and Praise of Their Own Art. Ed. Ernest Rhys. London: J.M. Dent, 1927.

---. “A Letter to a Musician on English Prosody.” The Structure of Verse: Modern Essays on Prosody. Ed. Harvey Gross. New York: Ecco Press, 1979.

Brinnin, John. “Some Phases of My Work.” Poets on Poetry. Ed. Howard Nemerov. New York: Basic Books, 1966.

---. “‘Pray you undo this button:’ The Sentimental Strategies.” American Poets in 1976. Ed. William Heyen. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1976.

Brock-Broido, Lucie. “Myself a Kangaroo…” American Women Poets in the 21st Century. Edited by Claudia Rankine and Juliana Spahr. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2002.

---. Untitled Essay on a poem. Ecstatic Occasions, Expedient Forms: 85 Leading Contemporary Poets Select and Comment on Their Poems. Ed. David Lehman. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2001.

Bromige, David. “By Visible Truth We Mean…” In the American Tree. Ed. Ron Silliman. Orono, ME: National Poetry Foundation, 1986.

---. “Notes not titled EDEN LOG.” Code of Signals: Recent Writings in Poetics. Ed. Michael Palmer. Berkeley: North Atlantic Books, 1983.

---. “Some Fields the Track Goes Through.” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

Brooks, Cleanth. “Keats’s Sylvan Historian…” Criticism: Major Statements. Ed. Charles Kaplan & William Anderson. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1991.

--- and Robert Penn Warren. "Introduction to Understanding Poetry." The Lyric Theory Reader: A Critical Anthology. Ed. Virginia Jackson and Yopie Prins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014. 177-192.

Brooks, Gwendolyn. “The New Black.” Twentieth-Century American Poetics: Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Dana Gioia, David Mason, and Meg Scho*rke. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2004.

Brossard, Nicole. “Poetic Politics.” The Politics of Poetic Form: Poetry and Public Policy. Ed. Charles Bernstein. New York: Roof Books, 1998.

Brower, Reuben. "The Speaking Voice." The Lyric Theory Reader: A Critical Anthology. Ed. Virginia Jackson and Yopie Prins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014. 211-218.

Brown, Jericho. “Love the Masters.” The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. Ed. Claudia Rankine, Beth Loffreda, & Max King Cap. Albany, NY: Fence Books, 2015. 231-234.

Browne, Laynie. "Rendering the Invisible: A Translucent Imperative for Poetry." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 27-28.

Browning, Robert. “Shelley and the Art of Poetry.” The Prelude to Poetry: The English Poets in Defence and Praise of Their Own Art. Ed. Ernest Rhys. London: J.M. Dent, 1927.

Browning, Sommer. Untitled Poetics Statement. The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 37-38. "Joking in the hallowed space, slapstick in the theorem, the punchline in the hymn, I believe in these things" (37).

Brownstein, Michael. “Imagination for Adults.” Talking Poetics from Naropa Institute: Annals of the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics. Volume Two. Ed. Anne Waldman and Marilyn Webb. Boulder: Shambhala, 1978.

Bruchac, Joseph. “The Self within the Circle.” After Confession: Poetry as Autobiography. Saint Paul: Graywolf Press, 2001. 71-80.

Bryant, William Cullen. “On Poetry in Its Relation to Our Age and Country.” American Poetry and Poetics: Poems and Critical Documents from the Puritans to Robert Frost. Edited by Daniel G. Hoffman. New York: Anchor Books, 1962.

---. “Lectures on Poetry.” Poets on Poetry. Ed. Charles Norman. New York: Free Press, 1962.

Bryusov, V. “Keys to the Mysteries (parts I and II).” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Bunting, Basil. “The Poet’s Point of View.” Strong Words: Modern Poets on Modern Poetry. Edited by W.N. Herbert and Matthew Hollis. Northumberland: Bloodaxe, 2000. 80-82.

Burke, Kenneth. “Psychology and Form.” Criticism: Major Statements. Ed. Charles Kaplan & William Anderson. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1991.

---. “The Poetic Process.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

Burliuk, David and others. “Slap in the Face of Public Taste.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Burns, Elizabeth. “Talking About Bishop’s God And Talking About That.” A Poetics of Criticism. Edited by Juliana Spahr, Mark Wallace, Kristin Prevallet, and Pam Rehm. Buffalo: Leave Books, 1994. 197-200.

Burns, Gerald. “A Thing about Language for Bernstein.” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

Burns, Robert. “Songs and Song Writing.” The Prelude to Poetry: The English Poets in Defence and Praise of Their Own Art. Ed. Ernest Rhys. London: J.M. Dent, 1927.

Burnside, Madeleine. “Notes Towards a Poetics…” Code of Signals: Recent Writings in Poetics. Ed. Michael Palmer. Berkeley: North Atlantic Books, 1983.

---. “Glyphs.” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

Burr, Zofia. “Of Poetry and Power: Maya Angelou on the Inaugural Stage.” Poetry and Cultural Studies: A Reader. Edited by Maria Damon and Ira Livingston. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2009. 428-436.

Burroughs, William S. “It Belongs to the Cucumbers…” Talking Poetics from Naropa Institute: Annals of the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics. Volume 1. Ed. Anne Waldman and Marilyn Webb. Boulder: Shambhala, 1978.

Burroughs, William S. and Rick Fields, Allen Ginsberg, W.S. Merwin, Chögyam Trungpa, Rinpoche, Anne Waldman, Philip Whalen, David Rome, Joshua Zim. “‘Frightened Chrysanthemums’”: Poets’ Colloquium.” Beats at Naropa. Ed. Anne Waldman and Laura Wright. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2009.

Burt, Stephen. “How to Teach ‘Difficult’ Poetry and Why It Might Not Be So Difficult After All.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.

---. “Cornucopia, or, Contemporary American Rhyme.” The Monkey & The Wrench: Essays Into Contemporary Poetics. Akron, OH: University of Akron Press, 2011.

Butler, Blake. "Mirror-Maze-Child-More." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 29.

Byron, Lord. “The Present State of English Poetry.” The Prelude to Poetry: The English Poets in Defence and Praise of Their Own Art. Ed. Ernest Rhys. London: J.M. Dent, 1927.

Cage, John. “Themes and Variations.” Postmodern American Poetry: A Norton Anthology. Ed. Paul Hoover. New York: W. W. Norton, 1994.

---. Untitled Essay on a poem. Ecstatic Occasions, Expedient Forms: 85 Leading Contemporary Poets Select and Comment on Their Poems. Ed. David Lehman. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2001.

---. “from Lecture on Nothing.” Poems for the Millennium: The University of California Book of Modern & Postmodern Poetry. Volume Two: From Postwar to Millennium. Ed. Jerome Rothenberg and Pierre Joris. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998.

---. “Bang Fist.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “Empty Words with Relevant Materials.” Talking Poetics from Naropa Institute: Annals of the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics. Volume 1. Ed. Anne Waldman and Marilyn Webb. Boulder: Shambhala, 1978.

Cahun, Claude. “The Invisible Adventure.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Cain, Amina. "Slowness." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 30-31.

Calvino, Italo. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 19.

The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014.

Cameron, Dan. From “Living History: Faith Ringgold’s Rendezvous with the Twentieth Century.” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 489-493.

Campbell, Bruce. “Assembly Politics in the Global Economy: Nicaragua.” Poetry and Cultural Studies: A Reader. Edited by Maria Damon and Ira Livingston. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2009. 177-194.

Campion, Thomas. “Observations on the Art of English Poesie.” The Prelude to Poetry: The English Poets in Defence and Praise of Their Own Art. Ed. Ernest Rhys. London: J.M. Dent, 1927.

Cap, Max King. “Floating Currency.” The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. Ed. Claudia Rankine, Beth Loffreda, & Max King Cap. Albany, NY: Fence Books, 2015. 23-25.

Caponegro, Mary. "Success in Circuit Lies (Redux)." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 32-35.

Carothers, Marhta L. “Novelty Books: Accent of Images and Words.” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 319-333.

Carr, Julie. “Teaching: An Improvisation.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.

---. "The Body and the Avant-Garde." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 36-39.

---. Untitled Poetics Statement. The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 43-44. "I'd like to say then that the gun and the poem share a common purpose. And that purpose is to allow us these proximities" (44).

---. “The Sublime is Now Again.” Active Romanticism: The Radical Impulse in Nineteenth-Century and Contemporary Poetic Practice. Ed. Julie Carr and Jeffrey C. Robinson. Tuscaloosa, AL: University of Alabama Press, 2015. 212-227.

Carrà, Carlo. “The Painting of Sounds, Noises, and Smells.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “Declaration.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “Plastic Planes as Spherical Expansions in Space 1913.” Futurist Manifestos. Edited by Umbro Appolonio. Boston: Artworks, 2001. 91-92. “It is dynamic and chaotic in application, producing in the minds of the observer a veritable mass of plastic emotions; this is because each particular perspective in our painting corresponds to a vibration in the mind” (92).

---. “Warpainting (extracts) 1915.” Futurist Manifestos. 202-205. “A painter who is affected by illustrationism never achieves, or even tries for, the expression of his feelings in the plastic world of form and colour, since for him lines, planes, colours express nothing in themselves” (202).

Carroll, Lewis. From “Through the Looking Glass.” Prose Keys to Modern Poetry. Edited by Karl Shapiro. Evanston: Row Peterson & Co., 1962. 188-192.

Carruth, Hayden. “The Question of Poetic Form.” Claims for Poetry. Ed. Donald Hall. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000.

---. Untitled essay on a poem. Fifty Contemporary Poets: The Creative Process. Ed. Alberta T. Turner. New York: David McKay Co., 1977.

---. Untitled essay on an Ars Poetica. What Will Suffice: Contemporary American Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Christopher Buckley and Christopher Merrill. Salt Lake City: Gibbs Smith, 1997.

Cather, Willa. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 21.

Caton, Steven C. “The Poetic Construction of Self.” Poetry and Cultural Studies: A Reader. Edited by Maria Damon and Ira Livingston. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2009. 133-146.

Cayley, John. “Writing (Under-) Sky: On Xu Bing’s Tianshu.” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 497-503.

Celan, Paul. “The Meridian Speech.” Poems for the Millennium: The University of California Book of Modern & Postmodern Poetry. Volume Two: From Postwar to Millennium. Ed. Jerome Rothenberg and Pierre Joris. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998.

---. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 23.

Cendrars, Blaise. “On Projection Powder.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “Profound Today.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “The ABCs of Cinema.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “Simultaneous Contrast.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “The Prose of the Trans-Siberian and of Little Jeanne of France.” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 167-174.

Cernuda, Luis. “Words Before a Reading.” The Poet’s Work. Ed. Reginald Gibbons. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1979.

Cervantes, Lorna Dee. “The Beats and Beyond.” Beats at Naropa. Ed. Anne Waldman and Laura Wright. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2009.

Césaire, Aimé. “Poetry and Knowledge.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

---. “In the Guise of a Literary Manifesto.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Césaire, Suzanne. “The Domain of the Marvelous.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “Surrealism and Us.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Chakrabarty, Dipesh. “Nation and Imagination.” Poetry and Cultural Studies: A Reader. Edited by Maria Damon and Ira Livingston. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2009. 285-300.

Chamberlain, Lori. “‘A Sentence in Inquiry.’…” Code of Signals: Recent Writings in Poetics. Ed. Michael Palmer. Berkeley: North Atlantic Books, 1983.

Chang, Jennifer. “Statement of Purpose.” The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. Ed. Claudia Rankine, Beth Loffreda, & Max King Cap. Albany, NY: Fence Books, 2015. 53-59.

Char, Rene. “The Formal Share.” The Poet’s Work. Ed. Reginald Gibbons. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1979.

Chaucer, Geoffrey. “Invocation from The Hous of Fame.” The Prelude to Poetry: The English Poets in Defence and Praise of Their Own Art. Ed. Ernest Rhys. London: J.M. Dent, 1927.

Cheek, Cris and Kirby Malone, Marshall Reese. “TV Trio present Career Wrist.” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

Chen, Ken. "From The Excerpts: Poetics or or Politics." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 40-45.

Child, Abigail. “Cross Referencing the Units of Sight and Sound / Film and Language.” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

Chin, Marilyn. “Translating Self: Stealing from Wang Wei, Kowtowing to Hughes, Hooking Up with Keats, Undone by Donne.” After Confession: Poetry as Autobiography. Saint Paul: Graywolf Press, 2001. 305-316.

Choi, Don Mee. Untitled Poetics Statement. The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 51. "I am in trance, transparent, phonically speaking" (51).

Christensen, Paul. “Postmodernism Bildungsromans: The Drama of Recent Autobiography.” Conversant Essays: Contemporary Poets on Poetry. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1990. 510-518.

Cixous, Hélène and Catherine Clément. “Sorties.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Clampitt, Amy. “What Comes Up out of the Ground: On Budenz, Heaney, Ashbery, and Others.” Conversant Essays: Contemporary Poets on Poetry. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1990. 263-268.

Clark, Tom. From “Robert Creeley and the Genius of the American Common Place.” A Poetics of Criticism. Edited by Juliana Spahr, Mark Wallace, Kristin Prevallet, and Pam Rehm. Buffalo: Leave Books, 1994. 79-86. "Our search for the tutelary spirit of locality or genius loci of Robert Creeley's poetry in his particular linguistic origins leads us back first to rural Massachusetts, here he was raised, then beyond to the coast of Maine" (81).

Clarke, Cheryl. “. . . She Still Wrote out the Word Kotex on a Piece of Paper Wrapped up in a Dollar Bill. . . .” Conversant Essays: Contemporary Poets on Poetry. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1990. 443-458.

Clifford, James. “Transcriptions.” Code of Signals: Recent Writings in Poetics. Ed. Michael Palmer. Berkeley: North Atlantic Books, 1983.

Clifton, Lucille. “Poetics Statement.” Eleven More American Women Poets in the 21st Century: Poetics Across North America. Ed. Claudia Rankine & Lisa Sewell. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2012. 67-68. "Poetry, it seems to me...comes from both intellect and intuition" (67).

Clover, Joshua. “Once Against…” American Poets in the 21st Century: The New Poetics. Edited by Claudia Rankine and Lisa Sewell. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2007.

Clune, Michael. “The Poem at the End of Theory.” The Consequence of Innovation: 21st Century Poetics. Edited by Craig Dworkin. New York: Roof Books, 2008. 243-254.

Cobbing, Bob. “The Shape and Size of Poetry.” Poems for the Millennium: The University of California Book of Modern & Postmodern Poetry. Volume Two: From Postwar to Millennium. Ed. Jerome Rothenberg and Pierre Joris. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998.

Codrescu, Andrei. "Infiltrating the Mass Media: Romania, 1989." Cross Worlds: Transcultural Poetics: An Anthology. Ed. Anne Waldman & Laura Wright. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2014. 28-34.

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Cole, Barbara. “Bruce Andrews’ Venus: Paying Lip Service to Ecriture Feminine.” The Consequence of Innovation: 21st Century Poetics. Edited by Craig Dworkin. New York: Roof Books, 2008. 93-101.

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---. “The Poet, the Imagination.” The McGraw Hill Book of Poetry. Edited by Robert DiYanni and Kraft Rompf. New York: McGraw Hill, 1993.

---. “Wordsworth and the Art of Poetry.” The Prelude to Poetry: The English Poets in Defence and Praise of Their Own Art. Ed. Ernest Rhys. London: J.M. Dent, 1927.

---. “Chapter 14 of Biographia Literaria and Poesy or Art.” Toward the Open Field: Poets on the Art of Poetry 1800-1950. Ed. Melissa Kwasny. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2004.

Collins, Arda. Untitled Poetics Statement. The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 59-60. "In poetry, atmosphere as a presence can supersede rhetoric and familiar syntactic constructions to create a form for speech" (59).

Collom, Jack. “The Infinite Amount of Work to Be Done.” Civil Disobediences: Poetics and Politics in Action. Ed. Anne Waldman and Lisa Birman. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2004.

Collins, Billy. “My Grandfather’s Tackle Box: The Limits of Memory-Driven Poetry.” After Confession: Poetry as Autobiography. Saint Paul: Graywolf Press, 2001. 81-91.

Confucius. From “The Analects.” Prose Keys to Modern Poetry. Edited by Karl Shapiro. Evanston: Row Peterson & Co., 1962. 120-121.

Conoley, Gillian. “Artist’s Statement.” Lyric Postmodernisms: An Anthology of Contemporary Innovative Poetries. Edited by Reginald Shepherd. Denver: Counterpath Press, 2008.

Conrad, Joseph. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 25.

Coolidge, Clark. “Words.” Postmodern American Poetry: A Norton Anthology. Ed. Paul Hoover. New York: W. W. Norton, 1994.

---. “From A Letter to Paul Metcalf…” In the American Tree. Ed. Ron Silliman. Orono, ME: National Poetry Foundation, 1986.

---. “From Notebooks (1976-1982).” Code of Signals: Recent Writings in Poetics. Ed. Michael Palmer. Berkeley: North Atlantic Books, 1983.

---. “Arrangement.” Talking Poetics from Naropa Institute: Annals of the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics. Volume 1. Ed. Anne Waldman and Marilyn Webb. Boulder: Shambhala, 1978.

Corbett, William. “Journal Poetics.” Code of Signals: Recent Writings in Poetics. Ed. Michael Palmer. Berkeley: North Atlantic Books, 1983.

Corman, Cid. "Nothing I Withhold: A Socratic Rap." Cross Worlds: Transcultural Poetics: An Anthology. Ed. Anne Waldman & Laura Wright. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2014. 90-99. "In my own case, my life is worked directly into my poetry. There is nothing I withhold, of my life, in my poetry" (94).

Corn, Alfred. “Dickinson’s Paradoxical Losses.” Conversant Essays: Contemporary Poets on Poetry. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1990. 235-240.

Corra, Bruno. “Abstract Cinema - Chromatic Music 1912.” Futurist Manifestos. Edited by Umbro Appolonio. Boston: Artworks, 2001. 66-70. “Finally, in an unexpected dusty disintegration, the grey crumbles and the spectrum triumphs in a whirling of Catherine-wheels which disappear in their turn, buried under an avalanche of colours” (70).

Corradini, Bruno and Emilio Settimelli. “Weights, Measures and Prices of Artistic Genius – Futurist Manifesto 1914.” Futurist Manifestos. Edited by Umbro Appolonio. Boston: Artworks, 2001. 135-150. “Thus, having destroyed the snobbish passéism of art-as-ideal, of art-as-sublime-holy-inaccessible, of art-as-torment-purity-vow-solitude-disdain for reality – the anaemic melancholy of the spineless who cut themselves off from real life because they are unable to face it – the artist will finally find his place in life, along with the butcher and the tyre-manufacturer, the grave-digger and the speculator, the engineer and the farmer” (147).

Corso, Gregory. “Some of My Beginning…” Poets on Poetry. Ed. Howard Nemerov. New York: Basic Books, 1966.

Cotton, John. “Preface to The Bay Psalm Book.” American Poetry and Poetics: Poems and Critical Documents from the Puritans to Robert Frost. Edited by Daniel G. Hoffman. New York: Anchor Books, 1962.

Crane, Hart. “General Aims and Theories.” The Poet’s Work. Ed. Reginald Gibbons. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1979.

---. “From Mr. Crane to the Editor.” Modern Poets on Modern Poetry. Ed. James Scully. London: McGraw Hill, 1966.

---. “Hart Crane to Harriet Monroe.” The Poetics of The New American Poetry. Edited by Donald Allen and Warren Tallman. New York: Grove Press, 1973.

---. “Hart Crane to Otto H. Kahn.” The Poetics of The New American Poetry. Edited by Donald Allen and Warren Tallman. New York: Grove Press, 1973.

---. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 27.

---. “The Letters of Hart Crane.” The Poet’s Vacation: Selections from Letters of Holderlin, Rimbaud & Hart Crane. Edited and translated by Wiliam Burford and Christopher Middleton. Austin: University of Texas Press, n.d. 45-71.

Crase, Douglas. “How Emerson Avails.” Conversant Essays: Contemporary Poets on Poetry. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1990. 48-58.

Creeley, Robert. “To Define.” The New American Poetry 1945-1960. Ed. Donald Allen. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2000.

---. “Olson and Others…” The New American Poetry 1945-1960. Ed. Donald Allen. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2000.

---. “Poems Are a Complex.” Twentieth-Century American Poetics: Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Dana Gioia, David Mason, and Meg Scho*rke. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2004.

---. “On the Road…” Claims for Poetry. Ed. Donald Hall. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000.

---. “A Note.” Claims for Poetry. Ed. Donald Hall. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000.

---. “A Note on the Local.” Claims for Poetry. Ed. Donald Hall. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000.

---. “Statement for Paterson Society.” Claims for Poetry. Ed. Donald Hall. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000.

---. “A Sense of Measure.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

---. Untitled Essay on a poem. Ecstatic Occasions, Expedient Forms: 85 Leading Contemporary Poets Select and Comment on Their Poems. Ed. David Lehman. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2001.

---. “A Note on Ezra Pound.” The Poetics of The New American Poetry. Edited by Donald Allen and Warren Tallman. New York: Grove Press, 1973.

---. “Louis Zukofsky…” The Poetics of The New American Poetry. Edited by Donald Allen and Warren Tallman. New York: Grove Press, 1973.

---. “Introduction to The New Writing in the USA.” The Poetics of The New American Poetry. Edited by Donald Allen and Warren Tallman. New York: Grove Press, 1973.

---. “I’m Given to Write Poems.” The Poetics of The New American Poetry. Edited by Donald Allen and Warren Tallman. New York: Grove Press, 1973.

---. “Was That a Real Poem or Did You Just Make It Up Yourself?” American Poets in 1976. Ed. William Heyen.

---. “A Note on Franz Kline.” Poets on Painters: Essays on the Art of Painting by Twentieth-Century Poets. Edited by J.D. McClatchy. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988. 219-223.

---. Essay. Towards a New American Poetics: Essays & Interviews. Edited by Ekbert Faas. Santa Barbara: Black Sparrow Press, 1979. 147-163.

Critchley, Simon. “Wallace Stevens and the Intricate Evasions of As.” Contemporary Poetics. Ed. Louis Armand. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2007. 96-110. “It is easily said that the poet makes the ordinary extraordinary. Yet, the extraordinary is only extraordinary if it refers back to the ordinary, otherwise it would be empty. This is another way of drawing the distinction between imagination and fancy: the poetic imagination imagines things as they are, but beyond us, turned about, whereas fancy simply fantasizes about things that are not” (97).

Cronin, Jeremy. “Even under the Rine of Terror…” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

Crow, Mary. “Council on Counterpoetics” (with 10 others). Poems for the Millennium: The University of California Book of Modern & Postmodern Poetry. Volume Two: From Postwar to Millennium. Ed. Jerome Rothenberg and Pierre Joris. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998.

---. Untitled essay on an Ars Poetica. What Will Suffice: Contemporary American Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Christopher Buckley and Christopher Merrill. Salt Lake City: Gibbs Smith, 1997.

Crozier, Lorna. “from ‘Who’s Listening?’” 20th Century Poetry & Poetics. Fourth Edition. Ed. Gary Geddes. Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996.

Cruz, Cynthia. “Artist’s Statement.” The Iowa Anthology of New American Poetries. Ed. by Reginald Shepherd. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2004.

Cruz, Victor Hernandez. “Mountains in the North.” Postmodern American Poetry: A Norton Anthology. Ed. Paul Hoover. New York: W. W. Norton, 1994.

---. "Geographic Distortions: Culture, Politics, and Diversity." Cross Worlds: Transcultural Poetics: An Anthology. Ed. Anne Waldman & Laura Wright. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2014. 115-118.

Culler, Jonathan. "Lyric, History, and Genre." The Lyric Theory Reader: A Critical Anthology. Ed. Virginia Jackson and Yopie Prins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014. 63-77.

cummings, e.e. “Mostpeople and Ourselves.” The McGraw Hill Book of Poetry. Edited by Robert DiYanni and Kraft Rompf. New York: McGraw Hill, 1993.

---. “An Introduction.” Modern Poets on Modern Poetry. Ed. James Scully. London: McGraw Hill, 1966.

---. “Three Statements.” Poets on Poetry. Ed. Charles Norman. New York: Free Press, 1962.

---. “Forword to an Exhibit.” Poets on Painters: Essays on the Art of Painting by Twentieth-Century Poets. Edited by J.D. McClatchy. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988. 150-151.

---. “Foreword to is 5.” Strong Words: Modern Poets on Modern Poetry. Edited by W.N. Herbert and Matthew Hollis. Northumberland: Bloodaxe, 2000. 52-53.

---. “Introduction to Poems 1923-1954.” Prose Keys to Modern Poetry. Edited by Karl Shapiro. Evanston: Row Peterson & Co., 1962. 206-208.

Cunningham, J.V. “The Problem of Form.” Twentieth-Century American Poetics: Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Dana Gioia, David Mason, and Meg Scho*rke. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2004.

---. “Several Kinds of Short Poem.” Poets on Poetry. Ed. Howard Nemerov. New York: Basic Books, 1966.

Dahlen, Beverly. “Statement for a Panel on Robert Duncan.” Civil Disobediences: Poetics and Politics in Action. Ed. Anne Waldman and Lisa Birman. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2004.

---. “Notes on Intention and Editing.” Civil Disobediences: Poetics and Politics in Action. Ed. Anne Waldman and Lisa Birman. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2004.

---. “Statement for Panel on Gender.” Civil Disobediences: Poetics and Politics in Action. Ed. Anne Waldman and Lisa Birman. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2004.

---. “Forbidden Knowledge.” A Guide to Poetics Journal: Writing in the Expanded Field 1982-1998. Ed. Lyn Hejinian & Barrett Watten. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2013. 55-71. "The technique of freely associating ideas and images has been adopted by many writers as a method of composition since Freud first developed it in the context of psychoanalytic practice. There is by now a rather long history of its use, in one way or another, by modernist writers and artists" (56).

Dalí, Salvador. “Yellow Manifesto.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “Photography, Pure Creation of the Mind.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Daly, Lew. From “Ends Irrespective of (the limits of) Their Means, or: Further From Closure Than Any Process, Freeing Other From Form (an ongoing essay in response to questions posed by Pam Rehm).” A Poetics of Criticism. Edited by Juliana Spahr, Mark Wallace, Kristin Prevallet, and Pam Rehm. Buffalo: Leave Books, 1994. 187-196.

Damon, Maria. “Poet-Literary Poetry, Counterperformance, and Micropoetries.” Poetry & Pedagogy: The Challenge of the Contemporary. Ed. Joan Retallack and Juliana Spahr. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2006.

---. “‘Unmeaning Jargon’/Uncanonized Beatitude: Bob Kaufman, Poet.” Artifice & Indeterminacy: An Anthology of New Poetics. Ed. Christopher Beach. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1998.

---. “Tell Them about Us: Some Poems from Southie.” Poetry and Cultural Studies: A Reader. Edited by Maria Damon and Ira Livingston. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2009. 147-160.

Damrosch, David. "Love in the Necropolis." The Lyric Theory Reader: A Critical Anthology. Ed. Virginia Jackson and Yopie Prins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014. 632-641.

Dana, Robert. Untitled essay on an Ars Poetica. What Will Suffice: Contemporary American Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Christopher Buckley and Christopher Merrill. Salt Lake City: Gibbs Smith, 1997.

Daniel, Samuel. “A Defence of Ryme.” The Prelude to Poetry: The English Poets in Defence and Praise of Their Own Art. Ed. Ernest Rhys. London: J.M. Dent, 1927.

Dao, Bei. "About Today." Translated by Perry Link. Cross Worlds: Transcultural Poetics: An Anthology. Ed. Anne Waldman & Laura Wright. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2014. 306-310.

Darragh, Tina. “Howe.” In the American Tree. Ed. Ron Silliman. Orono, ME: National Poetry Foundation, 1986.

---. “Procedure.” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

Darras, Jacques. “Beyond Romanticism.” Active Romanticism: The Radical Impulse in Nineteenth-Century and Contemporary Poetic Practice. Ed. Julie Carr and Jeffrey C. Robinson. Tuscaloosa, AL: University of Alabama Press, 2015. 228-233.

Davenport, Guy. “Balthus.” Poets on Painters: Essays on the Art of Painting by Twentieth-Century Poets. Edited by J.D. McClatchy. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988. 233-245.

Davidson, Michael. “Answering Motion.” Code of Signals: Recent Writings in Poetics. Ed. Michael Palmer. Berkeley: North Atlantic Books, 1983.

---. Untitled. The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

---. “‘Skewed by Design’: From Act to Speech Act in Language Writing.” Artifice & Indeterminacy: An Anthology of New Poetics. Ed. Christopher Beach. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1998.

---. “Cave of Resemblances, Cave of Rimes: Tradition and Repetition in Robert Duncan.” Conversant Essays: Contemporary Poets on Poetry. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1990. 282-294.

---. “The Material Page.” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 71-79.

---. “'Hey Man, My Wave!' The Authority of Private Language.” A Guide to Poetics Journal: Writing in the Expanded Field 1982-1998. Ed. Lyn Hejinian & Barrett Watten. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2013. 202-214. "We may agree with Pascal that the heart has its reasons which reason does not know, but at this point in history we might add that the language of the heart, in order to speak at all, must first deform the language of reason" (202).

Davie, Donald. “What is Modern Poetry?” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

---. “The Reek of the Human.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

Davies, Alan. “Private Enigma in the Opened Text.” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

---. “‘This predilection…’” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

---. Untitled. The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

---. "Language/Mind/Writing." A Guide to Poetics Journal: Writing in the Expanded Field 1982-1998. Ed. Lyn Hejinian & Barrett Watten. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2013. 72-78. "A language is any gesture which the mind repeats in order to understand itself" (72).

Davies, Jeremy M. "The Pleasure of Perversity." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 46-49.

Day, Ron. “‘Before me . . .’” A Poetics of Criticism. Edited by Juliana Spahr, Mark Wallace, Kristin Prevallet, and Pam Rehm. Buffalo: Leave Books, 1994. 54-57. "Words that can't be stolen. Words that cut space and duplicate it like a shuffle, from the inside out" (54).

de Andrade, Mario. “Extremely Interesting Preface (excerpt).” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

de Campos, Augusto. “Concrete Poetry: A Manifesto.” Contemporary Poetics. Ed. Louis Armand. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2007. 213-214. “ – the concrete poet does not turn away from words, he does not glance at them obliquely: he goes directly to their center, in order to live and vivify their facility” (213).

---. “Questionnaire of the Yale Symposium.” Contemporary Poetics. Ed. Louis Armand. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2007. 215-219. “Concrete poets may be differentiated from other experiences (zaum, lettrism, phonetic poetry) for not rejecting semantic values but rather placing them on equal footing with other material, visual, an sonorous parameters of the poem” (217).

de Chirico, Giorgio. “On Metaphysical Art (excerpt).” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “Statues, Furniture, and Generals.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

de Kooning, Willem. “What Abstract Art Means to Me.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

de la Serna, Ramón Gómez [Tristán]. “Futurist Proclamation to the Spaniards.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

de la Torre, Mónica. "What is the Light?: Reflections on Other Worlds." Cross Worlds: Transcultural Poetics: An Anthology. Ed. Anne Waldman & Laura Wright. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2014. 207-211.

de Man, Paul. “Intentional Structure of the Romantic Image.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

---. "Anthropomorphism and Trope in the Lyric." The Lyric Theory Reader: A Critical Anthology. Ed. Virginia Jackson and Yopie Prins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014. 291-304.

de Montaigne, Michel. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 61.

de Saint-Point, Valentine. “Manifesto of Futurist Woman…” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001. ---. “Futurist Manifesto of Lust.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001. “Art and war are the great manifestations of sensuality; lust is their flower” (71).

de Tocqueville, Alexis. “Of Some of the Sources of Poetry Among Democratic Nations.” American Poetry and Poetics: Poems and Critical Documents from the Puritans to Robert Frost. Edited by Daniel G. Hoffman. New York: Anchor Books, 1962.

de Vree, Paul. “Declaration.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Debord, Guy. “All The King’s Men.” Poems for the Millennium: The University of California Book of Modern & Postmodern Poetry. Volume Two: From Postwar to Millennium. Ed. Jerome Rothenberg and Pierre Joris. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998.

Delany, Samuel R. and Karen Tei Yamash*ta and Nina Zivančević. "Horizons of Expectation: Panel on Prose Translation." Cross Worlds: Transcultural Poetics: An Anthology. Ed. Anne Waldman & Laura Wright. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2014. 123-135.

--- and Hoa Nguyen, Meredith Quartermain, James Thomas Stevens. "Telling Stories." Cross Worlds: Transcultural Poetics: An Anthology. Ed. Anne Waldman & Laura Wright. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2014. 247-257.

Delaunay, Robert. “Light.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “Historical Notes on Painting…” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “Simultaneism in Contemporary Modern Art, Painting, Poetry.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Delaunay, Sonia. “The Future of Fashion.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “The Issue.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Deleuze, Gilles and Felix Guattari. “What Is a Minor Literature?” Poetry and Cultural Studies: A Reader. Edited by Maria Damon and Ira Livingston. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2009. 56-60.

Dennie, Joseph. “Freneau’s Poems.” American Poetry and Poetics: Poems and Critical Documents from the Puritans to Robert Frost. Edited by Daniel G. Hoffman. New York: Anchor Books, 1962.

Derksen, Jeff. “Unrecognizable Texts…” Telling It Slant: Avant-Garde Poetics of the 1990s. Ed. Mark Wallace & Steven Marks. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2001. 145-159. “The text, itself a matrix of social relations in its production and circulation, is one such liminal space. The writing of ‘multicultural’ subjects – and texts read as multicultural (for reception is a production as well) – are produced from a variety of positions, ranging from assertions of a politics of recognition, the disarticulatory practice of resistance, to an antisystemic rearticulation of the sites and effects of multiculturalism itself” (150).

--- and Lisa Robertson, Nancy Shaw, Catriona Strang. “Coasting.” A Poetics of Criticism. Edited by Juliana Spahr, Mark Wallace, Kristin Prevallet, and Pam Rehm. Buffalo: Leave Books, 1994. 301-303.

Derrida, Jacque. “Structure, Sign, and Play…” Criticism: Major Statements. Ed. Charles Kaplan & William Anderson. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1991.

---. “Che cos’è la poesia?” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

---. “Edmond Jabes and the Question of the Book.” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 84-98.

Devota, Dot. Untitled Poetics Statement. The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 67. "Writing is not writing but thinking" (67).

Dewdney, Christopher. “Fractal Diffusion.” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

Dhompa, Tsering Wangmo. Untitled Poetics Statement. The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 75. "In poetry, uncertainty became something of an asset" (75).

Di Prima, Diane. “from ‘Rant.’” Poems for the Millennium: The University of California Book of Modern & Postmodern Poetry. Volume Two: From Postwar to Millennium. Ed. Jerome Rothenberg and Pierre Joris. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998.

---. “Light / and Keats.” Talking Poetics from Naropa Institute: Annals of the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics. Volume 1. Ed. Anne Waldman and Marilyn Webb. Boulder: Shambhala, 1978.

---. “By Any Means Necessary.” Beats at Naropa. Ed. Anne Waldman and Laura Wright. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2009.

Dickey, James. “The Poet Turns on Himself.” Poets on Poetry. Ed. Howard Nemerov. New York: Basic Books, 1966.

Dickinson, Emily. “On Her Poems.” The McGraw Hill Book of Poetry. Edited by Robert DiYanni and Kraft Rompf. New York: McGraw Hill, 1993.

---. Letters to Thomas Wentworth Higginson. Toward the Open Field: Poets on the Art of Poetry 1800-1950. Ed. Melissa Kwasny. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2004.

---. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 29.

Dickison, Steve. “For a Minor Art: Publishing & Poetry.” Civil Disobediences: Poetics and Politics in Action. Ed. Anne Waldman and Lisa Birman. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2004.

Diggs, LaTasha N. Nevada. "no te entiendo." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 50-52.

Dinh, Linh. “What I Usually Say to My Students.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.

---. "The Deluge: Contemporary Vietnamese Poetry." Cross Worlds: Transcultural Poetics: An Anthology. Ed. Anne Waldman & Laura Wright. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2014. 212-227.

DiPalma, Ray. “Tying and Untying.” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

DiPietra, Amber and Jen Hofer and Denise Leto. "as rigorous as a mathematical demonstration, as surprising as an ambush in the night, and as elevated as a star: Some Thoughts on Access, Difficulty, Limestone, and Empire." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 53-62.

Dobyns, Stephen. “Metaphor and the Authenticating Act of Memory.” Poetics: Essays on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Paul Mariani and George Murphy. Ocean Bluff, MA: Tendril Magazine, 1984. 194-216.

Doller, Ben. “Different Language.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.

Doller, Sandra. “A Po Pedagogy.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.

Dorantes, Dolores and Jen Hofer. "Great Divides and Common Ground." Cross Worlds: Transcultural Poetics: An Anthology. Ed. Anne Waldman & Laura Wright. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2014. 311-314.

Doris, Stacy. “I Have to Check My e-mail.” American Poets in the 21st Century: The New Poetics. Edited by Claudia Rankine and Lisa Sewell. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2007.

Dorn, Edward. “What I See in the Maximus Poems.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

---. “Strumming Language.” Talking Poetics from Naropa Institute: Annals of the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics. Volume 1. Ed. Anne Waldman and Marilyn Webb. Boulder: Shambhala, 1978.

Douglas, Keith. “Poetry is like a man.” Strong Words: Modern Poets on Modern Poetry. Edited by W.N. Herbert and Matthew Hollis. Northumberland: Bloodaxe, 2000. 113-114.

Dove, Rita. Untitled Essay on a poem. Ecstatic Occasions, Expedient Forms: 85 Leading Contemporary Poets Select and Comment on Their Poems. Ed. David Lehman. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2001.

---. Untitled essay on an Ars Poetica. What Will Suffice: Contemporary American Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Christopher Buckley and Christopher Merrill. Salt Lake City: Gibbs Smith, 1997.

--- and Marilyn Nelson. “A Black Rainbow…” Twentieth-Century American Poetics: Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Dana Gioia, David Mason, and Meg Scho*rke. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2004.

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---. “Hypergraphy: A Note on Maurice Lemaître's Roman Hypergraphique.” A Guide to Poetics Journal: Writing in the Expanded Field 1982-1998. Ed. Lyn Hejinian & Barrett Watten. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2013. 215-224. "The fetish is the private face of the public life, and the public object of the private pleasure. The desire to look is what ensures the letters their life in both domains" (223).

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---. Untitled essay on an Ars Poetica. What Will Suffice: Contemporary American Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Christopher Buckley and Christopher Merrill. Salt Lake City: Gibbs Smith, 1997.

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---. "Eros Breathing." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 63-65.

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--- and Anne Waldman and John Oughton. “‘A Little Endarkenment: and in my poetry you find me.’” Civil Disobediences: Poetics and Politics in Action. Ed. Anne Waldman and Lisa Birman. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2004.

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---. “The Pink Guitar.” Artifice & Indeterminacy: An Anthology of New Poetics. Ed. Christopher Beach. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1998.

---. “HOO, HOO, HOO: Some Episodes in the Construction of Modern Male Whiteness. Poetry and Cultural Studies: A Reader. Edited by Maria Damon and Ira Livingston. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2009. 310-329.

---. “Singing Schools and ‘Mental Equality’: An Essay in Three Parts.” Active Romanticism: The Radical Impulse in Nineteenth-Century and Contemporary Poetic Practice. Ed. Julie Carr and Jeffrey C. Robinson. Tuscaloosa, AL: University of Alabama Press, 2015. 47-69.

Duras, Marguerite. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 31.

Dworkin, Craig. “Seja Marginal.” The Consequence of Innovation: 21st Century Poetics. Edited by Craig Dworkin. New York: Roof Books, 2008. 7-24.

---. "Lyric and the Hazard of Music." The Lyric Theory Reader: A Critical Anthology. Ed. Virginia Jackson and Yopie Prins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014. 499-503.

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---. Untitled essay on a poem. Fifty Contemporary Poets: The Creative Process. Ed. Alberta T. Turner. New York: David McKay Co., 1977.

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---. Untitled essay on a poem. Fifty Contemporary Poets: The Creative Process. Ed. Alberta T. Turner. New York: David McKay Co., 1977.

---. “Image and Language.” A Field Guide to Contemporary Poetry and Poetics. Revised Edition. Ed. Stuart Friebert, David Walker, and David Young. Oberlin, OH: Oberlin College Press, 1997.

Eich, Günter. “some Remarks on ‘Literature and Reality.’” A Field Guide to Contemporary Poetry and Poetics. Revised Edition. Ed. Stuart Friebert, David Walker, and David Young. Oberlin, OH: Oberlin College Press, 1997.

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---. Untitled. The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

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Eliot, T.S. “Reflections on Vers Libre.” Twentieth-Century American Poetics: Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Dana Gioia, David Mason, and Meg Scho*rke. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2004.

---. “Tradition and the Individual Talent.” Twentieth-Century American Poetics: Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Dana Gioia, David Mason, and Meg Scho*rke. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2004.

---. “Hamlet and His Problems.” Criticism: Major Statements. Ed. Charles Kaplan & William Anderson. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1991.

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---. "The Three Voices of Poetry." The Lyric Theory Reader: A Critical Anthology. Ed. Virginia Jackson and Yopie Prins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014. 192-200.

---. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 35.

---. “The Metaphysical Poets.” Prose Keys to Modern Poetry. Edited by Karl Shapiro. Evanston: Row Peterson & Co., 1962. 57-65.

Elizabeth, Nicolle. "Take the Story." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 66-68.

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---. “The Automatic Message.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

---. “Useful Man.” The Book, Spiritual Instrument. Edited by Jerome Rothenburg and David Guss. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 135.

Emerson, Ralph Waldo. “From Nature.” American Poetry and Poetics: Poems and Critical Documents from the Puritans to Robert Frost. Edited by Daniel G. Hoffman. New York: Anchor Books, 1962.

---. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 37.

---. “The Poet.” American Poetry and Poetics: Poems and Critical Documents from the Puritans to Robert Frost. Edited by Daniel G. Hoffman. New York: Anchor Books, 1962.

Empson, William. “Seven Types of Ambiguity.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

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---. “Speech Delivered at a Banquet…” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “Speech Delivered at His Exhibition…” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Ensslin John. “Schizophrenic Writing.” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

Enzensberger, Hans Magnus. “A Modest Proposal.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

Erdman, David V. From “ ‘Introduction’ to the Illuminated Blake.” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 107-111.

Eshleman, Clayton. “Three Chapters from Novices.” Conversant Essays: Contemporary Poets on Poetry. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1990. 104-118.

---. "Genesis & Praxis." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 69-73.

Espaillat, Rhina. “Bilingual…” Twentieth-Century American Poetics: Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Dana Gioia, David Mason, and Meg Scho*rke. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2004.

Estrin, Jerry. “Cold Heaven: The Uses of Monumentality.” A Guide to Poetics Journal: Writing in the Expanded Field 1982-1998. Ed. Lyn Hejinian & Barrett Watten. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2013. 326-334. "How does one write in relation to this urban landscape? I read the city and I read its culture industry from the perspective of historical critique and I use this critique in a duel with appropriated motivation" (326).

Evans, Steve. “Introduction to Writing from the New Coast.” Telling It Slant: Avant-Garde Poetics of the 1990s. Ed. Mark Wallace & Steven Marks. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2001. 11-20. “And so it is that this ‘writing from the new coast’ – aspiring to be a force in a world coasting with alarming speed to the new right, where xenophobic nativism thinks in more and more peoples’ heads and determines the direction in which they will turn their more and more sophisticated weaponry – comes to propose poetry as a practice of nonidentity, a means of rescuing the kernel of emergence at the core of our emergency” (15).

---. “Free (Market) Verse.” The Consequence of Innovation: 21st Century Poetics. Edited by Craig Dworkin. New York: Roof Books, 2008. 25-36.

Evenson, Brian. "Crazy Party Guy, or, a Disruption of Smooth Surfaces." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 74-75.

Everson, William. “The Poem as Icon – Reflections on Printing as a Fine Art.” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 50-53.

Exavier, Diane. “Feeling Colored.” The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. Ed. Claudia Rankine, Beth Loffreda, & Max King Cap. Albany, NY: Fence Books, 2015. 205-207.

Fanthrope, U.A. “War, Poetry, The Child.” Strong Words: Modern Poets on Modern Poetry. Edited by W.N. Herbert and Matthew Hollis. Northumberland: Bloodaxe, 2000. 208-210.

Faulkner, William. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 39.

Fawcett, Brian. “Agent of Language.” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

Felman, Shoshana. “The Poe-etic Effect.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

Feinstein, Elaine. “A Question of Voice.” Strong Words: Modern Poets on Modern Poetry. Edited by W.N. Herbert and Matthew Hollis. Northumberland: Bloodaxe, 2000. 188-189.

Fenollosa, Ernest. “The Chinese Written Character as…” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

Ferlinghetti, Lawrence. “Untitled.” The New American Poetry 1945-1960. Ed. Donald Allen. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2000.

---. “Genesis of After the Cries of the Birds.” The Poetics of The New American Poetry. Edited by Donald Allen and Warren Tallman. New York: Grove Press, 1973.

---. Untitled essay on collaboration. Beats at Naropa. Ed. Anne Waldman and Laura Wright. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2009.

---. “From the Gone World.” Civil Disobediences: Poetics and Politics in Action. Ed. Anne Waldman and Lisa Birman. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2004.

Fernandez, Jonathan. “Sensuality and a Western Tradition.” A Poetics of Criticism. Edited by Juliana Spahr, Mark Wallace, Kristin Prevallet, and Pam Rehm. Buffalo: Leave Books, 1994. 263-270.

Finch, Annie. “Coherent Decentering: Toward a New Model of the Poetic Self.” After Confession: Poetry as Autobiography. Saint Paul: Graywolf Press, 2001. 137-143.

Fink, Thomas. "Problems of Context and the Will to Parsimony: Reading 'Difficult' Recent U.S. Poetry." Reading the Difficulties: Dialogues with Contemporary American Innovative Poetry. Ed. Thomas Fink and Judith Halden-Sullivan. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2014. 157-177. "Even conscious need and desire do not necessarily preside over individual interpretation; reading can be influenced by forces beyond a reader's control" (158).

--- and Judith Halden-Sullivan. "Reading the Difficulties." Reading the Difficulties: Dialogues with Contemporary American Innovative Poetry. Ed. Thomas Fink and Judith Halden-Sullivan. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2014. 1-14. "What is a 'difficult' poem?" (1).

Finlay, Alec. “Afterword to Little Sparta. A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 467-469.

Fish, Stanley. "How to Recognize a Poem When You See One." The Lyric Theory Reader: A Critical Anthology. Ed. Virginia Jackson and Yopie Prins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014. 77-85.

Fisher, Allen. “Traps or Tools and Damage.” Contemporary Poetics. Ed. Louis Armand. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2007. 348-371. “Traps are what we are all inside of, traps constitute what is known, where to place what is known, between what boundaries…Tools are used by a range of animals and humans to encourage improvement in their condition” (349).

Fishman, Lisa. “A Note on Derrida and Teaching Poetry.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.

Flint, F.S. “Imagisme.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Follain, Jean. “Meanings of Poetry.” A Field Guide to Contemporary Poetry and Poetics. Revised Edition. Ed. Stuart Friebert, David Walker, and David Young. Oberlin, OH: Oberlin College Press, 1997.

Foley, Jack. “What About All This…” Twentieth-Century American Poetics: Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Dana Gioia, David Mason, and Meg Scho*rke. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2004.

Fontana, Lucio and others. “Manifesto of Spatialist Art.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Foust, Graham. Untitled Poetics Statement. The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2014. 81-82. "I also like to think of poetry as a place where the unknown can remain more or less intact, and I think that the best poems both collect and do without just enough evidence so as to give simultaneous rise to both intelligence and talk" (81).

Ford, Ford Madox. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 41.

Foreman, Richard. “Trying To Be Centered…” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

Forrest-Thomson, Veronica. “Continuity in Language.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

Fraser, Kathleen. “Artist’s Statement.” Lyric Postmodernisms: An Anthology of Contemporary Innovative Poetries. Edited by Reginald Shepherd. Denver: Counterpath Press, 2008.

Frazer, Sir James. From “The Golden Bough.” Prose Keys to Modern Poetry. Edited by Karl Shapiro. Evanston: Row Peterson & Co., 1962. 72-75.

Freud, Sigmund. “Creative Writers and Day-Dreaming.” Criticism: Major Statements. Ed. Charles Kaplan & William Anderson. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1991.

Friedlander, Benjamin. “from ‘Jetting I Commit the Immortal Spark.’” Telling It Slant: Avant-Garde Poetics of the 1990s. Ed. Mark Wallace & Steven Marks. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2001. 301-319. “If words could mean one thing only, if they did our bidding, they would indeed be mere slaves of sense, and sense our tool; but once we deign to notice their ambiguity, the reign of language is established. Words set themselves over us and dictate our affairs. We find ourselves in the midst of an erotic game, a theater of cruelty that takes its cues from history. We find ourselves in a relationship with power” (301-302).

Frost, Carol. Untitled essay on an Ars Poetica. What Will Suffice: Contemporary American Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Christopher Buckley and Christopher Merrill. Salt Lake City: Gibbs Smith, 1997.

---. “Self-Pity.” After Confession: Poetry as Autobiography. Saint Paul: Graywolf Press, 2001. 162-175.

Frost, Robert. “The Sound of Sense.” Twentieth-Century American Poetics: Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Dana Gioia, David Mason, and Meg Scho*rke. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2004.

---. “The Figure a Poem Makes.” Twentieth-Century American Poetics: Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Dana Gioia, David Mason, and Meg Scho*rke. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2004.

---. “Sentence Sounds.” Modern Poets on Modern Poetry. Ed. James Scully. London: McGraw Hill, 1966.

Frye, Northrop. “The Archetypes of Literature.” Criticism: Major Statements. Ed. Charles Kaplan & William Anderson. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1991.

---. "Theory of Genres." The Lyric Theory Reader: A Critical Anthology. Ed. Virginia Jackson and Yopie Prins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014. 30-39.

Fulton, Alice. “Of Formal, Free, and Fractal Verse…” Twentieth-Century American Poetics: Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Dana Gioia, David Mason, and Meg Scho*rke. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2004.

Funkhouser, Christopher. “A cyber-Editor’s statement.” Telling It Slant: Avant-Garde Poetics of the 1990s. Ed. Mark Wallace & Steven Marks. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2001. 131-144. “One might posit that it was a function of the ‘nature’ of ‘poets’ to define themselves by virtue of their words printed on paper. A defining shift has since occurred. Methods have evolved, and many poets around the glop have begun to conceive and present their work in a paperless space via computer” (131).

Fussell, Paul. “Free Verse.” Antaeus. Poetry & Poetics. Summer / Autumn, 1978. Vol. 30/31.

---. “The Historical Dimension.” The Structure of Verse: Modern Essays on Prosody. Ed. Harvey Gross. New York: Ecco Press, 1979.

Gabbert, Elisa. “The Moves: Common Maneuvers in Contemporary Poetry.” The Monkey & The Wrench: Essays Into Contemporary Poetics. Akron, OH: University of Akron Press, 2011.

Gabo, Naum and Antoine Pevsner. “The Realistic Manifesto.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Gaffarel, Jaques. “Celestial Alphabet Event.” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 345-346.

Galassi, Jonathan. “A Hymn of Non-Attainment: Dino Campana.” Conversant Essays: Contemporary Poets on Poetry. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1990. 248-252.

Gallagher, Tess. “Poem as Time Machine.” Claims for Poetry. Ed. Donald Hall. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000.

---. “The Poem as a Reservoir for Grief.” Poetics: Essays on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Paul Mariani and George Murphy. Ocean Bluff, MA: Tendril Magazine, 1984. 85-97.

Galvin, Brendan. “The Mumblings of Young Werther.” Poetics: Essays on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Paul Mariani and George Murphy. Ocean Bluff, MA: Tendril Magazine, 1984. 59-66.

---. “The Contemporary Poet and the Natural World.” After Confession: Poetry as Autobiography. Saint Paul: Graywolf Press, 2001. 197-213.

Gander, Forrest. “Notes on a Poetics.” Lyric Postmodernisms: An Anthology of Contemporary Innovative Poetries. Edited by Reginald Shepherd. Denver: Counterpath Press, 2008.

---. “The Box.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.

Garnier, Pierre and Ilse Garnier. “Spatial Eroticism.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Gates Jr., Henry Louis. “The Signifying Monkey and the Language of Signifyin(g): Rhetorical Difference and the Orders of Meaning.” Poetry and Cultural Studies: A Reader. Edited by Maria Damon and Ira Livingston. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2009. 90-115.

Gaynor, Christopher. “Speculations Through the Mirror…” Code of Signals: Recent Writings in Poetics. Ed. Michael Palmer. Berkeley: North Atlantic Books, 1983.

Gemin, Pamela. “Bless Me, Sisters.” After Confession: Poetry as Autobiography. Saint Paul: Graywolf Press, 2001. 233-243.

Genette, Gérard. “Poetic Language, Poetics of Language.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

---. "The Architext." The Lyric Theory Reader: A Critical Anthology. Ed. Virginia Jackson and Yopie Prins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014. 17-30.

Gevirtz, Susan. “Without Event: The Reign of Commotion.” A Poetics of Criticism. Edited by Juliana Spahr, Mark Wallace, Kristin Prevallet, and Pam Rehm. Buffalo: Leave Books, 1994. 9-19. "No events: only a purely physical sense" (10).

Gilbert, Alan. “Form and Culture.” Civil Disobediences: Poetics and Politics in Action. Ed. Anne Waldman and Lisa Birman. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2004.

---. “Adding Up to Plural: On the Work of Roberto Tejada.” The Consequence of Innovation: 21st Century Poetics. Edited by Craig Dworkin. New York: Roof Books, 2008. 233-241.

Gilbert, Jack. “The Landscape of American Poetry in 1964.” Poets on Poetry. Ed. Howard Nemerov. New York: Basic Books, 1966.

Gilbert, Sandra M. “My Name is Darkness: The Poetry of Self-Definition.” Claims for Poetry. Ed. Donald Hall. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000.

---. “Revolutionary Love: Denise Levertov and the Poetics of Politics.” Conversant Essays: Contemporary Poets on Poetry. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1990. 269-281.

--- and Susan Gubar. "Gender, Creativity, and the Woman Poet." The Lyric Theory Reader: A Critical Anthology. Ed. Virginia Jackson and Yopie Prins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014. 522-529.

Gildner, Gary. Untitled essay on a poem. Fifty Contemporary Poets: The Creative Process. Ed. Alberta T. Turner. New York: David McKay Co., 1977.

Ginsberg, Allen. “Notes for Howl.” The New American Poetry 1945-1960. Ed. Donald Allen. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2000.

---. “When the Mode of the Music Changes.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

---. “Abstraction in Poetry.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

---. “Introduction to Gasoline.” The Poetics of The New American Poetry. Edited by Donald Allen and Warren Tallman. New York: Grove Press, 1973.

---. “When the Mode of the Music Changes…” The Poetics of The New American Poetry. Edited by Donald Allen and Warren Tallman. New York: Grove Press, 1973.

---. “Poetry, Violence, and the Trembling Lambs.” The Poetics of The New American Poetry. Edited by Donald Allen and Warren Tallman. New York: Grove Press, 1973.

---. “Prose Contribution to Cuban Revolution.” The Poetics of The New American Poetry. Edited by Donald Allen and Warren Tallman. New York: Grove Press, 1973.

---. “How Kaddish Happened.” The Poetics of The New American Poetry. Edited by Donald Allen and Warren Tallman. New York: Grove Press, 1973.

---. “Some Metamorphoses of Personal Poetry.” The Poetics of The New American Poetry. Edited by Donald Allen and Warren Tallman. New York: Grove Press, 1973.

---. “On Improvised Poetics.” The Poetics of The New American Poetry. Edited by Donald Allen and Warren Tallman. New York: Grove Press, 1973.

---. “Introduction.” Talking Poetics from Naropa Institute: Annals of the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics. Volume One. Ed. Anne Waldman and Marilyn Webb. Boulder: Shambhala, 1978.

---. “Visions of Ordinary Mind: (1948-1955): Discourse w/ Questions & Answers.” Talking Poetics from Naropa Institute: Annals of the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics. Volume Two. Ed. Anne Waldman and Marilyn Webb. Boulder: Shambhala, 1978.

---. 2 untitled pieces on Blake. Beats at Naropa. Ed. Anne Waldman and Laura Wright. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2009.

---. “Revolutionary Poetics.” Civil Disobediences: Poetics and Politics in Action. Ed. Anne Waldman and Lisa Birman. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2004.

---. Essay. Towards a New American Poetics: Essays & Interviews. Edited by Ekbert Faas. Santa Barbara: Black Sparrow Press, 1979. 249-268.

---. "Spontaneous Poetics: Australian Aboriginal Song Sticks." Cross Worlds: Transcultural Poetics: An Anthology. Ed. Anne Waldman & Laura Wright. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2014. 6-12. "We were talking earlier about poetry as communal sacred dance and epic" (6).

--- and Helen Adam. “On the Ballad.” Civil Disobediences: Poetics and Politics in Action. Ed. Anne Waldman and Lisa Birman. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2004.

Gioia, Dana. “Can Poetry Matter?” Twentieth-Century American Poetics: Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Dana Gioia, David Mason, and Meg Scho*rke. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2004.

---. “Notes on the New Formalism.” Conversant Essays: Contemporary Poets on Poetry. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1990. 175-184.

Giscombe, C.S., “Fugitive.” Telling It Slant: Avant-Garde Poetics of the 1990s. Ed. Mark Wallace & Steven Marks. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2001. 367-375. “There was a promise &, later on, an almost natural letdown around a TV show, an old series from the early 1960s called The Fugitive: the promise – what seemed to be happening and so, for a long period, was happening – was endless expansion & accumulation w/no particular regard to narrative structure (only the briefest and most token attention was paid to this by the show’s producers): what we saw instead of such a structure was the suggestion of an infinite articulation – not ‘utterance or enunciation’ but something like the way those long steam locomotives were jointed to take curves” (367).

---. “Poetry and the Oblique.” Lyric Postmodernisms: An Anthology of Contemporary Innovative Poetries. Edited by Reginald Shepherd. Denver: Counterpath Press, 2008.

---. “Sonnet Talk.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.

---. Untitled Poetics Statement. The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 89-90. "...the best job prose can have is describing poetry" (90).

Gizzi, Peter. “Extracts from a Letter to Steve Farmer.” American Poets in the 21st Century: The New Poetics. Edited by Claudia Rankine and Lisa Sewell. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2007.

---. “Artist’s Statement.” Lyric Postmodernisms: An Anthology of Contemporary Innovative Poetries. Edited by Reginald Shepherd. Denver: Counterpath Press, 2008.

---. “In Thought a Fine Human Brow Is Like the East When Troubled with the Morning.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.

---. “Correspondences of the Book.” A Poetics of Criticism. Edited by Juliana Spahr, Mark Wallace, Kristin Prevallet, and Pam Rehm. Buffalo: Leave Books, 1994. 179-186.

Gladman, Renee. Untitled Poetics Statement. The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 97. "I wanted to launch my small country into a world so crowded with countries that many hundreds went about in complete obscurity" (97).

Glazer, Michelle. “Artist’s Statement.” The Iowa Anthology of New American Poetries. Ed. by Reginald Shepherd. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2004.

Glenum, Lara. “Theory of the Gurlesque…” Gurlesque. Ed. Glenum & Greenberg. Philadelphia: Saturnalia Books, 2010.

---. “Language Is the Site of Our Collective Infection.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.

Glissant, Edouard. “from ‘Earth.’” Poems for the Millennium: The University of California Book of Modern & Postmodern Poetry. Volume Two: From Postwar to Millennium. Ed. Jerome Rothenberg and Pierre Joris. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998.

Glück, Louise. “Description, Hesitation, Silence” Twentieth-Century American Poetry Ed. Gioia, et al.

---. Untitled essay on a poem. Fifty Contemporary Poets: The Creative Process. Ed. Alberta T. Turner. New York: David McKay Co., 1977.

---. “The Forbidden.” After Confession: Poetry as Autobiography. Saint Paul: Graywolf Press, 2001. 244-253.

Glück, Robert. “His heart Is a Lute Held Up: Poe and Bataille.” A Guide to Poetics Journal: Writing in the Expanded Field 1982-1998. Ed. Lyn Hejinian & Barrett Watten. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2013. 79-86. "Like gossip, this pleasure is based on a manipulation/transgression of shared codes and a continuum of experience" (80).

Golding, Alan. “‘Isn’t the Avant-garde Always Pedagogical’: Experimental Poetics and/as Pedagogy.” Poetry & Pedagogy: The Challenge of the Contemporary. Ed. Joan Retallack and Juliana Spahr. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2006.

Goldman, Judith. “Dysachrony: Temporalities and Their Discontents, in New and Old Romanticisms.” Active Romanticism: The Radical Impulse in Nineteenth-Century and Contemporary Poetic Practice. Ed. Julie Carr and Jeffrey C. Robinson. Tuscaloosa, AL: University of Alabama Press, 2015. 145-175.

Goldsmith, Kenneth. “Being Boring.” American Poets in the 21st Century: The New Poetics. Edited by Claudia Rankine and Lisa Sewell. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2007.

---. “Uncreative Writing.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.

---. “A Week of Blogs for the Poetry Foundation.” The Consequence of Innovation: 21st Century Poetics. Edited by Craig Dworkin. New York: Roof Books, 2008. 137-149.

Göransson, Johannes. "It's Still Too Much: Conceptual Poetry, the Poetry Foundation, the Plague Ground, and the Anti-Kitsch Rhetoric of Contemporary Poetry Discussions." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 76-83.

Gordon, Noah Eli. "Five Allegories to Turn the Five Fingers of the Right Hand into a Fist." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 84-87.

---. Untitled Poetics Statement. The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 105. "I hope my poems take root in the silence after the two have sounded: mimetic chatter and babble moving paradoxically from intellection to imagination" (105).

Gottlieb, Michael. “Googling Flarf.” The Consequence of Innovation: 21st Century Poetics. Edited by Craig Dworkin. New York: Roof Books, 2008. 199-203.

Gourgouris, Stathis. "The Lyric in Exile." The Lyric Theory Reader: A Critical Anthology. Ed. Virginia Jackson and Yopie Prins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014. 368-381.

Graal-Arelsky [Stepan Stpanovich Petrov]. “Egopoetry in Poetry.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “The Tables.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Graham, David. “Voluminous Underwear; or, Why I Write Self-Portraits.” After Confession: Poetry as Autobiography. Saint Paul: Graywolf Press, 2001. 95-103.

Graham, Jorie. “At the Border.” “Poetic Statement.” American Women Poets in the 21st Century. Edited by Claudia Rankine and Juliana Spahr. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2002.

Graham, W.S. “Notes on a Poetry of Release.” Strong Words: Modern Poets on Modern Poetry. Edited by W.N. Herbert and Matthew Hollis. Northumberland: Bloodaxe, 2000. 117-121.

Grahn, Judy. “Drawing in Nets.” Conversant Essays: Contemporary Poets on Poetry. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1990. 101-103.

Graves, Robert. “Harp, Anvil, Oar.” The Structure of Verse: Modern Essays on Prosody. Ed. Harvey Gross. New York: Ecco Press, 1979.

---. From “Observations on Poetry 1922-1925.” Strong Words: Modern Poets on Modern Poetry. Edited by W.N. Herbert and Matthew Hollis. Northumberland: Bloodaxe, 2000. 39-43.

---. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 43.

--- and Laura Riding. “A Survey of Modernist Poetry.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

Gray, Thomas. “Metrum: Observations on English Metre.” The Prelude to Poetry: The English Poets in Defence and Praise of Their Own Art. Ed. Ernest Rhys. London: J.M. Dent, 1927.

Greenberg, Arielle. “Some Notes on…Gurlesque” Gurlesque. Ed. Glenum & Greenberg. Philadlphia. Philadelphia: Saturnalia Books, 2009.

---. “Hybridity in Gurlesque Poetry.” The Monkey & The Wrench: Essays Into Contemporary Poetics. Akron, OH: University of Akron Press, 2011.

---. “Response to Call for Writing about Race.” The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. Ed. Claudia Rankine, Beth Loffreda, & Max King Cap. Albany, NY: Fence Books, 2015. 79-82.

Greene, Roland. "Inter-American Obversals: Allen Ginsberg and Haroldo de Campos circa 1960." The Lyric Theory Reader: A Critical Anthology. Ed. Virginia Jackson and Yopie Prins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014. 618-632.

Greenfield, Richard. “The Image, Setting Forth Selfhood.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.

Grenier, Robert. “On Speech.” In the American Tree. Ed. Ron Silliman. Orono, ME: National Poetry Foundation, 1986.

---. “Notes on Coolidge, Objectives, Zukofsky, Romanticism…” In the American Tree. Ed. Ron Silliman. Orono, ME: National Poetry Foundation, 1986.

---. “‘Hedge-crickets Sing.’” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

Greenwald, Ted. “Spoken.” In the American Tree. Ed. Ron Silliman. Orono, ME: National Poetry Foundation, 1986.

Griaule, Marcel. From “Conversations with Ogotemmeli.” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 346.

Gridley, Sarah. “March Hares and Wild Trout: Against the Domestication of Poetry.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.

Griffiths, Rachel Eliza. "Iambic Passage: How Identity and Access Trouble American Imaginations." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 88-93.

Grossinger, Richard. “Mophogenesis.” Code of Signals: Recent Writings in Poetics. Ed. Michael Palmer. Berkeley: North Atlantic Books, 1983.

Grossman, Allen. "Summa Lyrica: A Primer of the Commonplaces in Speculative Poetics." The Lyric Theory Reader: A Critical Anthology. Ed. Virginia Jackson and Yopie Prins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014. 418-430.

Guest, Barbara. “The Forces of the Imagination.” American Women Poets in the 21st Century. Edited by Claudia Rankine and Juliana Spahr. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2002.

---. “A Reverie on the Making of a Poem.” Civil Disobediences: Poetics and Politics in Action. Ed. Anne Waldman and Lisa Birman. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2004.

Gunn, Thom. “Writing a Poem.” Strong Words: Modern Poets on Modern Poetry. Edited by W.N. Herbert and Matthew Hollis. Northumberland: Bloodaxe, 2000. 143-144.

H.D. “Epitaph.” The Poetics of The New American Poetry. Edited by Donald Allen and Warren Tallman. New York: Grove Press, 1973.

Hacker, Marilyn. “The Trees Win Every Time: Reading Julia Randall.” Conversant Essays: Contemporary Poets on Poetry. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1990. 328-336.

Hadas, Rachel. “On Bonnefoy.” Conversant Essays: Contemporary Poets on Poetry. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1990. 253-262.

Haines, John. “The Hole in the Bucket.” Claims for Poetry. Ed. Donald Hall. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000.

---. Untitled essay on a poem. Fifty Contemporary Poets: The Creative Process. Ed. Alberta T. Turner. New York: David McKay Co., 1977.

---. “Poems and Places.” American Poets in 1976. Ed. William Heyen. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1976.

---. “Further Reflections on the Line and the Poetic Voice.” A Field Guide to Contemporary Poetry and Poetics. Revised Edition. Ed. Stuart Friebert, David Walker, and David Young. Oberlin, OH: Oberlin College Press, 1997.

Hahn, Kimiko. “Blunt Instrument: A Zuihitsu.” After Confession: Poetry as Autobiography. Edited by Kate Sontag and David Graham. Saint Paul: Graywolf Press, 2001. 214-229.

---. “Poetics Statement: Still Writing the Body.” Eleven More American Women Poets in the 21st Century: Poetics Across North America. Ed. Claudia Rankine & Lisa Sewell. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2012. 107-110. "What I aim and hope for is poetry tat moves the reader. Away from the indifferent intertia—" (110).

Hall, Donald. “Poetry and Ambition.” Twentieth-Century American Poetics: Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Dana Gioia, David Mason, and Meg Scho*rke. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2004.

---. “Goatfoot, Milktongue, Twinbird.” Claims for Poetry. Ed. Donald Hall. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000.

---. Untitled essay on a poem. Fifty Contemporary Poets: The Creative Process. Ed. Alberta T. Turner. New York: David McKay Co., 1977.

---. Untitled essay on an Ars Poetica. What Will Suffice: Contemporary American Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Christopher Buckley and Christopher Merrill. Salt Lake City: Gibbs Smith, 1997.

---. “The Line.” A Field Guide to Contemporary Poetry and Poetics. Revised Edition. Ed. Stuart Friebert, David Walker, and David Young. Oberlin, OH: Oberlin College Press, 1997.

---. “Note on the Image: Body and Soul.” A Field Guide to Contemporary Poetry and Poetics. Revised Edition. Ed. Stuart Friebert, David Walker, and David Young. Oberlin, OH: Oberlin College Press, 1997.

Hall, James Allen. “Signing and Resigning.” The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. Ed. Claudia Rankine, Beth Loffreda, & Max King Cap. Albany, NY: Fence Books, 2015. 155-158.

Halle, Morris and Samuel J. Keyser. “The Iambic Pentameter.” The Structure of Verse: Modern Essays on Prosody. Ed. Harvey Gross. New York: Ecco Press, 1979.

Hamill, Sam. Untitled essay on an Ars Poetica. What Will Suffice: Contemporary American Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Christopher Buckley and Christopher Merrill. Salt Lake City: Gibbs Smith, 1997.

---. “Shadow Work.” Conversant Essays: Contemporary Poets on Poetry. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1990. 459-465.

Hamilton, Richard. “The Books of Di[e]ter Rot[h].” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 395-398.

Hansen, Jefferson. “Anarchism and Culture.” Telling It Slant: Avant-Garde Poetics of the 1990s. Ed. Mark Wallace & Steven Marks. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2001. 33-40. “It is not quite that simple.” Assume that culture and anarchism are two poles on a continuum. No poetic act of any value is wholly anarchistic or wholly cultural. Every poetic act embodies elements of both culture and anarchism” (33).

---. “Beyond Language to Words and Deeds.” A Poetics of Criticism. Edited by Juliana Spahr, Mark Wallace, Kristin Prevallet, and Pam Rehm. Buffalo: Leave Books, 1994. 125-131. "A popular argument is that language is the basis of the meaning of everything. It can be summarized as follows: since our only way of understanding anything, from the stars to our own fingers, is through the medium of language, then language is at the basis of all our understanding. Is there a way of describing or explaining, for instance, nature outside of language?" (125).

Hanzlicek, C.G. Untitled essay on an Ars Poetica. What Will Suffice: Contemporary American Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Christopher Buckley and Christopher Merrill. Salt Lake City: Gibbs Smith, 1997.

Harper, Michael S. Untitled essay on a poem. Fifty Contemporary Poets: The Creative Process. Ed. Alberta T. Turner. New York: David McKay Co., 1977.

Harrington, Joseph. “Poetry and the Public: The Social Form of Modern U.S. Poetics.” Poetry and Cultural Studies: A Reader. Edited by Maria Damon and Ira Livingston. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2009. 266-284.

Harris, Duriel E. "As Sound Creates Forms in Water." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 94-98.

Harris, Judith. “Breaking the Code of Silence: Ideology and Women’s Confessional Poetry.” After Confession: Poetry as Autobiography. Saint Paul: Graywolf Press, 2001. 254-268.

Harrison, Tony. “Poetry is all I write.” Strong Words: Modern Poets on Modern Poetry. Edited by W.N. Herbert and Matthew Hollis. Northumberland: Bloodaxe, 2000. 161-162.

Harryman, Carla. “Forward.” In the American Tree. Ed. Ron Silliman. Orono, ME: National Poetry Foundation, 1986.

---. “Toy Boats.” A Guide to Poetics Journal: Writing in the Expanded Field 1982-1998. Ed. Lyn Hejinian & Barrett Watten. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2013. 225-228. "I prefer to distribute narrative rather than deny it. The enemies of narrative are those who believe in it and those who deny it" (225).

---. "Avant-Garde Unconscious." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 99-101.

---. “Poetics Statement: Siren.” Eleven More American Women Poets in the 21st Century: Poetics Across North America. Ed. Claudia Rankine & Lisa Sewell. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2012. 136-142. "The writer is figured between history and now" (137).

Hartley, George. “Jameson's Perelman: Reification and the Material Signifier.” A Guide to Poetics Journal: Writing in the Expanded Field 1982-1998. Ed. Lyn Hejinian & Barrett Watten. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2013. 229-239. "Jameson's problem is the opposite of this--confusing poetic language with schizophrenic speech" (229).

Hartley, Marsden. “The Business of Poetry.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “On the Subject of Nativeness…” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “A Word.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “Art and Personal Life.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Hartman, Charles O. “Verse and Voice.” Conversant Essays: Contemporary Poets on Poetry. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1990. 132-140.

Harvey, Yona. "The Poetics of Self Education." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 102-105.

---. Untitled Poetics Statement. The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 111. "It's all unfinished business, really. But I love the struggle in me" (111).

Hausmann, Raoul. “B.T.B.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Harvey, Matthea. “Artist’s Statement.” The Iowa Anthology of New American Poetries. Ed. by Reginald Shepherd. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2004.

Hass, Robert. “One Body: Some Notes on Form.” Claims for Poetry. Ed. Donald Hall. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000.

---. “Images.” The McGraw Hill Book of Poetry. Edited by Robert DiYanni and Kraft Rompf. New York: McGraw Hill, 1993.

---. Untitled essay on an Ars Poetica. What Will Suffice: Contemporary American Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Christopher Buckley and Christopher Merrill. Salt Lake City: Gibbs Smith, 1997.

---. “Listening and Making.” Poetics: Essays on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Paul Mariani and George Murphy. Ocean Bluff, MA: Tendril Magazine, 1984. 158-177.

Hausmann, Raoul. “Manifesto of PREsentism.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Hawley, Anthony “Politics and the Porous Imagination.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.

Hayden, Robert. “Intro to Kaleidoscope…” Twentieth-Century American Poetics: Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Dana Gioia, David Mason, and Meg Scho*rke. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2004.

Hayes, Terrance. “The Poem as Animal or Machine.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.

Hayot, Eric. “On Teaching Students How to Read Poetry.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.

Heaney, Seamus. “Feelings into Words.” The Poet’s Work. Ed. Reginald Gibbons. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1979.

---. “The Redress of Poetry.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

---. “Craft and Technique.” Strong Words: Modern Poets on Modern Poetry. Edited by W.N. Herbert and Matthew Hollis. Northumberland: Bloodaxe, 2000. 158-160.

Heidegger, Martin. “Three Lectures on Poetry.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

---. "...Poetically Man Dwells..." The Lyric Theory Reader: A Critical Anthology. Ed. Virginia Jackson and Yopie Prins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014. 390-399.

Hejduk, John. “Thoughts of an Architect.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Hejinian, Lyn. “The Rejection of Closure.” A Guide to Poetics Journal: Writing in the Expanded Field 1982-1998. Ed. Lyn Hejinian & Barrett Watten. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2013. 87-97. "The 'open text,' by definition, is open to the world and particularly to the reader. It invites participation, rejects the authority of the writer over the reader and thus, by analogy, the authority implicit in other (social, economic, cultural) hierarchies" (88).

---. “For Change.” In the American Tree. Ed. Ron Silliman. Orono, ME: National Poetry Foundation, 1986.

---. “Variation: A Return of Words.” In the American Tree. Ed. Ron Silliman. Orono, ME: National Poetry Foundation, 1986.

---. “Some Notes toward a Poetics.” “Poetic Statement.” American Women Poets in the 21st Century. Edited by Claudia Rankine and Juliana Spahr. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2002.

---. “If Written Is Writing.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “Stages of Encounter with a Difficult Text.” Poetry & Pedagogy: The Challenge of the Contemporary. Ed. Joan Retallack and Juliana Spahr. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2006.

---. “Strangeness.” Artifice & Indeterminacy: An Anthology of New Poetics. Ed. Christopher Beach. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1998.

---. "Sun on the Avant-Garde." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 106-114.

Heller, Michael. “‘Translating’ Form: Pound, Rilke, Their Sculptors and the Contemporary Poem.” Conversant Essays: Contemporary Poets on Poetry. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1990. 538-548.

Hemingway, Ernest. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 45.

Henderson, Stephen. “The Forms of Things Unknown.” Poetry and Cultural Studies: A Reader. Edited by Maria Damon and Ira Livingston. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2009. 406-416.

Hendricks, Brent. "My Alternative Pop Song." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 115-116.

Henricksen, Matthew. Untitled Poetics Statement. The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 117. "Are people poems? Certainly, only we pass out of a greater pain that is not our own, while in the poem the pain adheres to the language rather than to our bodies" (117).

Herrera, Juan Filipe. Untitled essay on an Ars Poetica. What Will Suffice: Contemporary American Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Christopher Buckley and Christopher Merrill. Salt Lake City: Gibbs Smith, 1997.

Heyen, William. “What Do the Trees Say?” American Poets in 1976. Ed. William Heyen. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1976.

Higgins, Dick. “Seen, Heard, and Understood.” Claims for Poetry. Ed. Donald Hall. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000.

---. “Towards an Allusive Referential.” Claims for Poetry. Ed. Donald Hall. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000.

---. “Intermedia Chart.” Poems for the Millennium: The University of California Book of Modern & Postmodern Poetry. Volume Two: From Postwar to Millennium. Ed. Jerome Rothenberg and Pierre Joris. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998.

---. “Pattern Poems.” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

---. “A Book.” The Book, Spiritual Instrument. Edited by Jerome Rothenburg and David Guss. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 102-104.

High, John. “Scraps, Letters, Notes.” A Poetics of Criticism. Edited by Juliana Spahr, Mark Wallace, Kristin Prevallet, and Pam Rehm. Buffalo: Leave Books, 1994. 97-100. "Writing as a kind of sexuality rather than p*rnography of representation—though the world seduces and is seduced" (99).

Hill, Geoffrey. “Poetry as ‘Menace’ and ‘Atonement.’” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

Hillman, Brenda. “Twelve Writings toward a Poetics of Alchemy…” American Women Poets in the 21st Century. Edited by Claudia Rankine and Juliana Spahr. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2002.

---. “Seam Poetics.” Lyric Postmodernisms: An Anthology of Contemporary Innovative Poetries. Edited by Reginald Shepherd. Denver: Counterpath Press, 2008.

---. Untitled essay on an Ars Poetica. What Will Suffice: Contemporary American Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Christopher Buckley and Christopher Merrill. Salt Lake City: Gibbs Smith, 1997.

Hirsch, Edward. Untitled essay on an Ars Poetica. What Will Suffice: Contemporary American Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Christopher Buckley and Christopher Merrill. Salt Lake City: Gibbs Smith, 1997.

---. “My Grandfather’s Poems.” Conversant Essays: Contemporary Poets on Poetry. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1990. 367-369.

Hirshfield, Jane. Untitled essay on an Ars Poetica. What Will Suffice: Contemporary American Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Christopher Buckley and Christopher Merrill. Salt Lake City: Gibbs Smith, 1997.

Hodler, Ferdinand. “Parallelism.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Holden, Jonathan. “Postmodern Poetic Form: A Theory.” Poetics: Essays on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Paul Mariani and George Murphy. Ocean Bluff, MA: Tendril Magazine, 1984. 13-34.

Holderlin, Friedrich. “The Letters of Holderlin.” The Poet’s Vacation: Selections from Letters of Holderlin, Rimbaud & Hart Crane. Edited and translated by Wiliam Burford and Christopher Middleton. Austin: University of Texas Press, n.d. 9-31.

Holiday, Harmony. "That's the Way it's Gonna Be." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 117-121.

---. "My Work: My Archives, Your Archives, Our Archives." The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 123. "I'm moving forward toward my myth" (123).

Hollander, John. “Uncommonplaces.” Claims for Poetry. Ed. Donald Hall. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000.

---. Untitled Essay on a poem. Ecstatic Occasions, Expedient Forms: 85 Leading Contemporary Poets Select and Comment on Their Poems. Ed. David Lehman. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2001.

---. “The Metrical Frame.” The Structure of Verse: Modern Essays on Prosody. Ed. Harvey Gross. New York: Ecco Press, 1979.

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---. “P. Inman, Platin.” In the American Tree. Ed. Ron Silliman.

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---. “My Emily Dickinson: Part One.” A Guide to Poetics Journal: Writing in the Expanded Field 1982-1998. Ed. Lyn Hejinian & Barrett Watten. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2013. 98-110. "They worry unnecessarily that she couldn't celebrate and sing herself with Whitman, or declare confidently with Emerson that 'the Poet is the sayer, the namer,' that 'he is a sovereign and stands at the center'" (99).

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---. “Pig’s Bladder.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

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---. “The Hanged Man and the Dragonfly.” Poets on Painters: Essays on the Art of Painting by Twentieth-Century Poets. Edited by J.D. McClatchy. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988. 289-309.

---. “Words and Experience.” Strong Words: Modern Poets on Modern Poetry. Edited by W.N. Herbert and Matthew Hollis. Northumberland: Bloodaxe, 2000. 152-157.

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---. “The Real West Marginal Way.” American Poets in 1976. Ed. William Heyen. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1976.

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---. “Avis aux tourists (Warning to tourists).” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “We Must Create.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

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---. "Some Notes on the Tyrannical Prehension." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 134-137.

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--- and Nicole Tomlinson, and Julian Savage. “AND &.” Contemporary Poetics. Ed. Louis Armand. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2007. 175-184. “Is vagueness for life, or a gift of half-cognitive depression, life-deductible? At present I can work through my own question only in poetry” (175).

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---. “The Beginning.” American Poets in 1976. Ed. William Heyen. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1976.

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---. Untitled. The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

Isaac the Blind, 1350. “Lock Your Heart / That it May Not Brood.” Code of Signals: Recent Writings in Poetics. Ed. Michael Palmer. Berkeley: North Atlantic Books, 1983.

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---. “DADALETTRIE Meca-Esthetically Destructive 1 and 2.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

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---. “To Enlarge the Horizons of the Word.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. From “Desire for a Beginning Dread of One Single End.” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 99.

Jackson, Richard. Untitled essay on an Ars Poetica. What Will Suffice: Contemporary American Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Christopher Buckley and Christopher Merrill. Salt Lake City: Gibbs Smith, 1997.

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---. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 47.

Jameson, Fredric. "Baudelaire as Modernist and Postmodernist: The Dissolution of the Referent and the Artificial 'Sublime'." The Lyric Theory Reader: A Critical Anthology. Ed. Virginia Jackson and Yopie Prins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014. 350-361.

Janecek, Gerald. From “Kruchonykh and the Manuscript Book.” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 186-200.

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Jarrell, Randall. “The Woman at the Washington Zoo.” The Poet’s Work. Ed. Reginald Gibbons. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1979.

---. “The Obscurity of the Poet.” Twentieth-Century American Poetics: Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Dana Gioia, David Mason, and Meg Scho*rke. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2004.

---. “The End of the Line.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

---. “Against Abstract Expressionism.” Poets on Painters: Essays on the Art of Painting by Twentieth-Century Poets. Edited by J.D. McClatchy. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988. 185-193.

Jarvis, Simon. "Why Rhyme Pleases." The Lyric Theory Reader: A Critical Anthology. Ed. Virginia Jackson and Yopie Prins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014. 434-448.

---. “Hyper-Pindaric: The Greater Irregular Lyric from Cowley to Keston Sutherland.” Active Romanticism: The Radical Impulse in Nineteenth-Century and Contemporary Poetic Practice. Ed. Julie Carr and Jeffrey C. Robinson. Tuscaloosa, AL: University of Alabama Press, 2015. 127-144.

Jauss, Hans Robert. “La Douceur du foyer: Lyric poetry of the Year 1857 as a Model for the Communication of Social Norms.” Poetry and Cultural Studies: A Reader. Edited by Maria Damon and Ira Livingston. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2009. 226-234.

Jeffers, Robinson. “Poetry, Gongorism….” Twentieth-Century American Poetics: Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Dana Gioia, David Mason, and Meg Scho*rke. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2004.

---. “The Dregs of Romanticism – Forward to Selected Poetry of Robinson Jeffers.” Prose Keys to Modern Poetry. Edited by Karl Shapiro. Evanston: Row Peterson & Co., 1962. 209-213.

Jemc, Jac. "Notes on Trying to Say." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 141-146.

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---. "Apostrophe, Animation, and Abortion." The Lyric Theory Reader: A Critical Anthology. Ed. Virginia Jackson and Yopie Prins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014. 529-540.

Johnson, James Weldon. “Preface to The Book of American Negro Poetry.” Twentieth-Century American Poetics: Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Dana Gioia, David Mason, and Meg Scho*rke. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2004.

Johnson, Kasey. “Open Letter 11 March 2011.” The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. Ed. Claudia Rankine, Beth Loffreda, & Max King Cap. Albany, NY: Fence Books, 2015. 203-204.

Johnson, Kent. “Thirty-three Rules of Poetry for Poets Twenty-three and Under.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.

Johnson, Lacy M. “Trespasses.” The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. Ed. Claudia Rankine, Beth Loffreda, & Max King Cap. Albany, NY: Fence Books, 2015. 214-218.

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Johnson, Samuel. “Preface to Shakespeare.” Criticism: Major Statements. Ed. Charles Kaplan & William Anderson. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1991.

---. from “The Metaphysical Poets.” The McGraw Hill Book of Poetry. Edited by Robert DiYanni and Kraft Rompf. New York: McGraw Hill, 1993.

Johnson, W.R. "On the Absence of Ancient Literary Theory." The Lyric Theory Reader: A Critical Anthology. Ed. Virginia Jackson and Yopie Prins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014. 91-103.

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Jones, Hettie and Joanne Kyger, Janine Pommy Vega, and Anne Walman. “Women and the Beats.” Beats at Naropa. Ed. Anne Waldman and Laura Wright. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2009.

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---. “Timber: or, Discoveries.” Poets on Poetry. Ed. Charles Norman. New York: Free Press, 1962.

Jordan, A. Van. “Open Letter.” The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. Ed. Claudia Rankine, Beth Loffreda, & Max King Cap. Albany, NY: Fence Books, 2015. 149-151.

Jordan, June. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 49.

Joris, Pierre. “Council on Counterpoetics” (with 10 others). Poems for the Millennium: The University of California Book of Modern & Postmodern Poetry. Volume Two: From Postwar to Millennium. Ed. Jerome Rothenberg and Pierre Joris. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998.

---. “→→Nomad→→Century→→Ahead.” Civil Disobediences: Poetics and Politics in Action. Ed. Anne Waldman and Lisa Birman. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2004.

---. "15 Non-Theses Towards an Un-Manifesto of Poetry Un-Randomly Culled From Recent Notebooks." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 150-154.

---. "Arabic Poetics & the International Literary Scene." Cross Worlds: Transcultural Poetics: An Anthology. Ed. Anne Waldman & Laura Wright. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2014. 153-168.

Joron, Andrew. “Accident over N: Lines of Flight in the Philosophical Notebooks of Novalis.” Active Romanticism: The Radical Impulse in Nineteenth-Century and Contemporary Poetic Practice. Ed. Julie Carr and Jeffrey C. Robinson. Tuscaloosa, AL: University of Alabama Press, 2015. 234-248.

Judd, Bettina. “Writing about Race.” The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. Ed. Claudia Rankine, Beth Loffreda, & Max King Cap. Albany, NY: Fence Books, 2015. 265-266.

Justice, Donald. “Meters and Memory.” Twentieth-Century American Poetics: Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Dana Gioia, David Mason, and Meg Scho*rke. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2004.

---. Untitled essay on a poem. Fifty Contemporary Poets: The Creative Process. Ed. Alberta T. Turner. New York: David McKay Co., 1977.

Kafka, Franz. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 51.

Kalaidjian, Walter. “Genocide, Modernism, and American Verse: Reading Diana Der-Hovanessian.” Poetry and Cultural Studies: A Reader. Edited by Maria Damon and Ira Livingston. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2009. 390-405.

Kandel, Lenore. “Poetry Is Never Compromise.” The Poetics of The New American Poetry. Edited by Donald Allen and Warren Tallman. New York: Grove Press, 1973.

Kandinsky, Wassily. “Seeing.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “Sounds.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “Line and Fish.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “Concrete Art.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Kandinsky, Wassily and Franz Marc. “Preface to Der Blaue Reiter.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Kapil, Bhanu. "Elemental Notes:" The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 155-156.

---. "The Event of the Border." Cross Worlds: Transcultural Poetics: An Anthology. Ed. Anne Waldman & Laura Wright. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2014. 169-172.

---. Untitled Poetics Statement. The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 135. "I am interested in social death and the acoustics of violence" (135).

---. “Schizophrene: Texture Notes.” The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. Ed. Claudia Rankine, Beth Loffreda, & Max King Cap. Albany, NY: Fence Books, 2015. 242-243.

Kaprow, Allan. “Words: An Environment.” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 445-447.

Karasick, Adeena. “N[or]rth of Ar(c)ticulation.” A Poetics of Criticism. Edited by Juliana Spahr, Mark Wallace, Kristin Prevallet, and Pam Rehm. Buffalo: Leave Books, 1994. 139-145. "Within Canadian Literature, 'The North' has repeatedly emerged as a dominating image of National Identity, and thus historically shaped the way Canada has been represented. However, through a sexist, imperialist discourse of mastery, idealization, and a mythology of cohesion, it has been framed as redemptive, ineffable, inscribed in silence, absence and purity" (139).

Katz, Joy. “Goodbye, Goodbye, Goodbye: Notes on the Ends of Poems.” The Monkey & The Wrench: Essays Into Contemporary Poetics. Akron, OH: University of Akron Press, 2011.

Kaufman, Shirley. Untitled essay on a poem. Fifty Contemporary Poets: The Creative Process. Ed. Alberta T. Turner. New York: David McKay Co., 1977.

---. “Some Thoughts about Lines.” A Field Guide to Contemporary Poetry and Poetics. Revised Edition. Ed. Stuart Friebert, David Walker, and David Young. Oberlin, OH: Oberlin College Press, 1997.

---. “Here and There: The Use of Place in Contemporary Poetry.” A Field Guide to Contemporary Poetry and Poetics. Revised Edition. Ed. Stuart Friebert, David Walker, and David Young. Oberlin, OH: Oberlin College Press, 1997.

---. “Backache, Poemache, and Botz.” A Field Guide to Contemporary Poetry and Poetics. Revised Edition. Ed. Stuart Friebert, David Walker, and David Young. Oberlin, OH: Oberlin College Press, 1997.

Kavanagh, Patrick. “From Self Portrait.” Strong Words: Modern Poets on Modern Poetry. Edited by W.N. Herbert and Matthew Hollis. Northumberland: Bloodaxe, 2000. 122-126.

Keats, John. “Four Letters.” Criticism: Major Statements. Ed. Charles Kaplan & William Anderson. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1991.

---. “The Authenticity of Imagination.” The McGraw Hill Book of Poetry. Edited by Robert DiYanni and Kraft Rompf. New York: McGraw Hill, 1993.

---. “The Genius of Poetry, and his Own Art.” The Prelude to Poetry: The English Poets in Defence and Praise of Their Own Art. Ed. Ernest Rhys. London: J.M. Dent, 1927.

---. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 53.

Keelan, Claudia. “Present in Wilderness.” Lyric Postmodernisms: An Anthology of Contemporary Innovative Poetries. Edited by Reginald Shepherd. Denver: Counterpath Press, 2008.

---. Untitled essay on an Ars Poetica. What Will Suffice: Contemporary American Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Christopher Buckley and Christopher Merrill. Salt Lake City: Gibbs Smith, 1997.

Keene, John. Untitled Poetics Statement. The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 141. "The poems offer and are what remains: the black, queer residue" (141).

Kelly, Andrew. “Taste, Form.” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

Kelley, Robin D.G. “Kickin’ Reality, Kickin’ Ballistics: Gangsta Rap and Postindustrial Los Angeles.” Poetry and Cultural Studies: A Reader. Edited by Maria Damon and Ira Livingston. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2009. 199-212.

Kennedy, X.J. “Fenced-In Fields.” Claims for Poetry. Ed. Donald Hall. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000.

---. Untitled essay on a poem. Fifty Contemporary Poets: The Creative Process. Ed. Alberta T. Turner. New York: David McKay Co., 1977.

Kennelly, Brendan. “Voices.” Strong Words: Modern Poets on Modern Poetry. Edited by W.N. Herbert and Matthew Hollis. Northumberland: Bloodaxe, 2000. 213-214.

Kern, Bliem. “Sound Poetry.” Claims for Poetry. Ed. Donald Hall. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000.

Kerouac, Jack. “Untitled.” The New American Poetry 1945-1960. Ed. Donald Allen. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2000.

Khlebnikov, Velimir. “On Poetry.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

---. “On Contemporary Poetry.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

Khlebnikov, Victor and Alexey Kruchenykh. “The Letter as Such.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “The Word as Such.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Khlebnikov and others. “The Trumpet of the Martians.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Killian, Kevin. "'I Can't See You Anymore, Baby': Accessibility, the Avant-Garde, and My Flick Knife." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 157-160.

Kim, Myung Mi. “Convolutions...” American Poets in the 21st Century: The New Poetics. Edited by Claudia Rankine and Lisa Sewell. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2007.

King, Amy. "Gestural Poetics." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 161-162.

Kinnell, Galway. “Poetry, Personality, and Death.” Claims for Poetry. Ed. Donald Hall. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000.

Kinsella, John. “Almost a Dialogue with Lyn Hejinian: Quotations and Phantom Limbs...” Strong Words: Modern Poets on Modern Poetry. Edited by W.N. Herbert and Matthew Hollis. Northumberland: Bloodaxe, 2000. 203-207.

Kinzie, Mary. “The Rhapsodic Fallacy.” Twentieth-Century American Poetics: Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Dana Gioia, David Mason, and Meg Scho*rke. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2004.

Kirby, David. “A Wilderness of Monkeys.” The Monkey & The Wrench: Essays Into Contemporary Poetics. Akron, OH: University of Akron Press, 2011.

Klebnikov, Velimir. “The One, the Only Book.” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 201-202.

Klee, Paul. “Creative Credo.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “We Construct and Construct.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Klepfisz, Irena. “Forging a Woman’s Link in Di Goldene Keyt: Some Possibilities for Jewish American Poetry.” Conversant Essays: Contemporary Poets on Poetry. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1990. 370-376.

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Klonaris, Helen. “If I Tell These Stories: Notes on Racism and the White Imaginary.” The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. Ed. Claudia Rankine, Beth Loffreda, & Max King Cap. Albany, NY: Fence Books, 2015. 83-90.

Knowles, Alison. “On The Book of Bean.” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000.

Kokoschka, Oskar. “On the Nature of Visions.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Komunyakaa, Yusef. Untitled essay on an Ars Poetica. What Will Suffice: Contemporary American Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Christopher Buckley and Christopher Merrill. Salt Lake City: Gibbs Smith, 1997.

---. “The Autobiographical “I”: An Archive of Metaphor, Imagery, and Innuendo.” After Confession: Poetry as Autobiography. Saint Paul: Graywolf Press, 2001. 144-148.

Kooser, Ted. “Lying for the Sake of Making Poems.” After Confession: Poetry as Autobiography. Saint Paul: Graywolf Press, 2001. 158-161.

Kostelanetz, Richard. “Avant-Garde.” Claims for Poetry. Ed. Donald Hall. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000.

Kristeva, Julia. “The Ethics of Linguistics.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

Kumar, Amitava. “Poetry for People.” Poetry and Cultural Studies: A Reader. Edited by Maria Damon and Ira Livingston. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2009. 213-225.

Kumin, Maxine. Untitled essay on a poem. Fifty Contemporary Poets: The Creative Process. Ed. Alberta T. Turner. New York: David McKay Co., 1977.

---. Untitled essay on an Ars Poetica. What Will Suffice: Contemporary American Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Christopher Buckley and Christopher Merrill. Salt Lake City: Gibbs Smith, 1997.

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Kunin, Aaron. Untitled Poetics Statement. The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 149-150. "I expect to be humiliated in speech, but not in writing. This is probably why I became a writer" (150).

Kunitz, Stanley. “Action and Incantation.” Antaeus. Poetry & Poetics. Summer / Autumn, 1978. Vol. 30/31.

Lacan, Jacques. “Excerpts from Seminars and Papers.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

Lacoue-Labarthe, Phillippe. "Poetry as Experience: Two Poems by Paul Celan." The Lyric Theory Reader: A Critical Anthology. Ed. Virginia Jackson and Yopie Prins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014. 399-418.

Lakoff, George. “Continuous Reframing.” A Guide to Poetics Journal: Writing in the Expanded Field 1982-1998. Ed. Lyn Hejinian & Barrett Watten. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2013. 111-118. "Art is framed as art: the curtain rises, the musicians take their seats; the urinal is on the museum wall not in the men's room. If the art is representational, then we understand what is being represented by using our ordinary non-art frames together with whatever means of framing the genre provides" (112).

Lally, Michael. “My Work.” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

---. Untitled. The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

Landor, Walter Savage. “Poetry without Body.” The Prelude to Poetry: The English Poets in Defence and Praise of Their Own Art. Ed. Ernest Rhys. London: J.M. Dent, 1927.

Lansana, Quraysh Ali. “Open Door: A Meditation.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.

Lansing, Gerrit. “La p(l)age poetique.” Code of Signals: Recent Writings in Poetics. Ed. Michael Palmer. Berkeley: North Atlantic Books, 1983.

Lansing, Stephen J. “The Aesthetics of the Sounding of the Text.” The Book, Spiritual Instrument. Edited by Jerome Rothenburg and David Guss. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 21-44.

Larionov, Mikhail and Natalya Goncharova. “Rayonists and Futurists: A Manifesto.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Larkin, Philip. “The Pleasure Principle.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

---. “Writing Poems.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

---. “Statement.” Strong Words: Modern Poets on Modern Poetry. Edited by W.N. Herbert and Matthew Hollis. Northumberland: Bloodaxe, 2000. 150-151.

Lasky, Dorothea. Untitled Poetics Statement. The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 157. "My beliefs about what makes poetry a special form of writing stem from a deep appreciation of the sublime beauty of everday language, which can be, of course, the speech of both written and spoken text" (157).

Lauterbach, Ann. “As (It) Is: Toward a Poetics of the Whole Fragment.” American Women Poets in the 21st Century. Edited by Claudia Rankine and Juliana Spahr. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2002.

---. Untitled Essay on a poem. Ecstatic Occasions, Expedient Forms: 85 Leading Contemporary Poets Select and Comment on Their Poems. Ed. David Lehman. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2001.

---. Untitled essay on an Ars Poetica. What Will Suffice: Contemporary American Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Christopher Buckley and Christopher Merrill. Salt Lake City: Gibbs Smith, 1997.

---. “On Memory.” Conversant Essays: Contemporary Poets on Poetry. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1990. 519-524.

---. "In Praise of The Various." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 163-165.

Lawrence, D.H. “Preface to New Poems.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

---. “The Spirit of Place.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “Edgar Allen Poe.” Prose Keys to Modern Poetry. Edited by Karl Shapiro. Evanston: Row Peterson & Co., 1962. 226-239.

---. From “The Introduction to These Paintings.” Poets on Painters: Essays on the Art of Painting by Twentieth-Century Poets. Edited by J.D. McClatchy. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988. 45-79.

---. “Whitman.” Prose Keys to Modern Poetry. Edited by Karl Shapiro. Evanston: Row Peterson & Co., 1962. 239-250.

Lazarre, Jane. “On Politics and Art, the Writer in Society.” The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. Ed. Claudia Rankine, Beth Loffreda, & Max King Cap. Albany, NY: Fence Books, 2015. 248-251.

Lazer, Hank. “The Politics of Form and Poetry’s Other Subjects: Reading Contemporary American Poetry.” Artifice & Indeterminacy: An Anthology of New Poetics. Ed. Christopher Beach. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1998.

---. "Why I Write and What's at Stake." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 166-171.

---. "Of Course Poetry Is Difficult / Poetry Is Not Difficult." Reading the Difficulties: Dialogues with Contemporary American Innovative Poetry. Ed. Thomas Fink and Judith Halden-Sullivan. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2014. 28-40. "What would it mean to 'get' a poem?" (28).

Le Corbusier [Charles Édouard Jeanneret] and Amédée Ozenfant. “Purism.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Le Lionnais, François. “The Litpot: The First Manifesto.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Lea, Sydney. ““Making a Case; or, ‘Where Are You Coming From.’” After Confession: Poetry as Autobiography. Saint Paul: Graywolf Press, 2001. 38-50.

Leask, Nigel. “‘A Spark o’ Nature’s Fire’: Robert Burns and the Vernacular Muse.” Active Romanticism: The Radical Impulse in Nineteenth-Century and Contemporary Poetic Practice. Ed. Julie Carr and Jeffrey C. Robinson. Tuscaloosa, AL: University of Alabama Press, 2015. 108-126.

Lee, Sueyeun Juliette. "Actual, Real, & True." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 172-174.

Léger, Fernand. “The Aesthetic of the Machine (excerpt).” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Lehman, David. “Three Meditations on Wallace Stevens.” Conversant Essays: Contemporary Poets on Poetry. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1990. 525-537.

Leithauser, Brad. “The Confinement of Free Verse.” Conversant Essays: Contemporary Poets on Poetry. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1990. 162-174.

Leo, John. “/Capital/ /Writing/.” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

Leonard, Tom. “From the Introduction to Radical Renfrew.” Strong Words: Modern Poets on Modern Poetry. Edited by W.N. Herbert and Matthew Hollis. Northumberland: Bloodaxe, 2000. 195-197.

Lerer, Seth. "The Genre of the Grace and the Origins of the Middle English Lyric." The Lyric Theory Reader: A Critical Anthology. Ed. Virginia Jackson and Yopie Prins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014. 104-114.

Leslie, Juliana. "Passive Voice." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 175-177.

---. Untitled Poetics Statement. The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 165. "If I look sideways away from myself, if I disfigure myself, I may find something" (165).

Levertov, Denise. “Untitled.” The New American Poetry 1945-1960. Ed. Donald Allen. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2000.

---. “Some Notes on Organic Form.” Postmodern American Poetry: A Norton Anthology. Ed. Paul Hoover. New York: W. W. Norton, 1994.

---. “An Admonition.” Claims for Poetry. Ed. Donald Hall. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000.

---. “Origins of a Poem.” Claims for Poetry. Ed. Donald Hall. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000.

---. “On the Function of the Line.” Claims for Poetry. Ed. Donald Hall. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000.

---. Untitled essay on a poem. Fifty Contemporary Poets: The Creative Process. Ed. Alberta T. Turner. New York: David McKay Co., 1977.

---. “Work and Inspiration: Inviting the Muse.” A Field Guide to Contemporary Poetry and Poetics. Revised Edition. Ed. Stuart Friebert, David Walker, and David Young. Oberlin, OH: Oberlin College Press, 1997.

---. “I believe poets are instruments.” Strong Words: Modern Poets on Modern Poetry. Edited by W.N. Herbert and Matthew Hollis. Northumberland: Bloodaxe, 2000. 102.

---. “On Williams’ Triadic Line; or How to Dance on Variable Feet.” Conversant Essays: Contemporary Poets on Poetry. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1990. 141-148.

Levi-Strauss, David. “Approaching 80 Flowers.” Code of Signals: Recent Writings in Poetics. Ed. Michael Palmer. Berkeley: North Atlantic Books, 1983.

Levine, Mark. “Poetics Statement.” American Poets in the 21st Century: The New Poetics. Edited by Claudia Rankine and Lisa Sewell. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2007.

Levine, Philip. “Letters from a Young Poet.” Antaeus. Poetry & Poetics. Summer / Autumn, 1978. Vol. 30/31.

---. “The Poet in New York in Detroit.” 20th Century Poetry & Poetics. Fourth Edition. Ed. Gary Geddes. Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996.

---. Untitled essay on an Ars Poetica. What Will Suffice: Contemporary American Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Christopher Buckley and Christopher Merrill. Salt Lake City: Gibbs Smith, 1997.

Levine, Stacey. "Writing Properly?" The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 178.

Levis, Larry. Untitled essay on an Ars Poetica. What Will Suffice: Contemporary American Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Christopher Buckley and Christopher Merrill. Salt Lake City: Gibbs Smith, 1997.

---. “Some Notes on the Gazer Within.” A Field Guide to Contemporary Poetry and Poetics. Revised Edition. Ed. Stuart Friebert, David Walker, and David Young. Oberlin, OH: Oberlin College Press, 1997.

---. “Eden and My Generation.” A Field Guide to Contemporary Poetry and Poetics. Revised Edition. Ed. Stuart Friebert, David Walker, and David Young. Oberlin, OH: Oberlin College Press, 1997.

Levitsky, Rachel. Untitled Poetics Statement. The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 171. "I was happy when I landed the form also because it was an excuse for me to write some essay-fiction-polemic/political-tract-experimental prose in which I could narrate things I'd done and seen and thought about over time, activist time" (171).

Levy, Andrew. “An Indispensible Coefficient of Esthetic Order.” Telling It Slant: Avant-Garde Poetics of the 1990s. Ed. Mark Wallace & Steven Marks. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2001. 381-394. “I think I write because it’s the time and place that brings the most difficulty, sadness, pain, and pleasure, always sensual, sometimes erotic. Not so much a feeling of freedom, but a space in which temporarily there’s no question about its necessity for life. It’s that social ledge upon which the relation between one’s own tasks and those met by others meet” (382).

---. “The Existence of the Writer – The Unthought Known.” A Poetics of Criticism. Edited by Juliana Spahr, Mark Wallace, Kristin Prevallet, and Pam Rehm. Buffalo: Leave Books, 1994. 201-207.

Lewis, Wyndham. “Bless England.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “Curse with Expletive of Whirlwind…” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “Oh Blast France.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Lifton, John. “Council on Counterpoetics” (with 10 others). Poems for the Millennium: The University of California Book of Modern & Postmodern Poetry. Volume Two: From Postwar to Millennium. Ed. Jerome Rothenberg and Pierre Joris. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998.

Lim, Sandra. “Open Letter.” The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. Ed. Claudia Rankine, Beth Loffreda, & Max King Cap. Albany, NY: Fence Books, 2015. 254-255.

Lim, Shirley Geok-Lin. “The Scarlet Brewer….” Twentieth Cent. American Poetry. Ed. Gioia, et al.

Limón, Ada. “Mystery and Birds: Five Ways to Practice Poetry.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.

Lin, Tan. “ambient stylistics.” Telling It Slant: Avant-Garde Poetics of the 1990s. Ed. Mark Wallace & Steven Marks. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2001. 339-365. “There is something primitive about language and this is what most people forget, and in the midst of being alone in a big city it is what one craves most (talking) and here in the various brainwaves endlessly going one finds the blueprint of all language and talking” (340).

---. “Language Poetry, Language Technology, and the Fractal Dimension: Michael Palmer Prints Out a Kingdom.” A Poetics of Criticism. Edited by Juliana Spahr, Mark Wallace, Kristin Prevallet, and Pam Rehm. Buffalo: Leave Books, 1994. 237-248.

---. Untitled Poetics Statement. The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 175. "I think works of literature should be structured more like RSS feeds or Yelp restaurant reviews, i.e. I am more interested in literature as a highly transient event rather than a timeless, architectural structure, and most of my work has moved toward more diffuse forms of reading across a host of different platforms, and multiple genres, some of which are related to hardware and some to software" (175).

Liu, Timothy. “A Multitude of Tongues.” Lyric Postmodernisms: An Anthology of Contemporary Innovative Poetries. Edited by Reginald Shepherd. Denver: Counterpath Press, 2008.

---. “The Craft Can Be Taught but Not the Art.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.

---. "Why We Do That Thing We Do." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 179-182.

Llewellyn, Casey. “What We Could Do with Writing.” The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. Ed. Claudia Rankine, Beth Loffreda, & Max King Cap. Albany, NY: Fence Books, 2015. 43-48.

Loffreda, Beth. “Open Letter.” The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. Ed. Claudia Rankine, Beth Loffreda, & Max King Cap. Albany, NY: Fence Books, 2015. 208-211.

Logan, John. “On Poets and Poetry Today.” Claims for Poetry. Ed. Donald Hall. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000.

---. “On My Early Poems.” American Poets in 1976. Ed. William Heyen. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1976.

Logan, William. “Four or Five Motions toward a Poetics.” 20th Cent. American Poetry. Ed. Gioia, et al.

---. “The Absolute Unreasonableness of Geoffrey Hill.” Conversant Essays: Contemporary Poets on Poetry. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1990. 34-47.

Longinus. On the Sublime (complete). Criticism: Major Statements. Ed. Charles Kaplan & William Anderson. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1991.

Lopez, Robert. "The Good Thing About Today is that I Slept through Most of It, or the Illusion of Urgency." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 183-185.

Lorca, Federico García. “Play and Theory of the Duende….” The Poet’s Work. Ed. Reginald Gibbons. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1979.

Lorde, Audre. “Poems are Not Luxuries.” Claims for Poetry. Ed. Donald Hall. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000.

---. “Poetry Is Not a Luxury.” Poetry and Cultural Studies: A Reader. Edited by Maria Damon and Ira Livingston. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2009. 355-357.

Lovelace, Sean. "Turnips." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 186-188.

Lowell, Amy. “Preface to Some Imagist Poets.” Twentieth-Century American Poetics: Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Dana Gioia, David Mason, and Meg Scho*rke. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2004.

---. “Poetry as a Spoken Art.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

Lowell, Robert. “On ‘Skunk Hour.’” Strong Words: Modern Poets on Modern Poetry. Edited by W.N. Herbert and Matthew Hollis. Northumberland: Bloodaxe, 2000. 106-109.

Loy, Mina. “Modern Poetry.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

---. “Aphorisms on Futurism.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “Aphorisms on Modernism.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “Notes on Existence.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “The Artist and the Public.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “Auto-Facial-Construction.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “Feminist Manifesto.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Luoma, Bill. “Cowgirls Like the Salt Like…” Telling It Slant: Avant-Garde Poetics of the 1990s. Ed. Mark Wallace & Steven Marks. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2001. 281-299. “For a writer to say gender is a fiction may appear to deny political efficacy because gender is that major signifier that points to sexual discrimination, gay bashing rape. The writer must advocate the advance of things that free. How can writers, I mean writers in their writing, do this? Writers create fictions. Maybe fictions can help” (283).

Mac Low, Jackson. “Language-Centered.” The American Tree. Ed. Ron Silliman.

---. “Language and Politics.” The Politics of Poetic Form: Poetry and Public Policy. Ed. Charles Bernstein. New York: Roof Books, 1998.

---. “Statement.” The Poetics of The New American Poetry. Edited by Donald Allen and Warren Tallman. New York: Grove Press, 1973.

---. “Some Remarks to the Dancers.” The Poetics of The New American Poetry. Edited by Donald Allen and Warren Tallman. New York: Grove Press, 1973.

---. “The Poetics of Chance & the Politics of Simultaneous Spontaneity…” Talking Poetics from Naropa Institute: Annals of the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics. Volume 1. Ed. Anne Waldman and Marilyn Webb. Boulder: Shambhala, 1978.

---. “Museletter.” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

---. “Some Ways Philosophy Has Helped to Shape My Work.” A Guide to Poetics Journal: Writing in the Expanded Field 1982-1998. Ed. Lyn Hejinian & Barrett Watten. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2013. 119-125. "my competence as a student of philosophy has never been very great. But possibly this very incompetence has been fruitful. That is, philosophers may have influenced my work meaningfully through misreadings or through misapplications (or skewed applications) of concepts (or even dogmas) gained from more or less valid readings and from oral teaching" (119).

Macadams, Lewis. “Poetry and Politics.” Talking Poetics from Naropa Institute: Annals of the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics. Volume Two. Ed. Anne Waldman and Marilyn Webb. Boulder: Shambhala, 1978.

MacDiarmid, Hugh. “Poetry and Science.” The Poet’s Work. Ed. Reginald Gibbons. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1979.

---. From “A Theory of Scots Letters.” Strong Words: Modern Poets on Modern Poetry. Edited by W.N. Herbert and Matthew Hollis. Northumberland: Bloodaxe, 2000. 74-79.

Macdonald, Cynthia. Untitled essay on a poem. Fifty Contemporary Poets: The Creative Process. Ed. Alberta T. Turner. New York: David McKay Co., 1977.

Machado, Antonio. “Notes on Poetry.” The Poet’s Work. Ed. Reginald Gibbons. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1979.

---. “Problems of the Lyric.” The McGraw Hill Book of Poetry. Edited by Robert DiYanni and Kraft Rompf. New York: McGraw Hill, 1993.

Maciunas, George. “A Manifesto for Fluxus.” Poems for the Millennium: The University of California Book of Modern & Postmodern Poetry. Volume Two: From Postwar to Millennium. Ed. Jerome Rothenberg and Pierre Joris. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998.

Mackey, Nathaniel. “Sound and Sentiment….” Postmodern American Poetry: A Norton Anthology. Ed. Paul Hoover. New York: W. W. Norton, 1994.

---. “Artist’s Statement.” Lyric Postmodernisms: An Anthology of Contemporary Innovative Poetries. Edited by Reginald Shepherd. Denver: Counterpath Press, 2008.

---. “from A Broken Bottle Traces…” Code of Signals: Recent Writings in Poetics. Ed. Michael Palmer. Berkeley: North Atlantic Books, 1983.

---. “On Edge.” Artifice & Indeterminacy: An Anthology of New Poetics. Ed. Christopher Beach. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1998.

MacNeice, Louis. “A Statement.” Strong Words: Modern Poets on Modern Poetry. Edited by W.N. Herbert and Matthew Hollis. Northumberland: Bloodaxe, 2000. 72-73.

Magi, Jill. "Nothing is Wrong: 13 Thoughts on Poets and Poetry in the Year 2013." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 189-196.

---. “Racing Stein: What Is Seen and Unseen in Taking a Hero Out for a Reread.” The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. Ed. Claudia Rankine, Beth Loffreda, & Max King Cap. Albany, NY: Fence Books, 2015. 159-169.

Maizels, John. “The Phenomenon of Adolf Wolfli.” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 203-212.

Malevich, Kasimir. “Suprematism.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Malina, Judith and Hanon Reznikov. "Love and Politics." Cross Worlds: Transcultural Poetics: An Anthology. Ed. Anne Waldman & Laura Wright. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2014. 228-240.

Mallarmé, Stéphane. “Crisis in Poetry.” Toward the Open Field: Poets on the Art of Poetry 1800-1950. Ed. Melissa Kwasny. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2004.

---. “Action Restricted.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “A Throw of Dice Not Ever…” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Mandelstam, Osip. “The Word & Culture.” The Poet’s Work. Ed. Reginald Gibbons. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1979.

---. “On Classical Poetry.” The McGraw Hill Book of Poetry. Edited by Robert DiYanni and Kraft Rompf. New York: McGraw Hill, 1993.

---. “The Morning of Acmeism (parts I-IV).” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “The Book, Spiritual Instrument.” The Book, Spiritual Instrument. Edited by Jerome Rothenburg and David Guss. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 14-20.

Mangla, Ravi. "On the Merits of Moderation." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 197.

Marc, Franz. “Aphorisms.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “Der Blaue Reiter.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Marinetti, Filippo. “Technical Manifesto of Futurist Literature.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

---. “The Founding and Manifesto of Futurism.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “After the Marne, Joffre Visited the Front in an Automobile.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “Tactilism.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “Destruction of Syntax – Imagination Without Strings – Words-in-Freedom 1913.” Futurist Manifestos. Edited by Umbro Appolonio. Boston: Artworks, 2001. 95-106. “Others, more advanced, might compare the same trembling fox terrier to a little Morse Code Machine” (99).

--- and Emilio Settimelli, and Bruno Corra. “The Futurist Synthetic Theatre.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

--- and Emilio Settimelli, Bruno Corra, Arnaldo Ginna, Giacomo Balla, Remo Chiti. “The Futurist Cinema 1916.” Futurist Manifestos. Edited by Umbro Appolonio. Boston: Artworks, 2001. 207-219. “The cinema, being essentially visual, must above all fulfil the evolution of painting, detach itself from reality, from photography, from the graceful and solemn. It must become antigraceful, deforming, impressionistic, synthetic, dynamic, free-wording” (208).

--- and others. “The Futurist Manifesto of the Hat.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “Geometric and Mechanical Spendour and the Numerical Sensibility 1914.” Futurist Manifestos. Edited by Umbro Appolonio. Boston: Artworks, 2001. 154-160. “Everything in words-in-freedom that does not contribute towards the expression of the fugitive, mysterious Futurist sensibility with the newest geometrical-mechanical splendor must be resolutely banned” (157).

---. “The Variety of Theatre 1913.” Futurist Manifestos. Edited by Umbro Appolonio. Boston: Artworks, 2001. 126-131. “The Variety Theatre, born as we are from electricity, is lucky in having no tradition, no masters, no dogma, and it is fed by swift actuality” (126).

Mark, Sabrina Orah. “The Roster.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.

Marks, Steven. “Let s(a) = A Visual Inquiry.” Telling It Slant: Avant-Garde Poetics of the 1990s. Ed. Mark Wallace & Steven Marks. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2001.

Marlatt, Daphne. “musing with mothertongue.” 20th Century Poetry & Poetics. Fourth Edition. Ed. Gary Geddes. Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996.

Marquez, Gabriel Garcia. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 55.

Martin, Dawn Lundy. “Alien Eggs, or, the Poet as Mad Scientist.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.

---. Untitled Poetics Statement. The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 183-184. "When I speak out loud--when I am talking--I am not thinking about speaking as much as I'm doing it, language, falling over from tongue to air, dissolving. But when I write I work to carve out something in between" (183).

---. “Who’s Watching Anymore, Anyway?” The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. Ed. Claudia Rankine, Beth Loffreda, & Max King Cap. Albany, NY: Fence Books, 2015. 267-269.

Martinéz, J. Michael. "Aisthesis: THe Poetic As the (I)-Mmemorial." The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 191. "the memory of a thing is a belief in memory itself..." (191).

Mason, Chris. “Learning Reading as a Second Language.” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

Mather, Cotton. “On Poetry and Style.” American Poetry and Poetics: Poems and Critical Documents from the Puritans to Robert Frost. Edited by Daniel G. Hoffman. New York: Anchor Books, 1962.

Matta [Matta Echaurren]. “On Emotion.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Matthews, William. Untitled essay on a poem. Fifty Contemporary Poets: The Creative Process. Ed. Alberta T. Turner. New York: David McKay Co., 1977.

---. “Moving Around.” American Poets in 1976. Ed. William Heyen. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1976.

---. Untitled essay on an Ars Poetica. What Will Suffice: Contemporary American Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Christopher Buckley and Christopher Merrill. Salt Lake City: Gibbs Smith, 1997.

---. “A Note on Prose, Verse and the Line.” A Field Guide to Contemporary Poetry and Poetics. Revised Edition. Ed. Stuart Friebert, David Walker, and David Young. Oberlin, OH: Oberlin College Press, 1997.

---. “Ignorance.” Poetics: Essays on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Paul Mariani and George Murphy. Ocean Bluff, MA: Tendril Magazine, 1984. 217-226.

---. “Personal and Impersonal.” After Confession: Poetry as Autobiography. Saint Paul: Graywolf Press, 2001. 11-13.

Matuk, Farid. "Poem of the Near Mind." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 198-200.

---. Untitled Poetics Statement. The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 197. "Things rise and fall here; the train and cars weigh upon or sink into the earth even as the poem tries to move through personal and public darkness" (197).

---. “From Circ*mstances to Constellation: Richard Pryor, Resistance, and the Racial Imaginary’s Archive.” The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. Ed. Claudia Rankine, Beth Loffreda, & Max King Cap. Albany, NY: Fence Books, 2015. 140-148.

Mayakovsky, Vladimir. “How Are Verses Made?” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

---. “We, Too, Want Meat!” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “A Drop of Tar.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 57.

Mayer, Bernadette. “The Obfuscated Poem.” Postmodern American Poetry: A Norton Anthology. Ed. Paul Hoover. New York: W. W. Norton, 1994.

---. “Experiments.” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

---. From “The Desires of Mothers to Please Others in Letters.” A Poetics of Criticism. Edited by Juliana Spahr, Mark Wallace, Kristin Prevallet, and Pam Rehm. Buffalo: Leave Books, 1994. 305-313.

McCaffery, Steve. “from ‘Text-Sound, Energy and Performance.’” Poems for the Millennium: The University of California Book of Modern & Postmodern Poetry. Volume Two: From Postwar to Millennium. Ed. Jerome Rothenberg and Pierre Joris. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998.

---. “The Unreadable Text.” Code of Signals: Recent Writings in Poetics. Ed. Michael Palmer. Berkeley: North Atlantic Books, 1983.

---. “Sound Poetry.” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

---. “From the Notebooks.” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

---. “Blood. Rust. Capital. Bloodstream.” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

---. “Intraview.” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

---. “Parapoetics and the Architechtural Leap.” Contemporary Poetics. Ed. Louis Armand. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2007. 321-347. “Among other things, ‘para’ provokes a shift from temporal to spatial conceptualization and positioning…Accordingly I’ll be speaking more about the place of parapoetics than its ontology, on where it is and can be, than on what it is” (323).

---. “Discontinued Meditations.” Contemporary Poetics. Ed. Louis Armand. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2007. 372-375. “The Self, as it knows, is an ephemeral disguise, merely a habit of saying ‘I,’ and Malraux offers to the theory of the lyric the concept of an ‘‘I’ without a self,’ a poetic position of the personal without the laminating narratives of an ego” (374).

---. “Writing as a General Economy.” Artifice & Indeterminacy: An Anthology of New Poetics. Ed. Christopher Beach. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1998.

--- and bpNichol. From “The Book as Machine.” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 17-25.

McClatchy, J.D. “Anatomies of Melancholy.” Conversant Essays: Contemporary Poets on Poetry. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1990. 312-325.

McClure, Michael. “From a Journal.” The New American Poetry 1945-1960. Ed. Donald Allen. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2000.

---. “Phi Upsilon Kappa.” The Poetics of The New American Poetry. Edited by Donald Allen and Warren Tallman. New York: Grove Press, 1973.

---. “Revolt.” The Poetics of The New American Poetry. Edited by Donald Allen and Warren Tallman. New York: Grove Press, 1973.

---. “Cinnamon Turquoise Leather: (A Personal Universe Deck).” Talking Poetics from Naropa Institute: Annals of the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics. Volume 1. Ed. Anne Waldman and Marilyn Webb. Boulder: Shambhala, 1978.

---. “The First Reading of the Environmental Movement…” Beats at Naropa. Ed. Anne Waldman and Laura Wright. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2009.

McDowell, Robert. “The Assembling Vision of Rita Dove.” Conversant Essays: Contemporary Poets on Poetry. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1990. 294-302.

McGann, Jerome. “Private Poetry, Public Deception.” The Politics of Poetic Form: Poetry and Public Policy. Ed. Charles Bernstein. New York: Roof Books, 1998.

---. From “Composition as Explanation (of Modern and Postmodern Poetries).” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 228-245.

---. “Dialogue on Dialogue.” A Poetics of Criticism. Edited by Juliana Spahr, Mark Wallace, Kristin Prevallet, and Pam Rehm. Buffalo: Leave Books, 1994. 59-77. "Thinking only gets carried out in language, in texts. We sometimes imagine that we can think outside of language--for instance, in our heads, where we don't articulate language's customary (oral or scripted) forms. But the truth is that all thought is linguistically determined. You whine about being a textual construct. But you're able to think for precisely that reason. And so am I, and so are we all. We're all textual constructs" (74).

--- and Lisa Samuels. “Deformance and Interpretation.” Poetry & Pedagogy: The Challenge of the Contemporary. Ed. Joan Retallack and Juliana Spahr. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2006.

McCrae, Shane. Untitled Poetics Statement. The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 203. "I try to know as little as possible when I'm writing poems" (203).

McGrath, Thomas. “Language, Power, and Dream.” Claims for Poetry. Ed. Donald Hall. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000.

McKay, Don. “Some Remarks on Poetry and Poetic Attention.” 20th Century Poetry & Poetics. Fourth Edition. Ed. Gary Geddes. Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996.

McKean, James. “Notes on Improvisation, William Carlos Williams, and Jazz.” Conversant Essays: Contemporary Poets on Poetry. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1990. 348-360.

McMorris, Mark. “Artist’s Statement.” The Iowa Anthology of New American Poetries. Ed. by Reginald Shepherd. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2004.

---. “Performance as Critical Practice…” Poetry & Pedagogy: The Challenge of the Contemporary. Ed. Joan Retallack and Juliana Spahr. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2006.

---. "Where This Thing Is Going." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 201-205.

McPherson, Sandra. Untitled essay on a poem. Fifty Contemporary Poets: The Creative Process. Ed. Alberta T. Turner. New York: David McKay Co., 1977.

---. “The Two-Tone Line, Blues Ideology, and the Scrap Quilt.” A Field Guide to Contemporary Poetry and Poetics. Revised Edition. Ed. Stuart Friebert, David Walker, and David Young. Oberlin, OH: Oberlin College Press, 1997.

---. “The Working Line.” A Field Guide to Contemporary Poetry and Poetics. Revised Edition. Ed. Stuart Friebert, David Walker, and David Young. Oberlin, OH: Oberlin College Press, 1997.

---. “Secrets: Beginning to Write Them Out.” A Field Guide to Contemporary Poetry and Poetics. Revised Edition. Ed. Stuart Friebert, David Walker, and David Young. Oberlin, OH: Oberlin College Press, 1997.

---. Untitled essay on an Ars Poetica. What Will Suffice: Contemporary American Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Christopher Buckley and Christopher Merrill. Salt Lake City: Gibbs Smith, 1997.

McSweeney, Joyelle. "The Golden Age of Obliteration, or Staphylocus Aureus, or, How the Artist Must Be Accessible to Art." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 206-211.

--- and Johannes Göransson. “The Anxious Classroom…” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.

Mellis, Miranda. "Sub-Traction." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 212-215.

Meltzer, David. “Books within Books: Some Notes on the Kabbalah & the Sefer Yetsirah.” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 339-340.

---. “From the Rabbi’s Dream Book.” The Book, Spiritual Instrument. Edited by Jerome Rothenburg and David Guss. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 105-107.

Membreno, Soraya. “Open Letter.” The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. Ed. Claudia Rankine, Beth Loffreda, & Max King Cap. Albany, NY: Fence Books, 2015. 212-213.

Meredith, William. “The Luck of It.” American Poets in 1976. Ed. William Heyen. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1976.

Merrill, James. “Notes on Corot.” Poets on Painters: Essays on the Art of Painting by Twentieth-Century Poets. Edited by J.D. McClatchy. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988. 311-321.

Merwin, W.S. “On Open Form.” Twentieth-Century American Poetics: Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Dana Gioia, David Mason, and Meg Scho*rke. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2004.

---. Untitled Essay on a poem. Ecstatic Occasions, Expedient Forms: 85 Leading Contemporary Poets Select and Comment on Their Poems. Ed. David Lehman. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2001.

---. Untitled essay on an Ars Poetica. What Will Suffice: Contemporary American Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Christopher Buckley and Christopher Merrill. Salt Lake City: Gibbs Smith, 1997.

Messerli, Douglas. “Introduction.” ‘Language’ Poetries: An Anthology. Ed. Messerli. New York : New Directions, 1987.

Mignolo, Walter D. From “Signs and Their Transmission: The Question of the Book in the New World.” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 351-371.

Milks, Megan. "Avant Slash Pop." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 217-220.

Millet, Lydia. "Self Again." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 221-223.

Miller, J. Hillis. “The Poetics of Cyberspace: Two Ways to Get a Life.” Contemporary Poetics. Ed. Louis Armand. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2007. 256-278. “Everyone knows we are in the midst of an epochal transition from print culture to digital culture. Each of these cultures has its intrinsic poetics. I began by saying that poetics studies the way to do certain things, produce certain effects, with conglomerations of words or other signs, for example, to get the American people to accept the invasion of Iraq. This essay sets the way we used to get a life, that is, have our lives shaped for us, within print culture, against the way those who live primarily in cyberspace get a life today” (257).

Miller, Jr., James E. “America’s Epic.” Prose Keys to Modern Poetry. Edited by Karl Shapiro. Evanston: Row Peterson & Co., 1962. 182-186.

---. From “Song of Myself as Inverted Mystical Experience.” Prose Keys to Modern Poetry. Edited by Karl Shapiro. Evanston: Row Peterson & Co., 1962. 180-182.

Miller, Vassar. “What Is a Poet?” Poets on Poetry. Ed. Howard Nemerov. New York: Basic Books, 1966.

---. Untitled essay on a poem. Fifty Contemporary Poets: The Creative Process. Ed. Alberta T. Turner. New York: David McKay Co., 1977.

Milne, Drew. "In Memory of the Pterodactyl: The Limits of Lyric Humanism." The Lyric Theory Reader: A Critical Anthology. Ed. Virginia Jackson and Yopie Prins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014. 361-367.

Milosz, Czeslaw. “On Hope.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

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Miner, Earl. "Why Lyric?" The Lyric Theory Reader: A Critical Anthology. Ed. Virginia Jackson and Yopie Prins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014. 577-589.

Minh-Ha, Trihn T. “Poetry and Anthropology.” Poetry and Cultural Studies: A Reader. Edited by Maria Damon and Ira Livingston. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2009. 347-354.

Minor, Kyle. "Once Upon a Time (or, The Trouble with Avant-Garde Ought-Nots)." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 223-226.

Mistral, Gabriela. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 59.

Mobilio, Albert. “A Note on Hanging and the Uselessness of Verse.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.

Mohammad, K. Silem. “Creeping It Real: Brian Kim Stefans’ ‘Invisible Congress’ and the Notion of Community.” The Consequence of Innovation: 21st Century Poetics. Edited by Craig Dworkin. New York: Roof Books, 2008. 185-192.

Moholy-Nagy, László. “Dynamics of a Metropolis: A Film Sketch.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “Remarks for Those Who Refuse to Understand the Film Immediately.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Mondrian, Piet. “Neoplasticism in Painting.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “Natural Reality and Abstract Reality.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “The Plastic Means.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Monson, Ander. "Another Project for the Heart." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 227-228.

Montale, Eugenio. “Intentions (Imaginary Interview).” The Poet’s Work. Ed. Reginald Gibbons. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1979.

---. “The Poet.” Antaeus. Poetry & Poetics. Summer / Autumn, 1978. Vol. 30/31.

Moore, Caitie. “Race and Erasure.” The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. Ed. Claudia Rankine, Beth Loffreda, & Max King Cap. Albany, NY: Fence Books, 2015. 257-259.

Moore, Marianne. “Idiosyncrasy and Technique.” The Poet’s Work. Ed. Reginald Gibbons. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1979.

---. “Some Answers to Questions Posed by Howard Nemerov.” Poets on Poetry. Ed. Howard Nemerov. New York: Basic Books, 1966.

---. “Feeling and Precision.” Toward the Open Field: Poets on the Art of Poetry 1800-1950. Ed. Melissa Kwasny. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2004.

---. “I tend to write in a patterned arrangement.” Strong Words: Modern Poets on Modern Poetry. Edited by W.N. Herbert and Matthew Hollis. Northumberland: Bloodaxe, 2000. 103.

---. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 63.

---. “Robert Andrew Parker.” Poets on Painters: Essays on the Art of Painting by Twentieth-Century Poets. Edited by J.D. McClatchy. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988. 39-43.

Moréas, Jean. “The Symbolist Manifesto.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Morgan, Edwin. “Roof of Fireflies.” Strong Words: Modern Poets on Modern Poetry. Edited by W.N. Herbert and Matthew Hollis. Northumberland: Bloodaxe, 2000. 190-194.

Morise, Max. “Enchanted Eyes.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Morris, Tracie. “Sound Making Notes.” American Poets in the 21st Century: The New Poetics. Edited by Claudia Rankine and Lisa Sewell. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2007.

M---. “E-Racing Lingo.” The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. Ed. Claudia Rankine, Beth Loffreda, & Max King Cap. Albany, NY: Fence Books, 2015. 244.

Morrison, Toni. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 65.

Moschovakis, Anna. Untitled Poetics Statement. The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 209. "So long as I have questions to which there are no answers, I will go on writing" (209).

Moss, Thylias. Untitled Essay on a poem. Ecstatic Occasions, Expedient Forms: 85 Leading Contemporary Poets Select and Comment on Their Poems. Ed. David Lehman. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2001.

Moss, Thylias. “My Better Half.” After Confession: Poetry as Autobiography. Saint Paul: Graywolf Press, 2001. 127-128.

Moten, Fred. “It’s Not That I Want to Say.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.

---. "Poetics (Of Blackness)." The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 217. "There's a rough, unsutured transaction that moves against repair to make a scar. Poetry is a scar. It's hard to look at something when you can't look away" (217).

Mottram, Eric. “Official Poetry & Conformist Entertainment.” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

Moure, Erín. “Poetics Statement: A practice of possibility, a life in languages.” Eleven More American Women Poets in the 21st Century: Poetics Across North America. Ed. Claudia Rankine & Lisa Sewell. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2012. 169-171. "When you read this, I will be somewhere else, for that is what a practice in language is, an elsewhere, a placing that involves a yet-to-come" (171).

Mowitt, John. “A Musician Is Being Beaten.” Poetry and Cultural Studies: A Reader. Edited by Maria Damon and Ira Livingston. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2009. 340-346.

Moxley, Jennifer. “Poundian Poetic Ambition on the Semester System.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.

---. “A Deeper, Older O: The Oral (Sex) Tradition (in Poetry).” Active Romanticism: The Radical Impulse in Nineteenth-Century and Contemporary Poetic Practice. Ed. Julie Carr and Jeffrey C. Robinson. Tuscaloosa, AL: University of Alabama Press, 2015. 70-90.

Mueller, Lisel. “Two Strains.” Poetics: Essays on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Paul Mariani and George Murphy. Ocean Bluff, MA: Tendril Magazine, 1984. 245-253 [cuts off].

Mufti, Aamir R. "Towwards a Lyric History of India." The Lyric Theory Reader: A Critical Anthology. Ed. Virginia Jackson and Yopie Prins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014. 603-618.

Muldoon, Paul. “Go Figure.” Strong Words: Modern Poets on Modern Poetry. Edited by W.N. Herbert and Matthew Hollis. Northumberland: Bloodaxe, 2000. 172.

Mullen, Harryette. “Imagining the Unimagined Reader.” American Women Poets in the 21st Century. Edited by Claudia Rankine and Juliana Spahr. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2002.

---. “Miscegenated Texts and Media Cyborgs: Technologies of Body and Soul.” A Guide to Poetics Journal: Writing in the Expanded Field 1982-1998. Ed. Lyn Hejinian & Barrett Watten. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2013. 335-344. "The interiority of the Afro-American subject emerged as a discursive formation in a apolitical context that demanded its textualization in order to make 'visible' the lives, emotions, and intimate experience of a poplulation that earlier had been visible only as a mass of bodies represented as possessing little or no interiority" (335).

---. “Kinky Quatrains.” Ecstatic Occasions, Expedient Forms: 85 Leading Contemporary Poets Select and Comment on Their Poems. Ed. David Lehman. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2001.

---. “Poetry and Identity.” Telling It Slant: Avant-Garde Poetics of the 1990s. Ed. Mark Wallace & Steven Marks. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2001. 27-31. “In each generation the erasure of the anomalous black writer abets the construction of a continuous, internally consistent tradition, and it deprives the idiosyncratic minority artist of a history, compelling her to struggle even harder to construct a cultural context out of her own radical individuality. She is unanticipated and often unacknowledged because of the imposed obscurity of her aesthetic antecedents” (28).

---. “Between Jihad and McWorld: A Place for Poetry.” Poetry & Pedagogy: The Challenge of the Contemporary. Ed. Joan Retallack and Juliana Spahr. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2006.

Mullen, Laura. “Artist’s Statement.” The Iowa Anthology of New American Poetries. Ed. Reginald Shepherd. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2004.

---. “Torch Song (Prose Is a Prose Is a Prose).” Civil Disobediences: Poetics and Politics in Action. Ed. Anne Waldman and Lisa Birman. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2004.

---. “Nothing That Is Not There and the Nothing That Is: Some Notes on Teaching Poetry.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.

---. "Accidental Cliques? (Or, Uhm, Which Status Quo I was Supposed to Defy, Again?)." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 229-233.

---. “Poetics Statement.” Eleven More American Women Poets in the 21st Century: Poetics Across North America. Ed. Claudia Rankine & Lisa Sewell. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2012. 200-203. "Self and other are entangled, as are sound and silence" (200).

Munch, Edvard. “The St. Cloud Manifesto…” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “The Violet Diary (excerpt).” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “Art and Nature.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Munn, Henry. “Writing in the Imagination of an Oral Poet.” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 251-256.

Munn, Nancy. “Guruwari Designs.” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 279-285.

Murray, Les. “The Instrument.” Strong Words: Modern Poets on Modern Poetry. Edited by W.N. Herbert and Matthew Hollis. Northumberland: Bloodaxe, 2000. 201-202.

Muske, Carol. Untitled essay on an Ars Poetica. What Will Suffice: Contemporary American Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Christopher Buckley and Christopher Merrill. Salt Lake City: Gibbs Smith, 1997.

---. “Women and Poetry: Some Notes.” After Confession: Poetry as Autobiography. Saint Paul: Graywolf Press, 2001. 281-304.

Muslim, Kristine Ong. "On Writing, Accessibility, and the Avant-Garde." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 234-236.

Myers III, Isaac. “Open Letter.” The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. Ed. Claudia Rankine, Beth Loffreda, & Max King Cap. Albany, NY: Fence Books, 2015. 91-94.

Myles, Eileen. "Painted Clear, Painted Black." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 236-243.

---. “Poetics Statement.” Eleven More American Women Poets in the 21st Century: Poetics Across North America. Ed. Claudia Rankine & Lisa Sewell. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2012. 241-242. "The thrill for me is always the looming possibility of disconnection" (231).

---. "Choralizing Cultures." Cross Worlds: Transcultural Poetics: An Anthology. Ed. Anne Waldman & Laura Wright. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2014. 136-143.

Nabokov, Vladimir. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 67.

Nakayasu, Sawako "Poemaazu (Poemers) and Toranranranzureeshonzu (Translations)." Cross Worlds: Transcultural Poetics: An Anthology. Ed. Anne Waldman & Laura Wright. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2014. 271-275.

---. "From 'Infrequently Asked Questions'." The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 223-224. "I'll say it in my 'own' words: poetry is the source of all art" (223).

Nash, Susan Smith. “Construct Gloved & Anthropos Texted.” A Poetics of Criticism. Edited by Juliana Spahr, Mark Wallace, Kristin Prevallet, and Pam Rehm. Buffalo: Leave Books, 1994. 33-36. "Turn to Eros witha broken shot of names, experience" (33).

Nealon, Christopher. "The Matter of Capital, or Catastrophe and Textuality." The Lyric Theory Reader: A Critical Anthology. Ed. Virginia Jackson and Yopie Prins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014. 487-499.

---. Untitled Poetics Statement. The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 231-232. "I enjoy each poem's participation in the category 'poetry' as a buoy and a stay" (231).

Nemerov, Howard. “Attentiveness and Obedience.” Poets on Poetry. Ed. Howard Nemerov. New York: Basic Books, 1966.

---. “Image and Metaphor.” Poetics: Essays on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Paul Mariani and George Murphy. Ocean Bluff, MA: Tendril Magazine, 1984. 141-157.

---. “On Poetry and Painting, with a Thought on Music.” Poets on Painters: Essays on the Art of Painting by Twentieth-Century Poets. Edited by J.D. McClatchy. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988. 177-184.

Neruda, Pablo. “The Word.” The McGraw Hill Book of Poetry. Edited by Robert DiYanni and Kraft Rompf. New York: McGraw Hill, 1993.

---. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 69.

Newman, Barnett. “The Sublime Is Now.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Nezahualcoyotl. “The Painted Book.” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 249-250.

Ngai, Sianne. “Raw Matter: A Poetics of Disgust.” Telling It Slant: Avant-Garde Poetics of the 1990s. Ed. Mark Wallace & Steven Marks. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2001. 161-190. “In the social and material world we inhabit today it is arguable that potential objects of disgust (corporate ideology, bigotry, brute assertions of power and military force, all forms of institutionalized inequality) continue to balance if not outweight those of desire. A poetics of disgust would begin with this basic positions: that there are at least as many things to turn away from as things to be drawn to and that this repulsion is worth thinking about seriously” (163).

---. From “Stuplimity: Shock and Boredom in Twentieth-Century Aesthetics.” The Consequence of Innovation: 21st Century Poetics. Edited by Craig Dworkin. New York: Roof Books, 2008. 117-135.

Nguyen, Hoa. Untitled Poetics Statement. The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 239. "I think of language as always being that--a reaching after--and often I think I write poems toward a lost language and a lost referent. That I might be trying, through poetry, to create and excavate some shape of a ghostly imprint" (239).

bpNichol. “Some thots on THE MARTYROLOGY BOOK VI.” 20th Century Poetry & Poetics. Fourth Edition. Ed. Gary Geddes. Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996.

---. “After Reading the Chronology.” 20th Century Poetry & Poetics. Fourth Edition. Ed. Gary Geddes. Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996.

---. “Narrative in Language: The Long Poem.” 20th Century Poetry & Poetics. Fourth Edition. Ed. Gary Geddes. Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996.

Nichols, Grace. “The poetry I feel closest to.” Strong Words: Modern Poets on Modern Poetry. Edited by W.N. Herbert and Matthew Hollis. Northumberland: Bloodaxe, 2000. 211-212.

Niikuni, Seiichi and Pierre Garnier. “Position 3 of Spatialism…” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Nirenberg, Ricardo L. “Metaphor: The Color of Being.” Contemporary Poetics. Ed. Louis Armand. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2007. 153-174. “In the end, however, I will not advance a new definition but even suggest that a true definition of metaphor is not possible, or that, at least, it would be the unlikely equivalent of making poetry entirely translatable into scientific discourse” (153).

Noël, Bernard. “The Outrage Against Words.” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

Nolan, Kevin. “Getting Past Odradek.” Contemporary Poetics. Ed. Louis Armand. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2007. 41-56. “In this way, ‘Odradek’ becomes heterological; his name is not self-descriptive (he is the cause of dissuasion in others), and so right from the start all literal recognition is compromised by the uncertainty of interpretation” (43).

Notley, Alice. “The Poetics of Disobedience.” Civil Disobediences: Poetics and Politics in Action. Ed. Anne Waldman and Lisa Birman. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2004.

Nourbese-Philip, M. “The Habit Of: Poetry, Rats, and Cats.” A Poetics of Criticism. Edited by Juliana Spahr, Mark Wallace, Kristin Prevallet, and Pam Rehm. Buffalo: Leave Books, 1994. 209-213.

Nowak, Mark. “Notes toward an Anti-capitalist Poetics II.” American Poets in the 21st Century: The New Poetics. Edited by Claudia Rankine and Lisa Sewell. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2007.

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Nye, Naomi Shihab. Untitled essay on an Ars Poetica. What Will Suffice: Contemporary American Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Christopher Buckley and Christopher Merrill. Salt Lake City: Gibbs Smith, 1997.

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---. “Larry Rivers: A Memoir.” The Poetics of The New American Poetry. Edited by Donald Allen and Warren Tallman. New York: Grove Press, 1973.

---. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 71.

---. “Jackson Pollock.” Poets on Painters: Essays on the Art of Painting by Twentieth-Century Poets. Edited by J.D. McClatchy. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988. 195-216.

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Oliver, Akilah & students. “Statement on the Events of September 11, 2001.” Civil Disobediences: Poetics and Politics in Action. Ed. Anne Waldman and Lisa Birman. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2004.

--- and Joanne Kyger, Anne Waldman, & Eleni Sikelianos. "Cultural Activism: Writing Under the New World Order." Cross Worlds: Transcultural Poetics: An Anthology. Ed. Anne Waldman & Laura Wright. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2014. 173-184.

Oliver, Douglas. “Death, Shivers, and the Tick of Poetic Stress.” Civil Disobediences: Poetics and Politics in Action. Ed. Anne Waldman and Lisa Birman. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2004.

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---. “Gumshoe Poetry.” Poetry & Pedagogy: The Challenge of the Contemporary. Ed. Joan Retallack and Juliana Spahr. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2006.

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---. “The Flower of Capital.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

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Paz, Octavio. “from The Other Voice.” The McGraw Hill Book of Poetry. Edited by Robert DiYanni and Kraft Rompf. New York: McGraw Hill, 1993.

Peaco*ck, Molly. “What the Mockingbird Said.” Conversant Essays: Contemporary Poets on Poetry. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1990. 343-347.

Pearson, Ted. “A Form of Assumptions.” A Guide to Poetics Journal: Writing in the Expanded Field 1982-1998. Ed. Lyn Hejinian & Barrett Watten. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2013. 345-352. "Robert Creeley's poems, among their other insistences, are thematically saturated by a discourse on masculinity--a discourse erived from a culturally determined nexus of identity politics and lyric self-fashioning" (345).

Pelton, Ted. "Oscar vs. George." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 251-253.

Perelman, Bob. “For Change.” In the American Tree. Ed. Ron Silliman. Orono, ME: National Poetry Foundation, 1986.

---. “Words Detached from the Old Song and Dance.” Code of Signals: Recent Writings in Poetics. Ed. Michael Palmer. Berkeley: North Atlantic Books, 1983.

---. “Parataxis and Narrative: The New Sentence in Theory and Practice.” Artifice & Indeterminacy: An Anthology of New Poetics. Ed. Christopher Beach. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1998.

---. “Copying Whitman.” Active Romanticism: The Radical Impulse in Nineteenth-Century and Contemporary Poetic Practice. Ed. Julie Carr and Jeffrey C. Robinson. Tuscaloosa, AL: University of Alabama Press, 2015. 99-107.

---. “Good and Bad / Good and Evil: Pound, Céline, and Fascism” A Guide to Poetics Journal: Writing in the Expanded Field 1982-1998. Ed. Lyn Hejinian & Barrett Watten. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2013. 240-256. "We use the terms good and bad when discussing writing; we reserve good and evil for politics. To call writing evil seems exaggerated. A good writer can have bad politics, we say, treating politics aesthetically, which is much the easiest way...But politics, aesthetics, and psychology are so intertwined in their work as to provide a chance to explode the fiction of a purely aesthetic or formal consideration of writing" (240).

---. “Doctor Williams’s Position, Updated.” Contemporary Poetics. Ed. Louis Armand. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2007. 67-95. “For Williams, news is equally valuable, but its reception is more specific. The body is the locus of poetry’s claimed effects: an embodied reader either gets the news and can die in bed at peace or does not receive the blessing and dies miserably. Williams’s claim, unlike Pound’s, recognizes failure as one of the structuring possibilities of valid poetry” (68).

Perez, Craig Santos. “Whitewashing American Hybrid Aesthetics.” The Monkey & The Wrench: Essays Into Contemporary Poetics. Akron, OH: University of Akron Press, 2011.

---. "from Unincorporated Poetic Territories." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 254-257.

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---. “After Language Poetry: Innovation and Its Theoretical Discontents.” Contemporary Poetics. Ed. Louis Armand. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2007. 15-38. “At times in recent years, one wonders how long the drive to innovate can continue, especially when, as in the case of Sloan’s Moving Borders, fifty contemporary American women poets are placed under the “innovative” umbrella. Given these numbers, one wonders, who isn’t innovative? And how much longer can poets keep innovating without finding themselves inadvertently Making It Old?” (16).

---. “Screening the Page / Paging the Screen: Digital Poetics and the Differential Text.” Contemporary Poetics. Ed. Louis Armand. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2007. 376-392. “But what about digital poetry itself – the work now written expressly for the screen? The most interesting exemplars of digital poetics to date have tended to be what I have called elsewhere differential texts – that is to say, texts that exist in different material forms, with no single version being the definitive one” (379).

---. “The Changing Face of Common Intercourse: Talk Poetry, Talk Show, and the Scene of Writing.” Artifice & Indeterminacy: An Anthology of New Poetics. Ed. Christopher Beach. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1998.

---. “The Futurist Moment.” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 160-177.

---. “The Pleasures of Deja Dit: Citation, Intertext, and Ekphrasis in Recent Experimental Poetry.” The Consequence of Innovation: 21st Century Poetics. Edited by Craig Dworkin. New York: Roof Books, 2008. 255-277.

---. "Can(n)on to the Right of Us, Can(n)on to the Left of Us: A Plea for Difference." The Lyric Theory Reader: A Critical Anthology. Ed. Virginia Jackson and Yopie Prins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014. 460-476.

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---. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 75.

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Phillips, Tom. “The Postcard Vision.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “Notes on A Humument.” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 423-430.

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---. “DADA Manifesto.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “Is an Imbecile, an Idiot, a Pickpocket!!!” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

--- and others. “Dimensionist Manifesto.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

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Pierce, Michelle Naka. "I Am Both. I am Neither." Cross Worlds: Transcultural Poetics: An Anthology. Ed. Anne Waldman & Laura Wright. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2014. 268-270.

Pierre-Louis [Maurice Denis]. “Definition of Neo-Traditionalism.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Ping, Wang and Christian Ide Hintze, Elsa Cross, Ilya Kutik, and Lyn Hejinian. "Border Zones: Other Paradigms of Language." Cross Worlds: Transcultural Poetics: An Anthology. Ed. Anne Waldman & Laura Wright. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2014. 58-65.

Pinsky, Robert. “Responsibilities of the Poet.” Twentieth-Century American Poetics: Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Dana Gioia, David Mason, and Meg Scho*rke. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2004.

---. “Poetry and the World.” Claims for Poetry. Ed. Donald Hall. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000.

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---. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 79.

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---. “Axiomata.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

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---. “The Flesh Failures.” American Poets in the 21st Century: The New Poetics. Edited by Claudia Rankine and Lisa Sewell. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2007.

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---. “The Futurist ‘Atmosphere-structure’ – Basis for an Architecture 1914-15.” Futurist Manifestos. Edited by Umbro Appolonio. Boston: Artworks, 2001. 181-183. “Futurist architecture must have an atmospheric genesis since it mirrors the intense life of motion, light and air which nourishes Futurist man” (182).

---. “The Futurist Stage (Manifesto) 1915.” Futurist Manifestos. Edited by Umbro Appolonio. Boston: Artworks, 2001. 200-202. “The stage will no longer have a coloured back-drop, but a colourless electromechanical architectural structure, enlivened by chromatic emanations from a source of light, produced by electric reflectors with coloured filters arranged and coordinated in accordance with the spirit of the action on stage” (201).

Pratella, Balilla. “Manifesto of Futurist Musicians 1910.” Futurist Manifestos. Edited by Umbro Appolonio. Boston: Artworks, 2001. 31-38. “I unfurl to the freedom of air and sun the red flag of Futurism, calling to its flaming symbol such young composers as have hearts to love and fight, minds to conceive, and brows free of cowardice. And I shout with joy at feeling myself unfettered from all the chains of tradition, doubt, opportunism and vanity” (34).

Prevallet, Kristin. “Investigating the Procedure…” Telling It Slant: Avant-Garde Poetics of the 1990s. Ed. Mark Wallace & Steven Marks. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2001. 115-129. “In 1976 a series of events-in-poetry occurred that catalyzed an ideological spill still felt in thought and in action twenty years later by practitioners of antiofficial verse. These events directed poetry away from a quest for transparent meaning and toward the revelation of source texts, procedures, and language experiments within the body of the poem itself” (116).

---. “The Poetics of Gramarye: Alchemy of the Word.” A Poetics of Criticism. Edited by Juliana Spahr, Mark Wallace, Kristin Prevallet, and Pam Rehm. Buffalo: Leave Books, 1994. 153-163.

Quasha, George. “Auto-dialogue on the Transvironmental Book: Reflections on ‘The Book of Bean.’ The Book, Spiritual Instrument. Edited by Jerome Rothenburg and David Guss. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 93-98.

Queen, Khadijah. "Navigating the Body, Revealing the Audience: On Sonic Integrity, Contrast, Movement, and Endurance." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 259-262.

---. Untitled Poetics Statement. The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 247. "The voice itself was the disruption, drawing attention to both the meaning under the words an of the words simultaneoulsy, with allegorical qualities that made the work a natural fit for the prose form" (247).

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---. “As Many Questions as Answers.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.

Ranciere, Jacques. “Smoke Rings: Worker Poets in the Frnace of Louis-Phillipe.” Poetry and Cultural Studies: A Reader. Edited by Maria Damon and Ira Livingston. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2009. 237-247.

Randall, Margaret. “Notes on the New Female Voice.” Conversant Essays: Contemporary Poets on Poetry. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1990. 431-442.

---. "Piercing the Walls." Cross Worlds: Transcultural Poetics: An Anthology. Ed. Anne Waldman & Laura Wright. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2014. 276-287.

Rankine, Claudia. “The First Person in the Twenty-First Century.” After Confession: Poetry as Autobiography. Saint Paul: Graywolf Press, 2001. 132-136.

Ransom, John Crowe. “Criticism as Pure Speculation.” Criticism: Major Statements. Ed. Charles Kaplan & William Anderson. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1991.

---. “Poetry: A Note in Ontology.” Modern Poets on Modern Poetry. Ed. James Scully. London: McGraw Hill, 1966.

Rasula, Jed. “Statement on Reading in Writing.” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

---. “Notes on Genre.” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

---. “Obstructions.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.

---. From “Tabula Rasula.” The Book, Spiritual Instrument. Edited by Jerome Rothenburg and David Guss. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 82-84.

---. “Inovation and ‘Improbable Evidence.’” The Consequence of Innovation: 21st Century Poetics. Edited by Craig Dworkin. New York: Roof Books, 2008. 59-92.

Rawlings, Wendy. "Strange & Enormous & Terrible & Absurd." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 263-265.

Ray, Man. “Statement.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “L’Inquiétude.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Redon, Odilon. “Suggestive Art (excerpt).” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Reddy, Srikanth. “What’s Difficult?” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.

Reed, Ishmael. “from ‘Neo-Hoodoo Manifesto.” Poems for the Millennium: The University of California Book of Modern & Postmodern Poetry. Volume Two: From Postwar to Millennium. Ed. Jerome Rothenberg and Pierre Joris. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998.

---. “Flight to Canada.” American Poets in 1976. Ed. William Heyen. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1976.

Regan, Max and Lisa Birman. “Diversityrap.” Civil Disobediences: Poetics and Politics in Action. Ed. Anne Waldman and Lisa Birman. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2004.

Retallack, Joan. “Non-Euclidean Narrative Combustion (Or, What the Subtitles Can’t Say).” Conversant Essays: Contemporary Poets on Poetry. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1990. 491-509.

---. “Poetics Statement: Procedural Elegies: N Plus Zero.” Eleven More American Women Poets in the 21st Century: Poetics Across North America. Ed. Claudia Rankine & Lisa Sewell. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2012. 321-326. "Poetics is nothing other than an extreme noticing of how a limited case of that vast ongoing collaboration that is language works in the illuminated space-time brackets of a composition" (324).

Revell, Donald. “Dear Friend.” Lyric Postmodernisms: An Anthology of Contemporary Innovative Poetries. Edited by Reginald Shepherd. Denver: Counterpath Press, 2008.

---. Untitled essay on an Ars Poetica. What Will Suffice: Contemporary American Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Christopher Buckley and Christopher Merrill. Salt Lake City: Gibbs Smith, 1997.

Reverdy, Pierre. “On Cubism.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “The Image.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Rexilius, Andrea. Untitled Poetics Statement. The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 253. "I read and notice and probably begin to curate some ideas, build some questions, but I don't know them and then one day I just do, and that's when I begin writing again" (253).

Rexroth, Kenneth. “Disengagement….” Twentieth-Century American Poetics: Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Dana Gioia, David Mason, and Meg Scho*rke. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2004.

---. “The Heroic Object and Fernand Leger.” Poets on Painters: Essays on the Art of Painting by Twentieth-Century Poets. Edited by J.D. McClatchy. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988. 165-175.

Rich, Adrienne. “When We Dead Awaken....” Twentieth-Century American Poetics: Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Dana Gioia, David Mason, and Meg Scho*rke. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2004.

---. “Blood, Bread, and Poetry.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

---. “Excerpts from What is Found There…” 20th Century Poetry & Poetics. Fourth Edition. Ed. Gary Geddes. Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996.

---. “Poetry, Personality and Wholeness: A Response to Galway Kinnell.” A Field Guide to Contemporary Poetry and Poetics. Revised Edition. Ed. Stuart Friebert, David Walker, and David Young. Oberlin, OH: Oberlin College Press, 1997.

---. “Poetry and Experience: Statement at a Poetry Reading.” Strong Words: Modern Poets on Modern Poetry. Edited by W.N. Herbert and Matthew Hollis. Northumberland: Bloodaxe, 2000. 141-147.

Richards, I.A. “Science and Poetry.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

---. “Rhythm and Meter.” The Structure of Verse: Modern Essays on Prosody. Ed. Harvey Gross. New York: Ecco Press, 1979.

---. "The Analysis of a Poem and the Definition of a Poem." The Lyric Theory Reader: A Critical Anthology. Ed. Virginia Jackson and Yopie Prins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014. 165-177.

Richter, Hans. “Against Without For Dada.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “Towards a New World Plasticism.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Riffaterre, Michael. "The Poem's Significance." The Lyric Theory Reader: A Critical Anthology. Ed. Virginia Jackson and Yopie Prins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014. 249-265.

Rilke, Rainer Maria. “3 Letters.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

---. “from Letters to a Young Poet.” The McGraw Hill Book of Poetry. Edited by Robert DiYanni and Kraft Rompf. New York: McGraw Hill, 1993.

---. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 81.

Rimbaud, Arthur. “The ‘Voyant’ Letter to Paul Demeny.” Toward the Open Field: Poets on the Art of Poetry 1800-1950. Ed. Melissa Kwasny. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2004.

---. “The Letters of Rimbaud.” The Poet’s Vacation: Selections from Letters of Holderlin, Rimbaud & Hart Crane. Edited and translated by Wiliam Burford and Christopher Middleton. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1967. 33-44.

Ringgold, Faith. From “The French Collection, Part 1, #3: The Picnic at Giverny.” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 494-496.

Rios, Alberto. Untitled essay on an Ars Poetica. What Will Suffice: Contemporary American Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Christopher Buckley and Christopher Merrill. Salt Lake City: Gibbs Smith, 1997.

Rivard, David. Untitled essay on an Ars Poetica. What Will Suffice: Contemporary American Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Christopher Buckley and Christopher Merrill. Salt Lake City: Gibbs Smith, 1997.

Robertson, Lisa. “How Pastoral: A Manifesto.” Telling It Slant: Avant-Garde Poetics of the 1990s. Ed. Mark Wallace & Steven Marks. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2001. 21-26. “Consider that the imaginary generates landscapes for political futures. To people these landscapes with out own desires and histories, we must implement pastoral as a seedy generic artifice and deny it the natural and hegemonic position of political ideology” (23).

---. “Poetics Statement: Soft Architecture: A Manifesto.” Eleven More American Women Poets in the 21st Century: Poetics Across North America. Ed. Claudia Rankine & Lisa Sewell. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2012. 361-364. "Practice description. Description is mystical" (363).

Robinson, Elizabeth. “Persona and the Mystical Poem.” The Monkey & The Wrench: Essays Into Contemporary Poetics. Akron, OH: University of Akron Press, 2011.

---. "Constellation and Dilemma." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 266-268.

---. "Reading and Reading." Reading the Difficulties: Dialogues with Contemporary American Innovative Poetry. Ed. Thomas Fink and Judith Halden-Sullivan. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2014. 18-27. "It's a truism that any text worth reading is worth reading again" (18).

Robinson, Jeffrey C. “The Influence of Shelley on Twentieth- and Twenty-First-Century Avant-Garde Poetry: A Survey.” Active Romanticism: The Radical Impulse in Nineteenth-Century and Contemporary Poetic Practice. Ed. Julie Carr and Jeffrey C. Robinson. Tuscaloosa, AL: University of Alabama Press, 2015. 176-96.

Robinson, Kit. “7 Days in Another Town.” In the American Tree. Ed. Ron Silliman. Orono, ME: National Poetry Foundation, 1986.

---. “Raising Collateral.” A Guide to Poetics Journal: Writing in the Expanded Field 1982-1998. Ed. Lyn Hejinian & Barrett Watten. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2013. 257-260. "In writing the play Collateral, I had the advantage of knowing not only that it would be produced but that it would be produced by a group willing to take on any challenge to the director and actors I might care to throw their way. I had license to write a problematic work" (257).

---. “Time and Materials: The Workplace, Dreams, and Writing.” A Guide to Poetics Journal: Writing in the Expanded Field 1982-1998. Ed. Lyn Hejinian & Barrett Watten. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2013. 353-366. "When the language of the workplace is excerpted and reframed as part of writing in its widest, most generative sense, its instrumentality is sacrificed. The loss of practical meaning sets off a concomitant release of potential energy. The power stored in the language is released like an electron in a nuclear reaction" (358).

Robinson, Nick. “Subtext in Collateral.” A Guide to Poetics Journal: Writing in the Expanded Field 1982-1998. Ed. Lyn Hejinian & Barrett Watten. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2013. 260-269. "The particular achievement of Collateral lies in its formal precision as a vehicle for contradiction and change" (267).

Roche, Denis. “Le Mécrit.” Poems for the Millennium: The University of California Book of Modern & Postmodern Poetry. Volume Two: From Postwar to Millennium. Ed. Jerome Rothenberg and Pierre Joris. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998.

Rodefer, Stephen. “Preface to Four Lectures.” In the American Tree. Ed. Ron Silliman. Orono, ME: National Poetry Foundation, 1986.

Rodney, Janet. “Council on Counterpoetics” (with 10 others). Poems for the Millennium: The University of California Book of Modern & Postmodern Poetry. Volume Two: From Postwar to Millennium. Ed. Jerome Rothenberg and Pierre Joris. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998.

Roethke, Theodore. “What Do I Like?” The Structure of Verse: Modern Essays on Prosody. Ed. Harvey Gross. New York: Ecco Press, 1979.

---. “from Some Remarks on Rhythm.” 20th Century Poetry & Poetics. Fourth Edition. Ed. Gary Geddes. Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996.

---. “from Open Letter.” 20th Century Poetry & Poetics. Fourth Edition. Ed. Gary Geddes. Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996.

---. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 83.

Ronk, Martha. “Poetics of Failure.” Lyric Postmodernisms: An Anthology of Contemporary Innovative Poetries. Edited by Reginald Shepherd. Denver: Counterpath Press, 2008.

Rose, Tricia. “Black Texts/Black Contexts.” Poetry and Cultural Studies: A Reader. Edited by Maria Damon and Ira Livingston. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2009. 195-198.

Ross, Andrew. “The Death of Lady Day.” A Guide to Poetics Journal: Writing in the Expanded Field 1982-1998. Ed. Lyn Hejinian & Barrett Watten. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2013. 367-377. "For Frank O'Hara's man of taste, everyday life things matter, not because they are a way of advertising wealth or power, nor because everything matters equally, but because their value is linked to how people use them to make sense of their world" (369).

Ross, Kristin. “Rimbaud and the Transformation of Social Space.” Poetry and Cultural Studies: A Reader. Edited by Maria Damon and Ira Livingston. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2009. 248-265.

Roth, Dieter. “Introduction to Books and Graphics.” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 389-394.

Rothenberg, Diane. “Council on Counterpoetics” (with 10 others). Poems for the Millennium: The University of California Book of Modern & Postmodern Poetry. Volume Two: From Postwar to Millennium. Ed. Jerome Rothenberg and Pierre Joris. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998.

Rothenberg, Jerome. “New Models….” Postmodern American Poetry: A Norton Anthology. Ed. Paul Hoover. New York: W. W. Norton, 1994.

---. “Ethnopoetics & Politic…” The Politics of Poetic Form: Poetry and Public Policy. Ed. Charles Bernstein. New York: Roof Books, 1998.

---. “Council on Counterpoetics” (with 10 others). Poems for the Millennium: The University of California Book of Modern & Postmodern Poetry. Volume Two: From Postwar to Millennium. Ed. Jerome Rothenberg and Pierre Joris. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998.

---. “Changing the Present, Changing the Past: A New Poetics.” Talking Poetics from Naropa Institute: Annals of the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics. Volume Two. Ed. Anne Waldman and Marilyn Webb. Boulder: Shambhala, 1978.

---. “Big Jewish Book.” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

---. “The Poetics & Ethnopoetics of the Book & Writing.” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 7-16.

---. “The Search for a Primal Poetics.” Conversant Essays: Contemporary Poets on Poetry. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1990. 414-420.

---. “The Construction of Poems for the Millennium, Volume Three and the Poems It Engendered.” Active Romanticism: The Radical Impulse in Nineteenth-Century and Contemporary Poetic Practice. Ed. Julie Carr and Jeffrey C. Robinson. Tuscaloosa, AL: University of Alabama Press, 2015. 91-98.

Roubaud, Jacques. “Hypothesis of the Compact (excerpt).” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Row, Jess. “To Whom It May Concern.” The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. Ed. Claudia Rankine, Beth Loffreda, & Max King Cap. Albany, NY: Fence Books, 2015. 60-63.

Rudman, Mark. “Word Roots: Notes on Free Verse.” Conversant Essays: Contemporary Poets on Poetry. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1990. 153-162.

Rukeyser, Muriel. “from The Life of Poetry.” Twentieth-Century American Poetics: Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Dana Gioia, David Mason, and Meg Scho*rke. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2004.

Ruocco, Joanna. "Living with Language: Our Body of Need." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 269-270.

Russolo, Luigi. “The Art of Noises (excerpt).” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Ruy-Sánchez, Alberto. "Savoring Death in Mexico." Translated by Rhonda Dahl Buchanan. Cross Worlds: Transcultural Poetics: An Anthology. Ed. Anne Waldman & Laura Wright. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2014. 288-305.

Ryan, Michael. “On the Nature of Poetry.” Claims for Poetry. Ed. Donald Hall. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000.

St. John, Primus. “The Way the World Has Entered.” American Poets in 1976. Ed. William Heyen. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1976.

Sadoff, Ira. “Open Letter.” The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. Ed. Claudia Rankine, Beth Loffreda, & Max King Cap. Albany, NY: Fence Books, 2015. 238-241.

Saint- Point, Valentine de. “Futurist Manifesto of Lust 1913.” Futurist Manifestos. Edited by Umbro Appolonio. Boston: Artworks, 2001. 70-74.

Samaran, William J. From “Tongues of Men and Angels.” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 334-338.

Sanchez, Sonia. “In This Place Called America.” Civil Disobediences: Poetics and Politics in Action. Ed. Anne Waldman and Lisa Birman. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2004.

Sanders, Ed. “Investigative Poetry: The Content of History Will Be Poetry.” Talking Poetics from Naropa Institute: Annals of the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics. Volume Two. Ed. Anne Waldman and Marilyn Webb. Boulder: Shambhala, 1978.

---. “A Tribute to Sappho.” Civil Disobediences: Poetics and Politics in Action. Ed. Anne Waldman and Lisa Birman. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2004.

Sant’ Elia, Antonio. “Manifesto of Futurist Architecture 1914.” Futurist Manifestos. Edited by Umbro Appolonio. Boston: Artworks, 2001. 160-172. “We must invent and rebuild the Futurist city like an immense and tumultuous shipyard, agile, mobile, and dynamic in every detail; and the Futurist house must be like a gigantic machine” (170).

Santayana, George. “The Elements and Functions of Poetry.” American Poetry and Poetics: Poems and Critical Documents from the Puritans to Robert Frost. Edited by Daniel G. Hoffman. New York: Anchor Books, 1962.

Santos, Sherod. Untitled essay on an Ars Poetica. What Will Suffice: Contemporary American Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Christopher Buckley and Christopher Merrill. Salt Lake City: Gibbs Smith, 1997.

Scalapino, Leslie. “Pattern&—and the ‘Simulacral.’” A Guide to Poetics Journal: Writing in the Expanded Field 1982-1998. Ed. Lyn Hejinian & Barrett Watten. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2013. 270-281. "The way things are seen in a time is that period of time; and is the composition of that time. The way things are seen is unique in any moment, as a new formation of events, objects, and cultural abstration" (270).

---. "from 'Objects in the Terrifying Tense Longing from Taking Place.'” A Poetics of Criticism. Edited by Juliana Spahr, Mark Wallace, Kristin Prevallet, and Pam Rehm. Buffalo: Leave Books, 1994. 37-41. "There is the illusion of spontaneous creation without our noticing it" (38).

--- and Ron Silliman. “What/Person? From an Exchange” A Guide to Poetics Journal: Writing in the Expanded Field 1982-1998. Ed. Lyn Hejinian & Barrett Watten. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2013. 378-392. "Your argument as I understand it is that white heterosexual men in groups (i.e., elites being free of their social condition are more able to write formally innovative work than are women, gays, and minorities who by virtue of being caught in their social condition have the need to 'have their stories told' and therefore tend to write 'conventional' narrative" (379).

Schelling, Andrew. “Hobson-Jobson: An Account of Sanskrit Poetics in Homage to John Cage.” A Poetics of Criticism. Edited by Juliana Spahr, Mark Wallace, Kristin Prevallet, and Pam Rehm. Buffalo: Leave Books, 1994. 147-151. "There are daemons that inhabit language" (147).

Schjeldahl, Peter. “Poetry: A Job Description.” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

Schmitz, Dennis. “Gorky Street: Syntax and Context.” A Field Guide to Contemporary Poetry and Poetics. Revised Edition. Ed. Stuart Friebert, David Walker, and David Young. Oberlin, OH: Oberlin College Press, 1997.

Schneeman, Carolee. “Interior Scroll.” Poems for the Millennium: The University of California Book of Modern & Postmodern Poetry. Volume Two: From Postwar to Millennium. Ed. Jerome Rothenberg and Pierre Joris. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998.

---. “Up to and Including Her Limits.” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 473-475.

Scholem, Gershom. “The Oral & the Written: ‘There is No Written Torah Here on Earth.’” The Book, Spiritual Instrument. Edited by Jerome Rothenburg and David Guss. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 136-138.

Schomburg, Zachary. Untitled Poetics Statement. The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 259. "I write these poems to give birth, to kill, to give birth to the one thing I promise will kill me" (259).

Shimoda, Brandon. Untitled Poetics Statement. The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 265. "My task becomes to transcribe, without judgement" (265).

Schulman, Grace. “Notes on the Development…” Antaeus. Poetry & Poetics. Summer / Autumn, 1978. Vol. 30/31.

---. “Marianne Moore and E. McKnight Kauffer: Their Friendship, Their Concerns.” 241-247.

Schultz, Susan M. “Towards a ‘Hoale’ Poetics: A Partial Memoir of My year as President of the Hawaii Literary Arts Council.” A Poetics of Criticism. Edited by Juliana Spahr, Mark Wallace, Kristin Prevallet, and Pam Rehm. Buffalo: Leave Books, 1994. 22-31. "Authenticity, identity, family, sentimentality, essentialism, nostalgia: words to make a poststructuralist anti-humanist weep. I confess to several bouts of it myself" (26).

Schuyler, James. “Poet and Painter….” The New American Poetry 1945-1960. Ed. Donald Allen. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2000.

---. “The Painting of Jane Freilicher.” Poets on Painters: Essays on the Art of Painting by Twentieth-Century Poets. Edited by J.D. McClatchy. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988. 257-263.

Schwartz, Delmore. “The Vocation of the Poet….” The Poet’s Work. Ed. Reginald Gibbons. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1979.

Schwartz, Leonard. “A Flicker at the Edge of Things…” Telling It Slant: Avant-Garde Poetics of the 1990s. Ed. Mark Wallace & Steven Marks. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2001. 95-114 . “I thought here to examine some of the current possibilities of poetry, that art most identical to with language, and specifically to discuss the possibility for what I have referred to in several other essays and locales as transcendental lyric, a kind of poem that would reclaim, in as contemporary a way as possible, much of the ground that it is presumed poetry lost to sophistication and to social science – a kind of lyric in the mode of Stevens’s tune beyond us yet ourselves” (97-98).

Schwitters, Kurt. “Cow Manifesto.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “i (a manifesto).” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Schwitters, Kurt and Raoul Hausmann. “PIN Manifesto…” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “A Fancy.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

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---. “Open Letter.” The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. Ed. Claudia Rankine, Beth Loffreda, & Max King Cap. Albany, NY: Fence Books, 2015. 219-221.

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---. Untitled Poetics Statement. The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 281. "So many natural gaps occur in my thinking in the heat of composition, sometimes the fact that a work is lyrical is totally lost on me" (281).

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---. “Migratory Meaning: The Parsimony Principle in the Poem” A Guide to Poetics Journal: Writing in the Expanded Field 1982-1998. Ed. Lyn Hejinian & Barrett Watten. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2013. 141-157. "There persists the lack of adequate shared vocabulary with which to think and speak of the poem as we find it" (142).

--- and Leslie Scalapino. “What/Person? From an Exchange” A Guide to Poetics Journal: Writing in the Expanded Field 1982-1998. Ed. Lyn Hejinian & Barrett Watten. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2013. 378-392. "For the poet trying to think her or his way through the poem, this means that social context must be understood as dramatically active. A white male 'new formalist'--Dana Gioia, Mark Jarman, Dick Allen, Frederick Feirstein, or Timothy Steele--seeks maximum hypotaxix, a poetry that reinforces the most traditional modes of privilege. A lesbian involved in the same project, such as Marilyn Hacker, has to be read differently. Her work challenges the possessors of privilege but not privilege itself--indeed, it longs for it" (390).

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---. “Images and ‘Images.’” A Field Guide to Contemporary Poetry and Poetics. Revised Edition. Ed. Stuart Friebert, David Walker, and David Young. Oberlin, OH: Oberlin College Press, 1997.

---. “My Insomnia and I.” A Field Guide to Contemporary Poetry and Poetics. Revised Edition. Ed. Stuart Friebert, David Walker, and David Young. Oberlin, OH: Oberlin College Press, 1997.

Simpson, Louis. “Reflections on Narrative Poetry.” Twentieth-Century American Poetry. Ed. Gioia, et al. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2004.

---. Untitled Essay on a poem. Ecstatic Occasions, Expedient Forms: 85 Leading Contemporary Poets Select and Comment on Their Poems. Ed. David Lehman. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2001.

---. Untitled essay on a poem. Fifty Contemporary Poets: The Creative Process. Ed. Alberta T. Turner. New York: David McKay Co., 1977.

---. “Rolling Up.” American Poets in 1976. Ed. William Heyen. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1976.

Smith, Abraham. Untitled Poetics Statement. The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 289-290. "i write, as the ancients would have it, like a bear. the saying goes like this: the mother licks the shapeless cub into something beary. ditto me as per the poem" (289).

Smith, Barbara Hernstein. “Closure and Anti-closure in Modern Poetry.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

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Smith, Dave. “Sailing the Back River.” American Poets in 1976. Ed. William Heyen. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1976.

Smith, Keith A. “The Book as Physical Object.” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 54-70.

Smith, Rod. “A Tract.” Telling It Slant: Avant-Garde Poetics of the 1990s. Ed. Mark Wallace & Steven Marks. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2001. 395-403. “& so Paul Mann is wrong, the dialectic quite clearly exists, it is between history & not-history. Its syntheses is poetry” (400).

Smith, Rod. From “CIA Sentences.” A Poetics of Criticism. Edited by Juliana Spahr, Mark Wallace, Kristin Prevallet, and Pam Rehm. Buffalo: Leave Books, 1994. 215-221.

Smith, Stevie. “My Muse.” Strong Words: Modern Poets on Modern Poetry. Edited by W.N. Herbert and Matthew Hollis. Northumberland: Bloodaxe, 2000. 148-149.

Smith, Tracy K. “My Next Great Poem.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.

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Sondheim, Alan. “Codeworld.” Contemporary Poetics. Ed. Louis Armand. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2007. 286-289. “Is codework a minor art, minor literature? What is the point of repeatedly shaking the scaffolding – if not the emergence, in the future, of an other or another approach, or an other, being or organism, for which codework now both provides augury and its weakness as portal/welcoming?” (288).

Sontag, Kate. “Mother May I?: Writing with Love.” After Confession: Poetry as Autobiography. Saint Paul: Graywolf Press, 2001. 151-157.

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---. “A, B, C: Reading Against Emily Dickinson and Gertrude Stein.” A Poetics of Criticism. Edited by Juliana Spahr, Mark Wallace, Kristin Prevallet, and Pam Rehm. Buffalo: Leave Books, 1994. 281-292.

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Stafford, William. “Some Arguments Against Good Diction.” Twentieth-Century American Poetics: Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Dana Gioia, David Mason, and Meg Scho*rke. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2004.

---. “A Way of Writing.” Claims for Poetry. Ed. Donald Hall. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000.

---. Untitled essay on a poem. Fifty Contemporary Poets: The Creative Process. Ed. Alberta T. Turner. New York: David McKay Co., 1977.

---. “Making a Poem / Starting a Car on Ice.” American Poets in 1976. Ed. William Heyen. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1976.

---. Untitled essay on an Ars Poetica. What Will Suffice: Contemporary American Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Christopher Buckley and Christopher Merrill. Salt Lake City: Gibbs Smith, 1997.

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Stefans, Brian Kim. “Remote Parsee: An Alternative Grammar of Asian North American Poetry.” Telling It Slant: Avant-Garde Poetics of the 1990s. Ed. Mark Wallace & Steven Marks. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2001. 43-75. “A chronological history of Asian American poetry is out of the question for reasons stated above but also because certain works, like Tanaka’s writing for JES in the late seventies and early eighties and Cha’s writings and films of the eighties, have suffered from an obscurity that places them outside of any cause-effect nomenclature necessary to comfortable narrative” (45).

---. “Stops and Rebels: a critique of hypertext [remix].” The Consequence of Innovation: 21st Century Poetics. Edited by Craig Dworkin. New York: Roof Books, 2008. 151-184.

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---. “Book.” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 103.

---. “Explaining ‘a rose is a rose is a rose.’” Strong Words: Modern Poets on Modern Poetry. Edited by W.N. Herbert and Matthew Hollis. Northumberland: Bloodaxe, 2000. 54-55.

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Stevenson, Anne. “Writing as a Woman.” Twentieth-Century American Poetics: Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Dana Gioia, David Mason, and Meg Scho*rke. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2004.

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Svalina, Mathias. Untitled Poetics Statement. The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 303. "A black seed (from an apple?)" (303).

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Swensen, Cole. “Artist’s Statement.” Lyric Postmodernisms: An Anthology of Contemporary Innovative Poetries. Edited by Reginald Shepherd. Denver: Counterpath Press, 2008.

---. “A Brief History of the Early Prose Poem.” Civil Disobediences: Poetics and Politics in Action. Ed. Anne Waldman and Lisa Birman. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2004.

---. “Creative Unknowing.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.

---. “Response to “Hybrid Aesthetics and Its Discontents.” The Monkey & The Wrench: Essays Into Contemporary Poetics. Akron, OH: University of Akron Press, 2011.

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Taggart, John. “Were You: Notes and a Poem for Michael Palmer.” Code of Signals: Recent Writings in Poetics. Ed. Michael Palmer. Berkeley: North Atlantic Books, 1983.

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---. “Of The Power of the Word.” Conversant Essays: Contemporary Poets on Poetry. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1990. 59-64.

Tagore, Rabindranath. “Poet Yeats.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

Talamantez, Ines. “Council on Counterpoetics” (with 10 others). Poems for the Millennium: The University of California Book of Modern & Postmodern Poetry. Volume Two: From Postwar to Millennium. Ed. Jerome Rothenberg and Pierre Joris. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998.

Tarn, Nathaniel. “Council on Counterpoetics” (with 10 others). Poems for the Millennium: The University of California Book of Modern & Postmodern Poetry. Volume Two: From Postwar to Millennium. Ed. Jerome Rothenberg and Pierre Joris. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998.

Tate, Allen. “Tension in Poetry.” Twentieth-Century American Poetics: Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Dana Gioia, David Mason, and Meg Scho*rke. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2004.

Tate, James. Untitled Essay on a poem. Ecstatic Occasions, Expedient Forms: 85 Leading Contemporary Poets Select and Comment on Their Poems. Ed. David Lehman. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2001.

---. Untitled essay on a poem. Fifty Contemporary Poets: The Creative Process. Ed. Alberta T. Turner. New York: David McKay Co., 1977.

---. “Hart Crane.” Prose Keys to Modern Poetry. Edited by Karl Shapiro. Evanston: Row Peterson & Co., 1962. 213-222.

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Taylor, Steven. “Remember the Future: Archival Poetics and the War on Memory.” Beats at Naropa. Ed. Anne Waldman and Laura Wright. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2009.

---. “Beauty Trouble: Identity and Difference in the Tradition of the Aesthetic.” Civil Disobediences: Poetics and Politics in Action. Ed. Anne Waldman and Lisa Birman. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2004.

Taylor, Tess. “Of Whiteness, Obama, and the So-Called Postracial.” The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. Ed. Claudia Rankine, Beth Loffreda, & Max King Cap. Albany, NY: Fence Books, 2015. 95-105 .

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Tedlock, Barbara. "Hidden Female Shamanic Traditions." Cross Worlds: Transcultural Poetics: An Anthology. Ed. Anne Waldman & Laura Wright. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2014. 76-89.

Tedlock, Dennis. “Toward a Poetics of Polyphony and Translatability.” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 257-278.

---. “What the Popol Vuh Tells about Itself.” The Book, Spiritual Instrument. Edited by Jerome Rothenburg and David Guss. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 59-61.

---. "Parallel Verse, Translation, The Popol Vuh." Cross Worlds: Transcultural Poetics: An Anthology. Ed. Anne Waldman & Laura Wright. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2014. 66-75.

Tejada, Roberto. "Imperatives." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 305-308.

---. Untitled Poetics Statement. The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 309. "I want two sets of things: those pertaining to an alleged home and those evicted from it" (309).

Theall, Donald F. “The Avant-Garde and the Wake of Radical Modernism.” Contemporary Poetics. Ed. Louis Armand. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2007. 57-66. “Echoes of scientific and technological interests of many major artists from Blake to Poe to Valéry and Duchamp permeate [Finnegan’s Wake]…Joyce combined a particular balance of traditional science and mathematics with recent contemporary developments and transformations as well as with esoteric and alchemical speculation and ancient philosophy…” (60).

Theune, Michael. “No Laughing Matter: The Humorless Hybrid.” The Monkey & The Wrench: Essays Into Contemporary Poetics. Akron, OH: University of Akron Press, 2011.

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---. “Notes on the Art of Poetry.” Modern Poets on Modern Poetry. Ed. James Scully. London: McGraw Hill, 1966.

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Thomas, Lorenzo. “Is it Xerox or Memorex?” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

---. “How to See through Poetry: Myth Perception and History.” Civil Disobediences: Poetics and Politics in Action. Ed. Anne Waldman and Lisa Birman. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2004.

---. "The Marks are Waiting.” A Guide to Poetics Journal: Writing in the Expanded Field 1982-1998. Ed. Lyn Hejinian & Barrett Watten. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2013. 393-396. "If history can still be understood as a record of the deeds of leaders, then recent history of the United States is the record of bizarre plots and frantic attempts to cover their behinds performed by an amazingly conscienceless batch of born-again hypocrites and felons-in-waiting" (395).

---. "Talking Back to Whitman." Cross Worlds: Transcultural Poetics: An Anthology. Ed. Anne Waldman & Laura Wright. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2014. 100-114.

Thon, Melanie Rae. "The Ethics of Perception:"The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 309-312.

Thoroeau, Henry David. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 93.

Tillman, Lynne. "Breaking What is Broken." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 313-315.

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Tofts, Darren. “Epigrams, Particle Theory, and Hypertext.” Contemporary Poetics. Ed. Louis Armand. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2007. 221-232. “If literacy is concerned with letters as fundamental, irreducible particles of meaning, then how can we transport the idea of the particle into the digital realm, the online environment and the hypertextual web? Such a project is fraught with the potential of being unreceivable, since outlining a post literate digital literacy is outside the hermeneutical circle of literacy itself. So what follows is a translation of a future model of digital literacy” (220-221).

Tolbert, TC. "Red, Left. Light Blue, Right. Or, So Many Ways to Say Yes." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 316-319.

---. Untitled Poetics Statement. The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 315. "Is confession a form of intimacy? Is rejection? Is intimacy why violence exists?" (315).

Tolstoy, Leo. “What Is Art?” Criticism: Major Statements. Ed. Charles Kaplan & William Anderson. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1991.

---. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 95.

Tomasula, Steve. "I Only / Never I." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 320-321.

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---. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 97.

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van Doesburg, Theo [I.K. Bonset]. “Characteristics of Dadaism (excerpt).” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

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Waldrep, G.C. “Mailing the Black Box.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.

Waldrop, Rosmarie. “Alarms & Excursions.” The Politics of Poetic Form: Poetry and Public Policy. Ed. Charles Bernstein. New York: Roof Books, 1998.

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---. “Roadie.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.

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---. “Object Status.” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

---. “Writing and Capitalism.” The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

---. “Total Syntax: The Work in the World.” Artifice & Indeterminacy: An Anthology of New Poetics. Ed. Christopher Beach. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1998.

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---. “The Politics of Style.” A Guide to Poetics Journal: Writing in the Expanded Field 1982-1998. Ed. Lyn Hejinian & Barrett Watten. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2013. 158-168. "While 'the book' can be thought of as a kind of template or outer form, style operates within the medium of language itself, altering that medium, which includes ideology" (159).

Webb, Phyllis. “On The Line.” 20th Century Poetry & Poetics. Fourth Edition. Ed. Gary Geddes. Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996.

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Weiner, Joshua. “‘There Are No Rats’: Some Figuring on Race.” The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. Ed. Claudia Rankine, Beth Loffreda, & Max King Cap. Albany, NY: Fence Books, 2015. 123-139.

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Welish, Marjorie. Untitled Essay on a poem. Ecstatic Occasions, Expedient Forms: 85 Leading Contemporary Poets Select and Comment on Their Poems. Ed. David Lehman. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2001.

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Wellek, René. "Genre Theory, the Lyric, and Erlebnis." The Lyric Theory Reader: A Critical Anthology. Ed. Virginia Jackson and Yopie Prins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014. 40-52.

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Welty, Eudora. “Place in Fiction.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

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Werner, Marta. “Divinations: Emily Dickinson’s Scriptive Economics.” A Poetics of Criticism. Edited by Juliana Spahr, Mark Wallace, Kristin Prevallet, and Pam Rehm. Buffalo: Leave Books, 1994. 87-96. "In Dickinson's late compositions, two broad scriptural 'styles,' two hands--one for rought copy drafts, another for fair copy drafts--reflect and translate into spcae two broad interior movements in the mind" (89).

Weston, Jesse L. From “From the Ritual to Romance: The Fisher King.” Prose Keys to Modern Poetry. Edited by Karl Shapiro. Evanston: Row Peterson & Co., 1962. 75-90.

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Wharton, Edith. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 101.

Wheeler, Susan. “Poetics Statement.” American Poets in the 21st Century: The New Poetics. Edited by Claudia Rankine and Lisa Sewell. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2007.

Whistler, James Abbott McNeill. “The Ten O’Clock.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Whitman, Walt. “The Poem of America.” The McGraw Hill Book of Poetry. Edited by Robert DiYanni and Kraft Rompf. New York: McGraw Hill, 1993.

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---. “From Specimen Days.” American Poetry and Poetics: Poems and Critical Documents from the Puritans to Robert Frost. Edited by Daniel G. Hoffman. New York: Anchor Books, 1962.

---. “Edgar Poe’s Significance.” American Poetry and Poetics: Poems and Critical Documents from the Puritans to Robert Frost. Edited by Daniel G. Hoffman. New York: Anchor Books, 1962.

---. “My Tribute to Four Poets.” American Poetry and Poetics: Poems and Critical Documents from the Puritans to Robert Frost. Edited by Daniel G. Hoffman. New York: Anchor Books, 1962.

---. “Death of Longfellow.” American Poetry and Poetics: Poems and Critical Documents from the Puritans to Robert Frost. Edited by Daniel G. Hoffman. New York: Anchor Books, 1962.

---. “A Backward Glance O’er Travel’d Roads.” American Poetry and Poetics: Poems and Critical Documents from the Puritans to Robert Frost. Edited by Daniel G. Hoffman. New York: Anchor Books, 1962.

---. “Walt Whitman to Ralph Waldo Emerson.” The Poetics of The New American Poetry. Edited by Donald Allen and Warren Tallman. New York: Grove Press, 1973.

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White, Simone. “Flibbertigibbet in a White Room / Competencies.” The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. Ed. Claudia Rankine, Beth Loffreda, & Max King Cap. Albany, NY: Fence Books, 2015. 33-36.

Whittemore, Reed. “Poetry as Discovery.” Poets on Poetry. Ed. Howard Nemerov. New York: Basic Books, 1966.

Wilbur, Richard. “Poetry and Happiness.” Claims for Poetry. Ed. Donald Hall. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000.

---. Untitled Essay on a poem. Ecstatic Occasions, Expedient Forms: 85 Leading Contemporary Poets Select and Comment on Their Poems. Ed. David Lehman. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2001.

---. “On My Own Work.” Poets on Poetry. Ed. Howard Nemerov. New York: Basic Books, 1966.

---. Untitled essay on a poem. Fifty Contemporary Poets: The Creative Process. Ed. Alberta T. Turner. New York: David McKay Co., 1977.

Wilde, Oscar. “The Poets and the People: By One of the Latter.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “Preface to The Picture of Dorian Gray.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 103.

---. From “The Decay of Dying.” Prose Keys to Modern Poetry. Edited by Karl Shapiro. Evanston: Row Peterson & Co., 1962. 55-56.

Williams. C.K. “Contexts: An Essay on Intentions.” Strong Words: Modern Poets on Modern Poetry. Edited by W.N. Herbert and Matthew Hollis. Northumberland: Bloodaxe, 2000. 184-187.

---. “The Poet and History.” Conversant Essays: Contemporary Poets on Poetry. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1990. 388-398.

Williams, Miller. “The Line in Poetry.” Antaeus. Poetry & Poetics. Summer / Autumn, 1978. Vol. 30/31.

Williams, Tyrone. “The Human Teacher.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.

---. "Reginald and Me." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 330-332.

Williams, William Carlos. “Projective Verse and….” The Poet’s Work. Ed. Reginald Gibbons. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1979.

---. “A New Measure.” Twentieth-Century American Poetics: Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Dana Gioia, David Mason, and Meg Scho*rke. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2004.

---. “The Poem as a Field of Action.” Twentieth-Century American Poetics: Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Dana Gioia, David Mason, and Meg Scho*rke. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2004.

---. “Preface to Kora in Hell.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

---. “Edgar Allan Poe.” The Poetics of The New American Poetry. Edited by Donald Allen and Warren Tallman. New York: Grove Press, 1973.

---. “The Work of Gertrude Stein.” The Poetics of The New American Poetry. Edited by Donald Allen and Warren Tallman. New York: Grove Press, 1973.

---. “Introduction to The Wedge.” The Poetics of The New American Poetry. Edited by Donald Allen and Warren Tallman. New York: Grove Press, 1973.

---. “William Carlos Williams to Robert Creeley.” The Poetics of The New American Poetry. Edited by Donald Allen and Warren Tallman. New York: Grove Press, 1973.

---. “Letter.” Antaeus. Poetry & Poetics. Summer / Autumn, 1978. Vol. 30/31.

---. “The Pluralism of Experience.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “On Measure—Statement for Cid Corman.” 20th Century Poetry & Poetics. Fourth Edition. Ed. Gary Geddes. Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996.

---. “A Matisse and Painting” and “Painting in the American Grain.” Poets on Painters: Essays on the Art of Painting by Twentieth-Century Poets. Edited by J.D. McClatchy. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988. 25-37.

---. From “In the American Grain.” Prose Keys to Modern Poetry. Edited by Karl Shapiro. Evanston: Row Peterson & Co., 1962. 203-206.

---. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 105.

Williamson, Alan. “Stories about the Self.” After Confession: Poetry as Autobiography. Saint Paul: Graywolf Press, 2001. 51-70.

Willis, Elizabeth. “The Arena in the Garden…” Telling It Slant: Avant-Garde Poetics of the 1990s. Ed. Mark Wallace & Steven Marks. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2001. 225-235. “Anywhere from Aristotle to Dickinson to Lorca to Spicer it has been acknowledged that the lyric poem comes not strictly from within but from elsewhere; it is not self-expressive except to the extent that ideas of self or voice are never entirely absent from the tonal shadings of language. To overcome the inherited structure of the everyday – the quotidian clock – the lyric poem must catalyze the mind. In this context Pound’s metaphor of the dynamo makes sense; it “blasts” apart and reconstructs something alternative to literature’s received ideas” (229).

---. Lyric Postmodernisms: An Anthology of Contemporary Innovative Poetries. Edited by Reginald Shepherd. Denver: Counterpath Press, 2008.

---. “Hero’s Skirt.” A Poetics of Criticism. Edited by Juliana Spahr, Mark Wallace, Kristin Prevallet, and Pam Rehm. Buffalo: Leave Books, 1994. 165-172.

---. “Bright Ellipses: The Botanic Garden, Meteoric Flowers and Leaves of Grass.” Active Romanticism: The Radical Impulse in Nineteenth-Century and Contemporary Poetic Practice. Ed. Julie Carr and Jeffrey C. Robinson. Tuscaloosa, AL: University of Alabama Press, 2015. 18-30.

Wilson, L. Lamar. "Queer Black Avant-Garde Poetics: On Being Guilty of Excessive Darkness in the First Degree." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 333-336.

Wilson, Peter Lamborn. “Hieroglyphics and Money.” Civil Disobediences: Poetics and Politics in Action. Ed. Anne Waldman and Lisa Birman. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2004.

---. "Ploughing the Clouds." Cross Worlds: Transcultural Poetics: An Anthology. Ed. Anne Waldman & Laura Wright. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2014. 35-57

Wilson, Ronaldo V. "Living Being: After the Avant-Garde." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 337-339.

---. Untitled Poetics Statement. The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 339-340. "To be an anomaly creates drama, reveals risks, and opens possibilities" (339).

---. “How do we invent language of racial identity—that is not necessarily constructing the ‘scene of instruction’ about race but create the linguistic material of racial speech/thought?” The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. Ed. Claudia Rankine, Beth Loffreda, & Max King Cap. Albany, NY: Fence Books, 2015. 75-78.

Wiman, Christian. “A Piece of Prose.” Twentieth-Century American Poetics: Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Dana Gioia, David Mason, and Meg Scho*rke. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2004.

Wimsatt, W.K. “The Concrete Universal.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

Wimsatt, W.K. and Monroe C. Beardsley. “The Concept of Meter…” The Structure of Verse: Modern Essays on Prosody. Ed. Harvey Gross. New York: Ecco Press, 1979.

--- and ---. "The Intentional Fallacy." The Lyric Theory Reader: A Critical Anthology. Ed. Virginia Jackson and Yopie Prins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014. 201-210.

Winters, Yvor. “…The Testament of Stone.” Twentieth-Century American Poetics: Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Dana Gioia, David Mason, and Meg Scho*rke. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2004.

---. “The Audible Reading of Poetry.” The Structure of Verse: Modern Essays on Prosody. Ed. Harvey Gross. New York: Ecco Press, 1979.

Wojahn, David. Untitled essay on an Ars Poetica. What Will Suffice: Contemporary American Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Christopher Buckley and Christopher Merrill. Salt Lake City: Gibbs Smith, 1997.

Wolf, Reva. “Thinking You Know” A Guide to Poetics Journal: Writing in the Expanded Field 1982-1998. Ed. Lyn Hejinian & Barrett Watten. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2013. 397-413. "Is it possible to know something and then again to not really know it? A great deal of knowledge we possess contains this sort of uncertainty...The shaky status of this day-to-day knowledge is a recurrent topic in John Ashbery's poetry" (397).

Woolf, Virginia. “Shakespeare’s Sister, from A Room of One’s Own.” Criticism: Major Statements. Ed. Charles Kaplan & William Anderson. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1991.

---. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 107.

Wordsworth, William. “Preface to Lyrical Ballads.” Criticism: Major Statements. Ed. Charles Kaplan & William Anderson. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1991.

---. “Observations and a Passage on Poetic Diction.” The Prelude to Poetry: The English Poets in Defence and Praise of Their Own Art. Ed. Ernest Rhys. London: J.M. Dent, 1927.

Wormser, Baron. “Soul Music: Religion and Poetry.” Conversant Essays: Contemporary Poets on Poetry. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1990. 564-568.

Wright, C.D. “A Taxable Matter.” A Field Guide to Contemporary Poetry and Poetics. Revised Edition. Ed. Stuart Friebert, David Walker, and David Young. Oberlin, OH: Oberlin College Press, 1997.

Wright, C.D. “Poetics Statement: My American Scrawl.” Eleven More American Women Poets in the 21st Century: Poetics Across North America. Ed. Claudia Rankine & Lisa Sewell. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2012. 397-398. "Not every mistake should be erased. Nor shall the unintelligible be left out" (397).

Wright, Charles. Untitled essay on a poem. Fifty Contemporary Poets: The Creative Process. Ed. Alberta T. Turner. New York: David McKay Co., 1977.

---. Untitled essay on an Ars Poetica. What Will Suffice: Contemporary American Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Christopher Buckley and Christopher Merrill. Salt Lake City: Gibbs Smith, 1997.

---. “Charles Wright at Oberlin.” A Field Guide to Contemporary Poetry and Poetics. Revised Edition. Ed. Stuart Friebert, David Walker, and David Young. Oberlin, OH: Oberlin College Press, 1997.

Wright, James. “Letters from Europe, Two Notes from Venice…” American Poets in 1976. Ed. William Heyen. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1976.

---. “A Response to ‘The Working Line.’” A Field Guide to Contemporary Poetry and Poetics. Revised Edition. Ed. Stuart Friebert, David Walker, and David Young. Oberlin, OH: Oberlin College Press, 1997.

Xiaojing, Zhou. “Introduction.” The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. Ed. Claudia Rankine, Beth Loffreda, & Max King Cap. Albany, NY: Fence Books, 2015. 106-113.

Xu, Lynn. Untitled Poetics Statement. The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. 347. "Today it is still not clear what the poem wants" (347).

Yakich, Mark. “Yakking Points.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.

Yau, John. Untitled Essay on a poem. Ecstatic Occasions, Expedient Forms: 85 Leading Contemporary Poets Select and Comment on Their Poems. Ed. David Lehman. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2001.

---. “Between the Forest and Its Trees (Second Version).” A Poetics of Criticism. Edited by Juliana Spahr, Mark Wallace, Kristin Prevallet, and Pam Rehm. Buffalo: Leave Books, 1994. 43-48. "The rules of effective communication are not the rules of poetry. What is the poem's theme? What is its subject? Buy this little guidebook full of the right things to say and reflect upon and you will write great poetry and be an effective communicator of major themes" (43).

Yeats, W. B. “The Symbolism of Poetry.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

---. “The First Principle.” The McGraw Hill Book of Poetry. Edited by Robert DiYanni and Kraft Rompf. New York: McGraw Hill, 1993.

---. “A General Introduction for My Work.” Modern Poets on Modern Poetry. Ed. James Scully. London: McGraw Hill, 1966.

---. “Anima Hominis (excerpt).” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

---. “from Magic.” 20th Century Poetry & Poetics. Fourth Edition. Ed. Gary Geddes. Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996.

---. “Art and Ideas.” Poets on Painters: Essays on the Art of Painting by Twentieth-Century Poets. Edited by J.D. McClatchy. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988. 1-10.

---. From “A Vision: The Great Wheel.” Prose Keys to Modern Poetry. Edited by Karl Shapiro. Evanston: Row Peterson & Co., 1962. 121-136.

---. Untitled Excerpt on Writing. Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Edited by Christina Davis & Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. 109.

Yépez, Heriberto and Myung Mi Kim, C.S. Giscombe, and Sherwin Bitsui. "Moving Across Languages, Borders, and Cultures." Cross Worlds: Transcultural Poetics: An Anthology. Ed. Anne Waldman & Laura Wright. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2014. 258-267.

---. “The Dialectic of Romantic and Postromantic Ethopoetics (after Certain Hispano-American Visual Poetries.” Translated by Jen Hofer. Active Romanticism: The Radical Impulse in Nineteenth-Century and Contemporary Poetic Practice. Ed. Julie Carr and Jeffrey C. Robinson. Tuscaloosa, AL: University of Alabama Press, 2015. 197-211.

Yetsirah, Sefer. “Anonymous.” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 341-344.

Yingling, Thomas. “The hom*osexual Lyric.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

Young, David. Untitled essay on a poem. Fifty Contemporary Poets: The Creative Process. Ed. Alberta T. Turner. New York: David McKay Co., 1977.

---. “The Bite of the Muskrat: Judging Contemporary Poetry.” A Field Guide to Contemporary Poetry and Poetics. Revised Edition. Ed. Stuart Friebert, David Walker, and David Young. Oberlin, OH: Oberlin College Press, 1997.

---. “Language: The Poet as Master and Servant.” A Field Guide to Contemporary Poetry and Poetics. Revised Edition. Ed. Stuart Friebert, David Walker, and David Young. Oberlin, OH: Oberlin College Press, 1997.

---. “Second Honeymoon: Some Thoughts on Translation.” A Field Guide to Contemporary Poetry and Poetics. Revised Edition. Ed. Stuart Friebert, David Walker, and David Young. Oberlin, OH: Oberlin College Press, 1997.

Young, Karl. “Bookforms.” The Book, Spiritual Instrument. Edited by Jerome Rothenburg and David Guss. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 52-58.

---. “Notation and the Art of Reading.” A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 25-49.

---. “Notes on Codex Vienna.” The Book, Spiritual Instrument. Edited by Jerome Rothenburg and David Guss. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 108-123.

Young, Kevin. “Poetics Statement.” American Poets in the 21st Century: The New Poetics. Edited by Claudia Rankine and Lisa Sewell. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2007.

Young, Stephanie. “Thinking, Practice.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.

Yu, Timothy. “Making the Case for Asian American Poetry.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.

---. "You're Note Avant-Garde, Are You?" The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 340-343.

Yuknavitch, Lidia. "Why Do you Write it All Weird?" The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 344-345.

Zack, Lev. “overture.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Zapruder, Matthew. “Don’t Paraphrase.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.

Zawacki, Andrew. “Artist’s Statement.” The Iowa Anthology of New American Poetries. Ed. by Reginald Shepherd. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2004.

---. “Learned Ignorance.” Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.

---. "Encounter." The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. 346-360.

Zdanevich, Ilya and Mikhail Larionov. “Why We Paint Ourselves: A Futurist Manifesto.” Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001.

Zimmer, Paul. “The Importance of Being Zimmer.” American Poets in 1976. Ed. William Heyen. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1976.

Zoline, Pamela. “Council on Counterpoetics” (with 10 others). Poems for the Millennium: The University of California Book of Modern & Postmodern Poetry. Volume Two: From Postwar to Millennium. Ed. Jerome Rothenberg and Pierre Joris. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998.

Zorn, John. “Memory and Immortality in Musical Composition.” A Guide to Poetics Journal: Writing in the Expanded Field 1982-1998. Ed. Lyn Hejinian & Barrett Watten. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2013. 414-419. "I ask myself why I do what I do. I try to spark thinking patterns, to raise questions. One question that persistently comes up pertains to diversity and simultaneity. I am not asking how it is that so many different elements can exist at any one time and place. But I do insist on asking why everything is continually put into convenient boxes" (418).

Zucker, Rachel. “Artist’s Statement.” The Iowa Anthology of New American Poetries. Ed. by Reginald Shepherd. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2004.

---. “Exempt, Implicated.” The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. Ed. Claudia Rankine, Beth Loffreda, & Max King Cap. Albany, NY: Fence Books, 2015. 170-184.

Zukofsky, Louis. “An Objective.” Twentieth-Century American Poetics: Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Dana Gioia, David Mason, and Meg Scho*rke. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2004.

---. “A Statement for Poetry.” Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

***

Poetics Collections by Individual Poets

Alteri, Charles. The Art of Twentieth-Century American Poetry: Modernism and After. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2006.

Amato, Joe. Industrial Poetics: Demo Tracks for a Mobile Culture. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2006.

Armantrout, Rae. Collected Prose. Philadelphia: Singing Horse Press, 2007.

Ashbery, John. Selected Prose. Ed. Eugene Richie. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2004.

---. Other Traditions. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2001.

Auden, W.H. The Prolific and the Devourer. Hopewell, NJ: Ecco Press, 1981.

Beachy-Quick, Dan. A Whaler’s Dictionary. Minneapolis: Milkweed Editions, 2008.

---. Wonderful Investigations: Essays, Meditations, Tales. Minneapolis: Milkweed Editions, 2012

Bernstein, Charles. A Poetics. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1992.

---. Attack of the Difficult Poems: Essays and Interventions. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2011.

---. My Way: Speeches and Poems. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1999.

Blaser, Robin. The Fire: Collected Essays of Robin Blaser. Ed. Miriam Nichols. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2006.

Celan, Paul. Collected Prose. Tr. Rosmarie Waldrop. Manchester: Carcanet, 2003.

Clover, Joshua. 1989: Bob Dylan Didn’t Have This to Sing About. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2009.

---. The Matrix. London: BFI, 2004.

Cole, Norma. To Be At Music: Essays & Talks. Richmond, CA: Omnidawn Publishing, 2010.

Corbett, William. All Prose. Cambridge: Zoland Books, 2001.

Creeley, Robert. Collected Prose. Champaign: Dalkey Archive, 2001.

Culler, Jonathan. Structuralist Poetics. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1975.

Davenport, Guy. The Hunter Gracchus and Other Papers on Literature & Art. New York: Counterpoint, 1996.

Doty, Mark. The Art of Description: World into Word. Minneapolis: Graywolf Press, 2010.

Duncan, Robert. A Selected Prose. Ed. Robert J. Bertholf. New York: New Directions, 1995.

Finkelstein, Norman. Lyrical Interference: Essays on Poetics. New York: Spuyten Duyvil, 2003.

Fraser, Kathleen. Translating the Unspeakable: Poetry and the Innovative Necessity. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2000

Gilbert, Alan. Another Future: Poetry and Art in a Postmodern Twilight. Wesleyan University Press, 2006.

Ginsberg, Allen. Deliberate Prose. New York: Penguin, 2000.

Gioia, Dana. Can Poetry Matter? Essays on Poetry and American Culture. Minneapolis: Graywolf, 1992.

Goldsmith, Kenneth. Uncreative Writing: Managing Language in the Digital Age. New York: Columbia University Press, 2011.

Grossman, Allen and Mark Halliday. The Sighted Singer: Two Works on Poetry for Readers and Writers. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1992.

Hass, Robert. Twentieth Century Pleasures: Prose on Poetry. New York: Ecco, 1984.

---. What Light Can Do: Essays on Art, Imagination, and the Natural World. New York: Ecco, 2012.

Hejinian, Lyn. The Language of Inquiry. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2000.

Hoagland, Tony. Real Sofistikashun: Essays on Poetry and Craft. Minneapolis: Graywolf Press, 2006.

Hollander, John. Melodious Guile: Fictive Pattern in Poetic Language. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1988.

Howe, Fanny. The Wedding Dress: Meditations on Word and Life. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2003.

---. The Winter Sun: Notes on a Vocation. Minneapolis: Graywolf Press, 2009.

Howe, Susan. The Birth-mark: unsettling the wilderness in American literary history. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 1993.

---. My Emily Dickinson. Berkeley: North Atlantic Books, 1985.

Jarrell, Randall. No Other Book: Selected Essays. Ed. Brad Leithauser. New York: Perrenial, 2000.

Johnston, Devin. Creaturely and Other Essays. New York: Turtle Point, 2009.

Longenbach, James. The Art of the Poetic Line. Minneapolis: Graywolf Press, 2007.

Joris, Pierre. A Nomadic Poetics: Essays. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2003.

Joron, Andrew. The Cry at Zero: Selected Prose. Denver: Counterpath, 2007.

Koch, Kenneth. The Art of Poetry: Poems, Parodies, Interviews, Essays, and Other Work. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1996.

Komunyakaa, Yusef. Blue Notes: Essays, Interviews, and Commentaries. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2003.

Mackey, Nathaniel. Discrepant Engagement: Dissonance, Cross-Culturality, and Experimental Writing. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1993.

---. Paracritical Hinge: Essays, Talks, Notes, Interviews. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 2005.

Miller, Jane. Working Time: Essays on Poetry, Culture, and Travel. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1992.

Moten, Fred. In the Break: The Aesthetics of the Black Radical Tradition. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, 2003.

Myles, Eileen. The Importance of Being Iceland: Travel Essays in Art. Los Angeles: Semiotext(e), 2009.

Nelson, Maggie. Bluets. Seattle: Wave Books, 2009.

---. Women, The New York School, and Other True Abstractions. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2007.

---. The Art of Cruelty: A Reckoning. New York: W. W. Norton, 2011.

Nealon, Christopher. The Matter of Capital: Poetry and Crisis in the American Century. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2011.

---. Foundlings: Lesbian and Gay Historical Emotion Before Stonewall. Chapel Hill, NC: Duke University Press, 2001.

Notley, Alice. Coming After: Essays on Poetry. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2005.

Olson, Charles. Collected Prose. Ed. Donald Allen and Benjamin Friedlander. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1997.

Oppen, George. Selected Prose, Daybooks, and Papers. Ed. Stephen Cope. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2007.

Padgett, Ron. The Teachers and Writers Handbook of Poetic Forms. New York: Teachers & Writers Collaborative, 1987.

Perloff, Marjorie. The Poetics of Indeterminacy: Rimbaud to Cage. Evanston: Northwestern University Press, 1981. [Essays on Rimbaud, Stein, Williams, Pound, Beckett, Ashbery, Cage, and Antin]

---. The Futurist Moment: Avant-Garde, Avant Guerre, and the Langugage of Rupture. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2003. [originally 1986]

---. 21st-Century Modernism: The “New” Poetics. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2002. [Essays on Eliot, Stein, Duchamp, Khlebnikov]

---. The Dance of the Intellect: Studies in the Poetry of the Pound Tradition. Evanston: Northwestern University Press, 1985. [Essays on Pound, Stevens, Cage, Joyce, Williams, Oppen, Beckett, Cage, Language poetry, etc.]

---. Differentials: Poetry, Poetics, Pedagogy. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2004. [Essays on Humanities, Eliot, Pound, Duchamp, Wittgenstein, Jolas, Beckett, Silliman, Susan Howe, de Campos, Ronald Johnson, Bok, Bergvall, Raworth, Armantrout]

---. Poetic License: Essays on Modernist and Postmodernist Lyric. Evanston: Northwestern University Press, 1990. [Essays on Canonicity, Feminist poetics, Yeats, Khlebnikov, Lawrence, Pound, Stein, Beckett, Plath, Ginsberg, Merwin, Blackburn, Barthes, Ashbery, McCaffery, Susan Howe]

---. Poetry On & Off the Page: Essays for Emergent Occasions. Evanston: Northwestern University Press, 1998. [Essays on Loy, Duncan-Levertov, Hejinian, Barthes, Boltanski, McCaffery, Cage, Viola.]

---. Radical Artifice: Writing Poetry in the Age of Media. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1991.

--- and Craig Dworkin, Eds. The Sound of Poetry / The Poetry of Sound. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2009. [Essays by Roubaud, Susan Stewart, Lehto, Huang, Rosmarie Waldrop, Sieburth, Crnkovic, Nancy Perloff, McCaffery, Bok, Bernstein, Aji, Dworkin, Tawada, Susan Howe, Ruben Gallo, Bessa, Drucker, Ma, Reed, Goldsmith]

Palmer, Michael. Active Boundaries: Selected Essays and Talks. New York: New Directions, 2008.

Place, Vanessa and Rob Fitterman. Notes on Conceptualisms. Brooklyn: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2009.

Pound, Ezra. The Spirit of Romance. New York: New Directions, 1968.

---. ABC of Reading. New York: New Directions, 1934.

Rasula, Jed. This Compost: Ecological Imperatives in American Poetry. Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press, 2012.

Retallack, Joan. The Poethical Wager. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2003.

Revell, Donald. The Art of Attention: The Poet’s Eye. Minneapolis: Graywolf Press, 2007

Rich, Adrienne. What Is Found There: Notebooks on Poetry and Politics. New York: W. W. Norton, 1993.

---. Arts of the Possible: Essays and Conversations. New York: W. W. Norton, 2001.

---. On Lies, Secrets, and Silence: Selected Prose 1966-1978. New York: W. W. Norton, 1979.

---. Blood, Bread, and Poetry: Selected Prose 1979-1985. New York: W. W. Norton, 1986.

Robertson, Lisa. Nilling: Prose Essays on Noise, p*rnography, The Codex, Melancholy, Lucretius, Folds, Cities and Related Aporias. Toronto: Bookthug, 2012.

Roethke, Theodore. On Poetry & Craft. Port Townsend, WA: Copper Canyon Press, 2001.

Roubaud, Jacques. Poetry, etcetera: Cleaning House. Tr. Guy Bennett. Los Angeles: Green Integer, 2006.

Ruefle, Mary. Madness, Rack, and Honey: Collected Lectures. Seattle: Wave Books, 2012.

Rukeyser, Muriel. The Life of Poetry. Ashfield, MA: Paris Press, 1996.

Shockley, Evie. Renegade Poetics: Black Aesthetics and Formal Innovation in African American Poetry. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2011.

Silliman, Ron. The New Sentence. New York: Roof Books, 1995.

Sorrentino, Gilbert. Something Said: Essays. Champaign: Dalkey Archive, 2001.

Spahr, Juliana. Everybody’s Autonomy: Connective Reading and Collective Identity. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2001.

Spicer, Jack. The House That Jack Built: The Collected Lectures of Jack Spicer. Ed. Peter Gizzi. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 1998.

Stefans, Brian Kim. Before Starting Over: Selected Writings and Interviews 1994-2005. Cambridge: Salt Publishing, 2006.

Stevens, Wallace. The Necessary Angel: Essays on Reality and the Imagination. New York: Knopf, 1951.

Stewart, Susan. Poetry and the Fate of the Senses. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2002.

Tate, James. The Route as Briefed. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1999.

Voigt, Ellen Bryant. The Art of Syntax: Rhythm of Thought, Rhythm of Song. Minneapolis: Graywolf Press, 2009.

Waldrop, Rosmarie. Dissonance (if you are interested). Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2005.

Williams, Jonathan. Blackbird Dust: Essays, Poems, and Photographs. New York: Turtle Point, 2000.

Williams, William Carlos. The Embodiment of Knowledge. New York: New Directions, 1974.

---. In the American Grain. New York: New Directions, 2009.

Wright, C.D. Cooling Time: An American Poetry Vigil. Port Townsend: Copper Canyon, 2005.

Yau, John. The Passionate Spectator: Essays on Art and Poetry. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2006.

Young, Dean. The Art of Recklessness: Poetry as Assertive Force and Contradiction. Minneapolis: Graywolf, 2010.

Poetics Anthologies

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (1) Active Romanticism: The Radical Impulse in Nineteenth-Century and Contemporary Poetic Practice. Ed. Julie Carr and Jeffrey C. Robinson. Tuscaloosa, AL: University of Alabama Press, 2015. [Essays by Julie Carr, Jeffrey C. Robinson, Elizabeth Willis, Dan Beachy-Quick, Rachel Blau DuPlessis, Jennifer Moxley, Jerome Rothenberg, Bob Perelman, Nigel Leask, Simon Jarvis, Judith Goldman, Heriberto Yépez, Jacques Darras, & Andrew Joron]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (2) After Confession: Poetry as Autobiography. Ed. Kate Sontag and David Graham. Saint Paul: Graywolf Press, 2001. [Essays by Olds, Matthews, Aleshire, Lea, Williamson, Burchac, Collins, David Graham, Plumly, Inez, Moss, Bidart, Rankine, Finch, Komunyakaa, Sontag, Kooser, Frost, Dunn, Hudgins, Galvin, Hahn, Gemin, Gluck, Harris, Kimberly Blaeser, Muske-Dukes, Chin, Ostriker, Rich]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (3) American Poets in 1976. Ed. William Heyen. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1976. [including Bly, Brinnin, Creeley, Haines, Haislip, Heyen, Hugo, Ignatow, Logan Matthews, Mazzaro, Meredith, Oates, Pastan, Patterson, Peck, Plumly, Reed, Rich, Rosenthal, Sexton, Simpson, Smith, Stafford, St. John, Stryk, Turco, Wright, Zimmer.]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (4) Artifice & Indeterminacy: An Anthology of New Poetics. Ed. Christopher Beach. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1998. [including: Bernstein, Perelman, Davidson, Perloff, Antin, Scalapino, Hejinian, Taggart, James Sherry, Silliman, McCaffery, Lazer, Mackey, Maria Damon, Armantrout, DuPlessis, Susan Howe]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (5) Beats at Naropa. Ed. Anne Waldman and Laura Wright. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2009. [including: McClure, Coolidge, Ginsberg, Snyder, Baraka, Hettie Jones, Kyger, Janine Pommy Vega, Waldman, Joyce Johnson, Perloff, Amram, Corso, Clellon Holmes, Edie Parker Kerouac, Ted Berrigan, Ann Charters, Ferlinghetti, Whalen, Dee Cervantes, Henderson, Sanders, Oughton, Burroughs, Rick Fields, Merwin, Trungpa, Rinpche, David Rome, Joshua Zim, di Prima, Steven Taylor.]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (6) A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. Ed. Jerome Rothenberg and Steven Clay. New York: Granary Books, 2000. [Essays by Rothenberg, McCaffery, bpNichol, Karl Young, Everson, Keith S. Amith, Michael Davidson, Waldman, Derrida, Jabes, Stein, Blake, Erdman, Whitman, Susan Howe, Sieburth, Blanchot, Perloff, Cendrars, Delaunay, Marinetti, Janecek,, Khlebnikov, Maizels, Breton, Ernst, Duchamp, Beaumelle, Artaud, McGann, Nezahualcoyotl, Munn, Tedlock, Munn, Vicuña, Billeter, Barthes, Ishihara, Reinfeld, Carothers, Samarin, Meltzer, Gaffarel, Griaule, Borges, Mignolo, Phillips, Drucker, Roth, Hamilton, Knowles, Jess, Upton, Cutts, Tyson, Kaprow, Vogler, Alec Finlay, Ian Hamilton Finlay, Gillanders, Schneeman, Fahrner, Watts, Cameron, Ringgold, Cayley, Bernstein]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (7) The Book, Spiritual Instrument. Ed. Jerome Rothenberg and David Guss. New York: Granary Books, 1996. [Essays by Rothenberg, Mallarme, Gibbs, Lansing, Guss, Karl Young, Tedlock, Cohen, Rasula, Knowles, Quasha, Oldknow, Higgins, Meltzer, Karl Young, Jabes, Eluard, Scholem, Blau]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (8) A Broken Thing: Poets on the Line. Ed. Emily Rosko and Anton Vander Zee. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2011. [including Kazim Ali, Bruce Andrews, Hadara Bar-Nadav, Catherine Barnett, Charles Bernstein, Mei-mei Berssenbrugge, Bruce Bond, Marianne Boruch, Scott Cairns, Joshua Clover, Norma Cole, Brent Cunningham, J.P. Dancing Bear, Christina Davis, Johanna Drucker, Camille Dungy, John O. Espinoza, Kathy fa*gan, Annie Finch, Graham Foust, Alice Fulton, John Gallaher, Noah Eli Gordon, Arielle Greenberg, Sarah Gridley, Gabriel Gudding, Kimiko Hahn, Raza Ali Hasan, H.L. Hix, Cynthia Hogue, Fanny Howe, Christine Hume, Christine Hume, Karla Kelsey, Sarah Kennedy, Ben Lerner, Dana Levin, Timothy Liu, Thomas Lux, Joanie Mackowski, Shara McCallum, Heather McHugh, Wayne Miller, Jenny Mueller, Laura Mullen, Molly Paco*ck, V. Penelope Pelizzon, Emmy Pérez, Carl Phillips, Patrick Phillips, Donald Platt, Kevin Prufer, Paisley Rekdal, Donald Revell, Martha Rhodes, Alberto Ríos, Dana Roeser, Mary Ann Samyn, Robyn Schiff, Tim Seibles, Ravi Shankar, Evie Shockley, Eleni Sikelianos, Susan Stewart, Stephanie Strickland, Terese Svoboda, Cole Swensen, Sarah Vap, Joshua Marie Wilkinson, Robert Wrigley, Rachel Zucker]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (9) Civil Disobediences: Poetics and Politics in Action. Ed. Anne Waldman and Lisa Birman. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2004. [including: Waldman, Sonia Sanchez, Ted Berrigan, Duncan, John Oughton, Blaser, Notley, Hollo, Kai Nieminen, Ferlinghetti, Creeley, Bobbie Louise Hakins, Ondaatje, Warshall, Sanders, Ginsberg, Helen Adam, Sze, Swensen, Snyder, Grauerholz, Bye, Peter Lamborn Wilson, Kyger, Baraka, Delany, Michael du Plessis, Akilah Oliver, Myles, kari Edwards, Tejada, Lorenzo Thomas, Hunter, Guest, Douglas Oliver, Steven Taylor, Laird Hunt, Alan Gilbert, Beverly Dahlen, Sikelianos, Collom, Dickison, Joris, Mullen, Alcalay, Fawcett, Regan, Birman.]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (10) Claims for Poetry. Ed. Donald Hall. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000. [including Ammons, Bell, Berry, Bly, Carruth, Creeley, Duncan, Edson, Gallagher, Gilbert, Haines, Hall, Hass, Higgins, Hollander, Hugo, Ignatow, Justice, Kennedy, Kern, Kostelanetz, Levertov,J. Logan, Lorde, McGrath, Mac Low, Merwin, O’Hara, Ostriker, Padgett, Pinsky, Rich, Ryan, Silliman, Simic, Simpson, Snodgrass, Snyder, Stafford, Strand, Walker, Wilbur]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (11) Code of Signals: Recent Writings in Poetics. Ed. Michael Palmer. Berkeley: North Atlantic Books, 1983. [including James Clifford, Mackey, Taggart, Madeleine Burnside, Fanny Howe, Hocquard & Royet-Journoud, Charles Stein, David Levi-Strauss, Christopher Gaynor, David Shapiro & Lucio Pozzi, Bromige, Michael Davidson, Diane Ward, William Corbett, Bernadette Mayer, Clark Coolidge, Shurin, Susan Howe, Steve McCaffery, Perelman, Isaac the Blind, Michael Palmer, Gerrit Lansing, Richard Grossinger, Lori Chamberlain, Dennis Barone, Charles Bernstein, Ashbery,]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (12) The Consequence of Innovation: 21st Century Poetics. Ed. Craig Dworkin. New York: Roof Books, 2008. [Essays by Dworkin, Steven Evans, Bernstein, Rasula, Barbara Cole, Biglieri, Sianne Ngai, Goldsmith, Brian Kim Stefans, K. Silem Mohammad, Gary Sullivan, Gottlieb, James Sherry, Bergvall on Templeton, Gilbert, Clune, Perloff]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (13) Contemporary Poetics. Ed. Louis Armand. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2007. [Including: Bernstein, Perloff, Kevin Nolan, Donald F. Theall, Perelman, Critchley, D.J. Huppatz, Michel Delville & Andrew Norris, Ricardo L. Nirenberg, Keston Sutherland, Nicole Tomlinson, Julian Savage, Andrews, Augusto de Campos, Darren Tofts, Gregory L. Ulmer, J. Hillis Miller, McKenzie Wark, Alan Sondheim, Louis Armand, Steve McCaffery, Allen Fisher]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (14) Conversant Essays: Contemporary Poets on Poetry. Ed. James McCorkle. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1990. [Essays by William Logan, Crase, Taggart, Grosholz, Silliman, Anzaldua, Grahn, Eshleman, Steele, Hartman, Levertov, Umpierre, Rudman, Leithauser, Gioia, Fulton, Mackey, Bell, Corn, Schulman, Galassi, Hadas, Clampitt, Gilbert, Davidson, McDowell, St. John, McClatchy, Hacker, Jensen, Peaco*ck, McKean, Swander, Hirsch, Klepfisz, Stern, C.K. Williams, Ostriker, Rothenberg, Bernstein, Randall, Clarke, Hamill, Levis, DuPlessis, Retallack, Christensen, Lauterbach, Lehman, Heller, Warren, Wormser, Plumly]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (15) Criticism: Major Statements. Ed. Charles Kaplan & William Anderson. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1991. [Including: Plato, Aristotle, Longinus, Horace, Sir Philip Sidney, John Dryden, Alexander Pope, Samuel Johnson, William Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Shelley, Poe, Arnold, Pater, James, Tolstoy, Freud, Eliot, Woolf, Kenneth Burke, Ransom, Cleanth Brooks, Frye, Derrida, Rich, Eagleton, Jameson, Barthes, Todorov, Johnson, de Man, Fish, Showalter, Greenblatt, J. Hillis Miller, Sandra M. Gilbert and Susan Gubar, Henry Louis Gates, Jr.]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (16) Cross Worlds: Transcultural Poetics. Ed. Anne Waldman & Laura Wright. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2014. [Including: Staniforth, Allen Ginsberg, Tom Pickard, Codrescu, Peter Lamborn Wilson, Wang Ping, Hintze, Elsa Cross, Kutik, Hejinian, Dennis Tedlock, Barbara Tedlock, Cid COrman, Lorenzo Thomas, Victor Hernandez Cruz, Samuel R. Delany, Yamash*ta, Zivancevic, Eileen Myles, Alex Pate, Joris, Kapil, Akilah Oliver, Joanna Kyger, Sikelianos, Buzzeo, Soma Feldmar, Monica de la Torre, Linh Dinh, Judith Malina, Hanon Reznikov, Cecilia Vicuna, Hoa Nguyen, Meredith Quetermain, James Thomas Stevens, Heriberto Yepez, Myung Mi Kim, C.S. Giscombe, Sherwin Bitsui, Michelle Naka Pierce, Sawako Nakayasu, Margaret Randall, Alberto Ruy-Sanchez, Rhonda Dahl BUchanan, Bei Dao, Perry Link, Dolores Dorantes, Jen Hofer, Ana Bozicevic, Anselm Hollo, Daisy Zamora, Jack Collom, Harryette Mullen, & David Henderson]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (17) A Field Guide to Contemporary Poetry and Poetics. Revised Edition. Ed. Stuart Friebert, David Walker, and David Young. Oberlin, OH: Oberlin College Press, 1997. [including Stafford, Levertov, Atwood, Hall, Bly, Edson, Holub, Schmitz, McPherson, James Wright, John Haines, Shirley Kaufman, William Matthews, Simic, Marvin Bell, Gunter Eich, Jean Follain, Snyder, Levis, David Young, Alberta Turner, Walkder, David Young, C.D. Wright, David Shapiro, Kinnell, Rich, Charles Wright, Laura Jensen, Lee Upton.]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (18) The Force of What's Possible: Writers on Accessibility & the Avant-Garde Ed. Lily Hoang & Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Brooklyn, NY: Nightboat Books, 2014. [including Beachy-Quick, Blanchfield, Bolina, Borsuk, Boully, Briante, Laynie Browne, Blake Butler, Amina Cain, Caponegro, Julie Carr, Ken Chen, Jeremy M. Davies, Latasha N. Nevada Diggs, DiPietra, Ducornet, NIcolle Elizabeth, Eshleman, Brian Evenson, Göransson, Noah Eli Gordon, Rachel Eliza Griffiths, Duriel E. Harris, Carla Harryman, Yona Harvey, Hejinian, Brent Hendricks, Hofer, Harmony Holiday, Hollars, Hoover, Gregory Howard, Laird Hunt, Ifland, Jemc, Stephen Graham Jones, Joris, Kapil, Kevin Killian, Amy King, Lauterbach, Lazer, Sueyeun Juliette Lee, Juliana Leslie, Denise Leto, Stacey Levine, Timothy Liu, Robert Lopez, Sean Lovelace, Magi, Mangla, Matuk, McMorris, McSweeney, Mellis, Milks, Millet, Minor, Monson, Laura Mullen, Muslim, Myles, Nutting, Lance Olsen, Ted Pelton, Craig Santos Perez, Vanessa Place, Khadijah Queen, Wendy Rawlings, Elizabeth Robinson, Joanna Ruocca, Aurelie Sheehan, David Shields, Anis Shivani, Sigo, Sikelianos, Carmen Gimenez Smith, Ken Sparling, Stackhouse, Swensen, Brian Teare, Tejada, Thon, Tillman, Tolbert, Tomasula, Jackie Wang, Tyrone Williams, L. Lamar. Wilson, Ronaldo V. Wilson, TImothy Yu, Lidia Yuknavitch, Zawacki]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (19) Futurist Manifestos. Ed. Umbro Apollonio. Boston: Art Works, 2001. [Marinetti, Boccioni, Carra, Russolo, Balla, Severini, Pratella, Bragaglia, Corra, de Saint-Point, Marinetti, Prampolini, Soffici, Corradini, Settimelli, Sant’Elia,]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (20) A Guide to Poetics Journal: Writing in the Expanded Field 1982-1998. Ed. Lyn Hejinian and Barrett Watten. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2013. [Essays by Benson, Bernstein, Dahlen, Davies, Glück, Hejinian, Susan Howe, Lakoff, Mac Low, Shklovsky, Silliman, Watten, Acker, Andrews, Armantrout, Davidson, Drucker, Harryman, Hartley, Perelman, Kit Robinson, Nick Robinson, Scalapino, Seaton, Sonbert, Alferi, Bellamy, Dragomoschchenko, Estrin, Harryette Mullen, Pearson, Andrew Ross, Lorenzo Thomas, Reva Wolf, John Zorn]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (21) Illuminations: Great Writers on Writing. Christina Davis and Christopher Edgar. New York: T&W Books, 2003. [A paragraph or two from Achebe, Akhmatova, Alighieri, Amichai, Djuna Barnes, Bishop, Boccaccio, Borges, Calvino, Cather, Celan, Conrad, Crane, Dickinson, Duras, George Eliot, T.S. Eliot, Emerson, Faulkner, Ford, Grass, Hemingway, Henry James, June Jordan, Kafka, Keats, Marquez, Mayakovsky, Mistral, de Montaigne, Moore, Morrison, Nabokov, Neruda, O’Hara, Orwell, Pessoa, Plath, Poe, Rilke, Roethke, Sexton, Shonagon, Stevens, Szymborska, Thoreau, Tolstoy, Tsvetaeva, Welty, Wharton, Wilde, Williams, Woolf, Yeats.]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (22) The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book. Ed. Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984. [including: Eigner, Piombino, Davies, Peter Seaton, DiPalma, Silliman, Watten, Grenier, Craig Watson, Greenwald, Lally, Mac Low, Hejinian, Andrews, Bernstein, Sherry, Foreman, Rasula, Bromige, Andrew Kelly, Mayer, Rothenberg, Higgins, McCaffery, Susan Bee Laufer, Abigail Child, Ensslin, Gerald Burns, Madeleine Burnside, Benedetti, Darragh, Dewdney, Barg, Bruce Boone, Cris Cheek, Kirby Malone, Marshall Reese, Davidson, Fawcett, P. Inman, John Leo, Chris Mason, Palmer, Lorenzo Thomas, Weiner, Benson, Mottram, Lawrence Weiner, Schjeldahl, Noel, Perelman, Steve Hamilton, Lynne Dreyer, Andrew Kelly, Robert Kelly, Kit Robinson, Michael Gottlieb, Armantrout, Messerli, David Trotter, Ballerini and Milazzo, Don Byrd, Ted Pearson, Mengham, Drucker, Gottlieb, Diane Ward, Hills, Tolson, Ronald Johnson.]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (23) The Lyric Theory Reader: A Critical Anthology. Ed. Virginia Jackson and Yopie Prins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014. [with essays by Genette, Frye, Wellek, Cohen, Culler, Fish, W.R. Johnson, Lerer, Dubrow, Vendler, M.H. Abrahms, Herbert F. Tucker, I.A. Richards, Cleanth Brooks and Robert Penn Warren, Eliot, Wimsatt and Beardsley, Brower, Bakhtin, Jakobson, Riffatere, Bloom, Derrida, de Man, Barbara Johnson, Walter Benjamin, Adorno, Jameson, Milne, Gourgouris, Heidegger, Lacoue-Labarthe, Grossman, Agamben, Simon Jarvis, Perloff, Altieri, Christopher Nealon, Dworkin, Vickers, Gilbert and Gubar, Yingling, Spahr, Miner, Ramazani, Mufti, Greene, Damrosch.]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (24) A Megaphone: Some Enactments, Some Numbers, and Some Essays about the Continued Usefulness of Crotchless-pants-and-a-machine-gun Feminism. Ed. Juliana Spahr and Stephanie Young. Oakland: ChainLinks, 2011. [including Spahr, Stephanie Young, Ban, Bozicevic, Djuric, Fattal, Rapatzikou, Repar, Sakelliou, Scappettone, Schneider, Venkateswaran, Villiers, Whitener, Zemborain, Paul Foster Johnson, Brolaski, Grinnell, Peet, Dale Smith, Stallings, Reyes, CAConrad]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (25) Manifesto: A Century of Isms. Ed. Mary Ann Caws. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001. [Including Whistler, Wilde, Pierre-Louis, Mallarme, Moreas, redon, Hodler, Bryusov, Ivanov, Sologub, Yeats, Tzara, Stern and Wat, Snyder, Albert-Birot, Apollinaire, Braque, Cendrars, Jacob, Reverdy, Delaunay, Hausmann, Newman, Boccioni, Marinetti, Carra, Russolo, Ade Saint-Poit, Mandelstam, Graal-Arelsky, Zack, Burliuk, Mayakovsky, Khlebnikov and Kruchenykh, Larionov and Goncharova, Zdanevich and Larionov, Munch, Kokoschka, Klee, Ensor, Litteraire, Ensor, de Kooning, Kandinsky, Marc, Carra, de Chirico, Arp, Huelsenbeck, Janko, Doesburg, Duchamp, Picabia, Ray, Richter, Vache, Freytag-Loringhoven, Loy, Aldington, Lewis, Flint, Harltey, Pound, Dali, de la Serna, Ortega y Gasset, Torres-Garcia, Huidobro, Borges, Andrade, Hausmann, Schwitters, Lissitzky, Gabo and Pevsner, Tatli, Malevich, Moholy-Nagy, Popova, van Doesburg, Mondrian, Richter, Corbusier, Ozenfant, Artaud, Breton and Eluard, Rivera, Trotsky, Cahun, Morise, Cesaire, Matta, Senghor, Poe, Delaunay, Leger, Ponge, de Chirico, Marinetti, Volt, Fani, van Doesburg, Kandinsky, Jolas, Garnier, Picabia, de Vree, Fontana, Kiikuni, Isou, Olson, Lawrence, Hartley, Welty, Hartley, O’Hara, Whitman, Williams, DuBois, Anzaldua, Oppenheim, Cixou and Clement, Le Lionnais, Bee and Bernstein, Hejinian, Palmer, Piombino, Antheil, Boulez, Cage, Alexander, Hejduk, Jencks, Balestrini, Phillips, Roubaud, Stein, Jabes.]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (26) Modern Poetics. Ed. James Scully. New York: McGraw Hill, 1965. [including Yeats, Pound, Frost, Eliot, Williams, Hopkins, Ransom, Moore, Stevens, cummings, Crane, Auden, Thomas, Jones, Lowell.]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (27) Modern Poets on Modern Poetry. Ed. James Scully. London: McGraw Hill, 1966. [including: Yeats, Pound, Frost, Eliot, Williams, Hopkins, Ransom, Moore, cummings, Stevens, Crane, Auden, Thomas, David Jones, Lowell, Olson.]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (28) The Monkey & The Wrench: Essays into Contemporary Poetics. Ed. Mary Biddinger and John Gallaher. Akron, OH: University of Akron Press, 2011. [Including: Archambeau, Gabbert, Dumanis, Stephen Burt, Benjamin Paloff, Elizabeth Robinson, David Kirby, Arielle Greenberg, Craig Santos Perez, Michael Theune, Megan Volpert, and Mark Wallace, Cole Swensen, and Joy Katz]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (29) The Poet’s Vocation: Selections from the Letters of Hölderlin, Rimbaud and Hart Crane. Ed. William Burford and Christopher Middleton. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1967. [gorgeous, strange little book with lovely illustrations in a rare edition.]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (30) The Poet’s Work. Ed. Reginald Gibbons. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1979. [including Milosz, Pessoa, Mandelstam, Pasternak, Lorca, Cernuda, Stevens, Char, Montale, Seferis, Schwartz, Shapiro, A.D. Hope, MacDiarmid, Kunert, Berry, Machado, Valery, Crane, Thomas, Williams, Bogan, Moore, Auden, Jarrell, Duncan, Levertov, Heaney, Snyder.]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (31) Poetics: Essays on the Art of Poetry. An Anthology from Tendril Magazine Compiled by Paul Mariani and George Murphy. Ocean Bluff, MA: Tendril Magazine, 1984. [including: Bell, Breslin, Dobyns, Gallagher, Galvin, Gilbert, Hass, Holden, Kinnell, Levertov, Matthews, Mueller, Nemerov, Ostriker, Pack, Plumbly, Ryan, Simic, and Stafford.]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (32) A Poetics of Criticism. Ed. Juliana Spahr, Mark Wallace, Kristin Prevallet, Pam Rehm. Buffalo: Leave Books, 1994. [Essays by Gevirtz, Schultz, Nash, Scalapino, Yau, Giscombe, Ron Day, McGann, Tom Clark, Werner, High, Brennan, Hansen, Ducornet, Karasick, Schelling, Prevallet, Willis, Alexander, Gizzi, Daly, Burns, Levy, Nourbese-Philip, Rod Smith, Osman, Tan Lin, Wallace, Fernadez, Drucker, Robertson, Spahr, Bellamy, Derksen, Robertson, Nancy Shaw, Strang, Mayer]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (33) The Poetics of The New American Poetry. Edited by Donald Allen and Warren Tallman. New York: Grove Press, 1973. [including Whitman, Fenollosa, Pound, Lawrence, Crance, Lorca, Stein, Williams, H.D., Zukofsky, Olson, Duncan, Spicer, Blaser, Creley, Dorn, Levertov, Ginsberg, Wieners, O’Hara, Baraka, Mac Low, Snyder, McClure, Ferlighetti, Kandel, Whalen]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (34) Poetry and Cultural Studies: A Reader. Ed. Maria Damon and Ira Livingston. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2009. [Wordsworth, Adorno, Benjamin, Deleuze & Guattari, Du Bois, Easthope, Paredes, Gates, Jr., Abu-Lughod, Caton, Damon, Watten, Bruce Campbell, Tricia Rose, Robin D. G. Kelley, Kumar, Jauss, Ranciere, Kristin Ross, Harrington, Chakrabarty, Huang, DuPlessis, Sedgwick, Mowitt, Minh-ha, Lorde, Bernstein, Page Dubois, Kalaidjian, Henderson, Brathwaite, Burr, Algarin]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (35) Poetry & Pedagogy: The Challenge of the Contemporary. Ed. Joan Retallack and Juliana Spahr. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2006. [including teaching essays by: Alan Golding, Lynn Keller, Altieri, Jonathan Monroe, Roland Greene, Morris Young, Maria Damon, Bernstein, Jerome McGann & Lisa Samuels, Mark McMorris, Lytle Shaw, Lyn Hejinian, G. Matthew Jenkins, Jim Keller, Juliana Chang, Jena Osman, Hiram Maxim, Derek Owens, Charles Bernstein, Harryette Mullen, Diane Glancy, and Bob Holman.]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (36) Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-2000. Ed. Jon Cook. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004. [including Yeats, Rilke, Freud, Hulme, Marinetti, Tagore, E. Thomas, A. Lowell, Apollinaire, Pound, Tzara, Khlebnikov, Eliot, Lawrence, W.C. Williams, Fenollosa, Loy, H. Crane, L. Hughes, Mayakovsky, Richards, Graves and Riding, Epson, Burke, Eluard and Breton, Leavis, Lorca, Stein, Tsvetaeva, Benjamin, Frost, Valery, Heidegger, Stevens, Jarrell, Cesaire, Olson, Zukofsky, Barthes, Wimsatt, Lacan, Davie, Blanchot, Larkin, Adorno, Jakobson, Dorn, O’Hara, Ginsberg, Auden, Baraka, Creeley, Ashbery, B.H. Smith, Genette, de Man, Walcott, Kristeva, Enzebsberger, Forrest-Thompson, Hill, Felman, Bernstein, Milosz, Rich, Poirier, Cronin, Derrida, Yingling, Perloff, Boland, Heaney, Vendler.]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (37) Poets on Painters: Essays on the Art of Painting by Twentieth-Century Poets. Ed. J.D. McClatchy. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988. [Essays by Yeats, Pound, Williams, Moore, Lawrence, Stein, Stevens, Auden, Spender, Cummings, Bishop, Rexroth, Nemerov, Jarrell, O’Hara, Creeley, Duncan, Davenport, Ashbery, Schuyler, Tomlinson, Ted Hughes, Merrill, Howard, Strand, Hollander]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (38) Poets on Poetry. Ed. Howard Nemerov. New York: Basic Books, 1966. [including: Aiken, Moore, Eberhart, Cunningham, Belitt, Howes, Brinnin, Berryman, Gilbert, Vassar Miller, Duncan, Swenson, Wilbur, Corso, Smith, Whittemore, Weiss, Dickey, Nemerov.]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (39) Poets on Poetry. Ed. Charles Norman. New York: Free Press, 1962. [including Sidney, Ben Jonson, Dryden, Samuel Johnson, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, W.C. Bryant, Emerson, Poe, Arnold, Pound, Eliot, Allen Tate, Stevens, cummings.]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (40) Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010. [including: Gridley, Reddy, Mobilio, Sikelianos, Swensen, Burt, Carr, Liu, Dawn Lundy Martin, Goldsmith, Vokman, Peter Gizzi, Fishman, Silliman, Sandra Doller, Kunin, Lily Brown, Greenfield, Boully, Moten, Mullen, Wallace, Becker, Bar-Nadav, Tyrone Williams, Ulmer, Ramke, Doxsee, Beachey-Quick, Gander, Armantrout, Shockley, Browne, Foust, Catherine Wagner, Noah Eli Gordon, Hillman, Hofer, Streckfus, Zucker, Trigilio, Hume, Beasley, Nakayasu, Henry, Rosko, Nezhukumatathil, Ronk, Cooperman, de la Paz, Kapil, Theune, Mohammad, Steensen, Hoover, Lasky, Gallaher, Mengert, Kazim Ali, Jarnot, Sphr & Clover, McSweeney & Goransson, Stephanie Young, Rasula, Moxley, Greenberg, Brouwer, Elizabeth Robinson, Sharma, Kelsey, Osman, Zawacki, Nguyen, Sueyeun Juliette Lee, Rickel, Prevallet, York, Tracy K. Smith, Dinh, Hayes, Powell, Hayot, Limon, Ben Doller, Bolina, Johnson, Yakich, Iijima, Zapruder, Glenum, Lansana, Giscombe, Yu, Reyes, Hawley, Kristi Maxwell, Siken, Sabrina Orah Mark, Waldrep.]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (41) The Politics of Poetic Form: Poetry and Public Policy. Ed. Charles Bernstein. New York: Roof Books, 1998. [including Rothenberg, Andrews, Waldrop, Brossard, Mackey, McGann, Silliman, S. Howe, Hunt, Mac Low, Inman, Weiner, Sherry, Piombino, Bernstein.]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (42) The Prelude to Poetry: The English Poets in Defence and Praise of Their Own Art. Ed. Ernest Rhys. London: J.M. Dent, 1927. [including Chaucer, Spenser, Sidney, Campion, Daniel, Jonson, Milton, Dryden, Pope, Gray, Burns, Scott, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Byron, Keats, Landor, Browning, Arnold, Bridges.]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (43) Prose Keys to Modern Poetry. Ed. Karl Shapiro. Evanston: Row, Peterson, & Co., 1962. [essays by Poe, Baudelaire, Huysmans, Pater, Symons, Wilde, Eliot, Frazer, Weston, Hulme, Pound, Confucius, Yeats, Fenollosa, Stevens, Whitman, Miller, Rimbaud, Carroll, Hopkins, Owen, Auden, Williams, Cummings, Jeffers, Tate, Crane, Lawrence]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (44) The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. Ed. Claudia Rankine, Beth Loffreda, Max King Cap. Albany, NY: Fence Books, 205. [essays by Loffreda, Rankine, Cap, Mark Peterson, Kyungmi Shin, Simone White, Ari Banias, Casey Llewellyn, Maryam Afaq, Jennifer Chang, Jess Row, Charles Bernstein, Ronaldo V. Wilson, Arielle Greenberg, Helen Klonaris, Isaac Myers III, Tess Taylor, Zhou Xiaojing, Joshua Weiner, Farid Matuk, A. Van Jordan, Dan Beachy-Quick, James Allen Hall, Jill Magi, Rachel Zucker, Francisco Aragón, Kasey Johnson, Diane Exavier, Soraya Membreno, Lacy M. Johnson, Evie Shockley, Jericho Brown, Reginald Dwayne Betts, Ira Sadoff, Bhanu Kapil, Tracie Morris, Tamiko Beyer, Jane Lazarre, R. Erica Doyle, Sandra Lim, Hossannah Asuncion, Caitie Moore, Kristin Palm, Danielle Pafunda, Bettina Judd, & Dawn Lundy Martin]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (45) Reading the Difficulties: Dialogues with Contemporary American Innovative Poetry. Ed. Thomas Fink and Judith Halden-Sullivan. Tuscaloosa: U of Alabama P, 2014. [essays by Charles Bernstein, Elizabeth Robinson, Hank Lazer, Stephen Paul Miller, Burt Kimmelman, Kristen Gallagher, Tabios, Carrie Conners, Halden-Sullivan, Christopher Schmidt, Paolo Javier, Jessica Lewis Luck, Sheila E. Murphy]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (46) The Strangest of Theatres: Poets Writing Across Borders. Ed. Jared Hawkley, Susan Rich & Brian Turner. San Francisco: McSweeney's, 2013. [essays by Kazim Ali, Katharine Coles, Nick Flynn, Eliza Griswold, Jared Hawkley, Komunyakaa, Nye, Claudia Rankine, Susan Rich, Alyssa Valles, Ashley Brown, Carolyn Forche, Jane Hirschfield, Denise Levertov, Philip Levine, W.S. Merwin, Derek Walcott, Charles Wright, Elizabeth Austen, Derick Burleson, Gregory Dunne, Karen Finneyfrock, Kathleen Graber, Barth Greenwell, Adrie Kusserow, Sandra Meek, Aimee Nezhukukumatathill, Jacquelyn Pope, Srikanth Reddy, Emily Ruch, Donna Stonecipher,and Katharine Whitcomb]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (47) Strong Words: Modern Poets on Modern Poetry. Ed. W.N. Herbert and Matthew Hollis. Northumberland: Bloodaxe, 2000. [excerpts by Pound, Yeats, Eliot, Graves, Frost, Crance, Cummings, Stein, Stevens, Auden, MacNeice, MacDiarmid, Bunting, Williams, Zukofsky, Olson, Creeley, Levertov, Moore, Bishop, Lowell, Jarrell, Dougla, Dylan Thomas, W.S. Graham, Kavanagh, Hughes, Ginsberg, O’Hara, Baraka, Lorde, Rich, Gunn, Plath, Stevie Smith, Larkin, Ted Hughes, Heaney, Tony Harrison, Douglas Dunn, Walcott, Muldoon, Paulin, Raine, Stevenson, C.K. Williams, E. Feinstein, Morgan, Leonard, Adco*ck, Murray, Kinsella, Fanthorpe, Nicholes. Kennelly, Boland, McGuckian, O’Donoghue, Constantine, hugo Williams, Motion, Ciaran Carson, Sean O’Brien, Hofmann, Donaghy, Selima Hill, Maguire, Armitage, Maxwell, Burnside, Crawford, Lewis, D’Aguiar, Greenlaw, Jamie, Paterson, Hartley Williams.]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (48) The Structure of Verse: Modern Essays on Prosody. Ed. Harvey Gross. New York: Ecco Press, 1979. [Including essays by Graves, Fussell, Bridges, Richards, Hollander, Winters, Jespersen, Wimsatt and Beardsley, Halle and Keyser, Stevenson, Eliot, Pound, Roethke, Kunitz, Justice.]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (49) Talking Poetics from Naropa Institute: Annals of the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics. Volume One. Ed. Anne Waldman and Marilyn Webb. Boulder: Shambhala, 1978. [including: Ginsberg, Duncan, Di Prima, Ted Berrigan, Burroughs, Dorn, McClure, Padgett, Coolidge, Mac Low, Cage]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (50) Talking Poetics from Naropa Institute: Annals of the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics. Volume Two. Ed. Anne Waldman and Marilyn Webb. Boulder: Shambhala, 1978. [including: Brownstein, Whalen, Rothenberg, Waldman, Algarin, McAdams, Sanders, Ginsberg]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (51) Telling It Slant: Avant-Garde Poetics of the 1990s. Ed. Mark Wallace & Steven Marks. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2001. [With essays by Steve Evans, Lisa Robertson, Harryette Mullen, Jefferson Hansen, Gary Sullivan, Brian Kim Stefans, Daniel Barbiero, Leonard Schwartz, Kristin Prevallet, Christopher Funkhouser, Jeff Derksen, Sianne Ngai, Mark Wallace, Caroline Bergvall, Elizabeth Willis, Charles Borkhuis, Jena Osman, Bill Luoma, Benjamin Friedlander, Sherry Brennan, Tan Lin, C.S. Giscombe, Steven Marks, Andrew Levy, Rod Smith, Juliana Spahr.]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (52) Toward the Open Field: Poets on the Art of Poetry 1800-1950. Ed. Melissa Kwasny. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2004. [including Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Shelley, Emerson, Whitman, Dickinson, Hopkins, Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Mallarme, Breton, Lorca, Valery, Cesaire, Pound, Eliot, Loy, Hughes, Zukofsky, Stein, Stevens, Moore, Williams, Olson.]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (53) Twentieth Century American Poetics. Ed. Dana Gioia, David Mason, and Meg Scho*rke. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2004. [including J.W. Johnson, Frost, A. Lowell, Stein, Stevens, W.C. Williams, Pound, Jeffers, Moore, Eliot, Bogan, H. Crane, A. Tate, Winters, L. Hughes, Zukofsky, Rexroth, Olson, Cunningham, Hayden, Rukeyser, Jarrell, Stafford, Brooks, Duncan, Levertov, Simpson, Justice, Spicer, Bly, Creeley, O’Hara, Ashbery, Merwin, Hall, Rich, Espaillat, Stevenson, Simic, Foley, Pinsky, Hejinian, Gluck, Kinzie, S. G-L Lim, Silliman, Steele, Alvarez, Gioia, Logan, Dove and Nelson, Fulton, Wiman.

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (54) The Writer’s Notebook: Craft Essays from Tin House. Ed. New York: Tin House Books, 2009. [essays by mostly fiction writers and D.A. Powell, Matthea Harvey, and Marie Howe]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (55) The Writer’s Notebook II: Craft Essays from Tin House. Ed. New York: Tin House Books, 2012. [essays by mostly fiction writers and Maggie Nelson]

Poetry Anthologies with Poetics Sections

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (56) 20th Century Poetry & Poetics. Fourth Edition. Ed. Gary Geddes. Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996. [including: Atwood, Auden, Bly, Boland, Creeley, Lorna Crozier, cummings, Eliot, Frost, Ginsberg, Heaney, Ted Hughes, Levertov, Levine, Lowell, Don McKay, Daphne Marlatt, bpNichol, Olson, Plath, Pound, Al Purdy, Rich, Roethke, Snyder, Stevens, Dylan Thomas, Webb, Williams, Yeats.]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (57) American Poetry and Poetics: Poems and Critical Documents from the Puritans to Robert Frost. Edited by Daniel G. Hoffman. New York: Anchor Books, 1962. [including in “Critical Theory” section: John Cotton, Cotton Mather, Joseph Dennie, W.C. Bryant, Poe, Henry Timrod, de Tocqueville, Emerson, Whitman, Dickinson, Santayana, Frost]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (58) American Poets in the 21st Century: The New Poetics. Edited by Claudia Rankine and Lisa Sewell. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2007. [with poetics statements by Mark Levine, Karen Volkman, D.A. Powell, Peter Gizzi, Juliana Spahr, Joshua Clover, Kevin Young, Tracie Morris, Myung Mi Kim, Stacy Doris, Susan Wheeler, Mark Nowak, Kenneth Goldsmith]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (59) American Women Poets in the 21st Century. Edited by Claudia Rankine and Juliana Spahr. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2002. [with poetics by Rae Armantrout, Mei-mei Berssenbrugge, Lucie Brock-Broido, Jorie Graham, Barbara Guest, Lyn Hejinian, Brenda Hillman, Susan Howe, Ann Lauterbach, Harryette Mullen.]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (60) Ecstatic Occasions, Expedient Forms: 85 Leading Contemporary Poets Select and Comment on Their Poems. Ed. David Lehman. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2001. [including untitled short essays by Ammons, Ashbery, Bidart, Boland, Britton, Brock-Broido, Cage, Chernoff, Clampitt, Cohen Cooper, Corn, Crase, Creeley, Disch, Dolot, Dove, Flook, Fulton, Galassi, Gerstler, Gioia, Greger, Hacker, Hadas, Hammond, Hathaway, Hecht, Henry, Hine, Hirsch, Hollander, Hoover, Howard, Inez, Janowitz, Joseph, Justic, Kenney, Koethe, Komunyakaa, Lauterbach, Lehman, Leithauser, Logan, McClatchy, McHugh, Malinowitz, Mathews, Matthews, Merrill, Merwin, Mitchell, Morgan, Morice, H. Moss, Thylias Moss, H. Mullen, Charles North, Oates, Peaco*ck, Pinsky, Pollitt, Salter, Schwartz, Simic, Simpson, Spires, Stallworthy, Strand, Stull, Tate, Turco, Updike Violi, Waldrop, Warren, Welish, Welt, Wheeler, Wilbur, Wright, Yau, Yenser.]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (61) Eleven More American Women Poets in the 21st Century: Poetics Across North America. Ed. Claudia Rankine and Lisa Sewell. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2012. [including untitled poetics essays on and by Mary Jo Bang, Lucille Clifton, Kimiko Hahn, Carla Harryman, Erin Moure, Laura Mullen, Eileen Myles, M. Nourbese Philip, Joan Retallack, Lisa Robertson, C.D. Wright.]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (62) Fifty Contemporary Poets: The Creative Process. Ed. Alberta T. Turner. New York: David McKay Co., 1977. [including: Amorosi, Jon Anderson, Bell, Bendikt, Booth, Carruth, Chester, Dubie, Eberhart, Edson, Everwine, Francis, Fiebert, Gildner, Glck, Haines, Hall, James Baker Hall, Harper, Hey, Justice, Kaufman, Kennedy, Klappert, Kumin, Levertov, Lipsitz, Macdonald, McPherson, Matthews, Mazaro, Miller, Minty, Pastan, Ray, Reiss, Schmitz, Shelton, Simic, Simpson, Stafford, Stanford, Swift, Tate, Wallace, Wilbur, Willard, Woods, Charles Wright, David Young.]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (63) In the American Tree. Ed. Ron Silliman. Orono, ME: National Poetry Foundation, 1986. [section called “The Second Front” with pieces by Carla Harryman, Collab piece by Silliman, Watten, Benson, Hejinian, Bernstein, Perelman; Jackson Mac Low; Robert Grenier; Ted Greenwald; Clark Coolidge; Lyn Hejinian; Steve Benson; Lynne Dreyer; Stephen Rodefer; David Bromige; Bruce Andres; Robert Grenier; Rae Armantrout; Tina Darragh; Kit Robinson; Clark Coolidge; Susan Howe; Bernadette Mayer & Member…; Ron Silliman; Nick Pimobino; Charles Bernstein; Barrett Watten]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (64) The Iowa Anthology of New American Poetries. Ed. by Reginald Shepherd. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2004. [with “Artist’s Statements” by Dan Beachy-Quick, Jasper Bernes, Cynthia Cruz, Jocelyn Emerson, Michele Glazer, Matthea Harvey, Joan Houlihan, Christine Hume, Catherine Imbriglio, Joanna Klink, Malinda Markham, Mark McMorris, Jenny Mueller, Laura Mullen, Amy Newman, Geoffrey Nutter, Tracy Philpot, D.A. Powell, Heather Ramsdell, Karen Volkman, Lawrence L. White, Sam Witt, Andrew Zawacki, Rachel Zucker]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (65) Lyric Postmodernisms: An Anthology of Contemporary Innovative Poetries. Edited by Reginald Shepherd. Denver: Counterpath Press, 2008. [with poetics pieces by Bruce Beasley, Martine Bellen, Mei-mei Berssenbrugge, Gillian Conoley, Kathleen Fraser, Forrest Gander, C.S. Giscombe, Peter Gizzi, Brenda Hillman, Claudia Keelan, Timothy Liu, Nathaniel Mackey, Suzanne Paola, Bin Ramke, Donald Revell, Martha Ronk, Aaron Shurin, Carol Snow, Susan Stewart, Cole Swensen, Rosmarie Waldrop, Marjorie Welish, and Elizabeth Willis.]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (66) The McGraw Hill Book of Poetry. Edited by Robert DiYanni and Kraft Rompf. New York: McGraw Hill, 1993. [Appenix: Critical Comments on Poetry, including: Plato, Aristotle, Sidney, S. Johnson, Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Keats, Poe, Whitman, Dickinson, Hopkins, Yeats, Valery, Frost, Rilke, Machado, Stevens, Pound, Eliot, Lorca, Seferis, Mandelstam, cummings, Neruda, Paz, Thomas, Levertov, Berry, Strand, Lorde, Heaney, Hass, Ackerman]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (67) The New American Poetry 1945-1960. Ed. Donald Allen. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2000. [Last section is “Statements on Poetics” including pieces by Olson, Duncan, Creeley, Levertov, Ferlinghetti, Spicer, Kerouac, Ginsberg, Schuyler, O’Hara, Whalen, Snyder, McClure, Baraka, Wieners.]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (68) Poems for the Millennium: The University of California Book of Modern & Postmodern Poetry. Volume Two: From Postwar to Millennium. Ed. Jerome Rothenberg and Pierre Joris. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998. [including: Celan, Olson, Cage, Glissant, Debord, Baraka, Adrienne Rich, Parra, Maciunas, Cobbing, Chpin, McCaffery, Higgins, Roche, Edward Sanders, Beck, DuPlessis, Schneemann, Ishmael Reed, Adonis, Bhatt, Bernstein, di Prima, Rothenberg, Joris, Waldman, Zoline, Tarn, Talamantez, Rodney, Lifton, Hollo, Mary Crow.]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (69) Postmodern American Poetry: A Norton Anthology. Ed. Paul Hoover. New York: W. W. Norton, 1994. [including: Olson, Cage, Duncan, Levertov, O’Hara, Ginsberg, Creeley, Rothenberg, Baraka, Susan Howe, Coolidge, Hejinian, Mayer, Silliman, Mackey, Bruce Andrews, Cruz, Bernstein.]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (70) The Volta Book of Poets. Ed. Joshua Marie Wilkinson. San Francisco & Portland, OR: Sidebrow Books, 2015. [including: Alcalá, Baus, Anselm Berrigan, Edmund Berrigan, Briante, Sommer Browning, Julie Carr, Don Mee Choi, Arda Collins, Dot Devota, Tsering Wangmo Dhompa, Graham Foust, C.S. Giscombe, Renee Gladman, Noah Eli Gordon, Yona Harvey, Matthew Henriksen, Harmony Holiday, Cathy Park Hong, Bhanu Kapil, Jonn Keene, Aaron Kunin, Dorothea Lasky, Juliana Leslie, Rachel Levitsky, Tan Lin, Dawn Lundy Martin, J. Michael Martinez, Farid Matuk, Shane McCrae, Anna Moschovakis, Fred Moten, Sawako Nakayasu, Chris Nealon, Hoa Nguyen, Khadijah Queen, Andrea Rexilius, Brandon Shimoda, Zachary Schomburg, Evie Shockley, Cedar Sigo, Abraham Smith, Christopher Stackhouse, Mathias Svalina, Roberto Tejada, TC Tolbert, Catherine Wagner, Dana Ward, Ronaldo V. Wilson, & Lynn Xu]

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (71) What Will Suffice: Contemporary American Poets on the Art of Poetry. Ed. Christopher Buckley and Christopher Merrill. Salt Lake City: Gibbs Smith, 1997. [including poems, some with commentary afterwards. Only listed are those with commentary by the poet: Agha Shaihid Ali, Tom Andrews, Marvin Bell, Bly, Michelle Boisseau, Earl S. Braggs, Christopher Buckley, Ralph Burns, Hayden Caruth, Judith Ortiz Cofer, Mark Cox, Mary Crow, Robert Dana, Glover Davis, Fred Dings, Rita Dove, Norman Dubie, Peter Everwine, Carol Snow, James Galvin, Brewster Ghiselin, Linda Gregg, Donald Hall, Judith Hall, Sam Hamill, C.G. Hanzlicek, Hass, Herrera, Brenda Hillman. Ed. Hirsch, Hirshfield, Hongo, Hugo, Lynda Hull, T.R. Hummer, Mark Irwin, Richard Jackson, Jean Janzen, Mark Jarman, Judy Jensen, Rodney Jones, Claudia Keelan, Yusef Komunyakaa, Kumin, Lauterbach, Sydney Lea, Carol Lem, Philip Levine, Levis, Victor Martinez, William Matthews, Colleen J. McElroy, Lynne McMahon, Carol Muske, Pavlich, Lucia Maria Perillo, Revell, Rios, Rivard, Margarita Luna Robles, Pattiann Rogers, Marieve Rugo, Dixie Salazar, Dennis Saleh, Luis Omar Salinas, Santos, Nye, Simic, Soto, Stafford, Gerald Stern, David St. John, Twichell, Voigt, Wakoski, Wiegl, Wojahn, Charles Wright ]

Books on Prosody & Forms

Aptowicz, Cristin O’Keefe. Words in Your Face: A Guided Tour Through Twenty Years of the New York City Poetry Slam. New York: Soft Skull, 2008.

Atkinson, David. The English Traditional Ballad: Theory, Method, and Practice. Hants, England: Ashgate, 2002.

Attridge, Derek. Poetic Rhythm: An Introduction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006.

Auelestia, Gorka. Improvisational Poetry from the Basque Country. Reno: University of Nevada Press, 1995. [history of forms and practitioners]

Baer, William. Fourteen on Form: Conversations with Poets. Oxford, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 2009. [interviews with Richard Wilbur, Kumin, Walcott, Willis Barnstone, Hecht, Justice, Douglas Dunn, Robert Conquest, Nims, Cope, Frederick Morgan, Snodgrass, Hollander, X.J. Kennedy]

Baker, David, Ed. Meter in English: A Critical Engagement. Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1996. [Essays by Boland, Finch, Gioia, Hadas, Charles O. Hartman, Hass, Holley, Nims, Rothman, Steele, Turco, Weller, Wilbur, Woods, Robert Wallace]

--- and Ann Townsend, Eds. Radiant Lyre: Essays on Lyric Poetry. Minneapolis: Graywolf, 2007. [Essays by Baker, Richard Jackson, Plumly, Gregerson, Townsend, Carl Phillips, Pankey—several essays by each contributor on various forms: Elegy, Love Poem, Ode, Pastoral, etc.]

Block, Friedrich W., Christiane Heibach, and Karin Wenz, Eds. The Aesthetics of Digital Poetry. Germany: Hatje Cantz Verlag, 2004. [Essays in German and English by Wohlfahrt, Block, Heibach, Wenz, Glazier, Simanowski, Bootz, Berressem, Mark Bernstein, Beiguelman, Biggs, Zeitgenossen, Mark Amerkica, Seaman, Kac, Mex, Cramer, Auer, Cayley]

Bohn, Willard. The Aesthetics of Visual Poetry: 1914-1928. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1986. [Essays on Futurism, Apollinaire, Calligrams, Junoy, Salvat-Papasseit, Ultra, de Torre, de Zayas.]

Bök, Christian. Pataphysics: The Poetics of an Imaginary Science. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2002. [On Alfred Jarry’s “pseudoscience. Chapters: Science and Poetry, Title Chapter, Italian Futurism, French Oulipianism, Canadian Pataphysics.]

Bradley, Adam. Book of Rhymes: The Poetics of Hip Hop. New York: BasicCivitas, 2009. [Chapters: “Rhythm,” “Rhyme,” “Word Play,” “Style,” “Storytelling,” “Signifying.]

Bradley, Ian. The Daily Telegraph Book of Hymns. London: Continuum, 2005. [Over 150 hymns with commentary on all of them.]

Brower, Reuben A., Ed. Forms of Lyric: Selected Papers from the English Institute. New York: Columbia University Press, 1970. [7 essays including Vendler on George Herbert and de Man’s “Lyric and Modernity.”]

Caplan, David. Poetic Form: An Introduction. New York: Pearson Longman, 2007. [basic text book style anthology focusing on form]

---. Questions of Possibility: Contemporary Poetry and Poetic Form. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005. [Essays on Sestina, Ghazal, Heroic Couplet, Ballad, and “Prosody after the Poetry Wars.”]

Caws, Mary Ann and Hermine Riffaterre. The Prose Poem in France: Theory and Practice. New York: Columbia University Press, 1983. [Essays by Breunig, Shattuck, Beaujour, Todorov, Barbara Johnson, Riffaterre, Cohn, Lawler, Caws, Sonnenfeld, Deguy, Hollander.]

Corn, Alfred. The Poem’s Heartbeat: A Manuel of Prosody. Port Townsend, WA: Copper Canyon Press, 2008.

Delville, Michel. The American Prose Poem: Poetic Form and the Boundaries of Genre. Gainsville: University Press of Florida, 1998. [essays on Joyce, Stein, Sherwood Anderson, Patchen, Edson, Bly, Simic]

Drucker, Joanna. The Century of Artists’ Books. New York: Granary Books, 2004.

---. Figuring the Word: Essays on Books, Writing, and Visual Poetics. New York: Granary Books, 1998.

Fussell, Paul. Poetic Meter & Poetic Form. New York: McGraw Hill, 1979.

Gross, Harvey. Sound and Form in Modern Poetry: A Study of Prosody from Thomas Hardy to Robert Lowell. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1965.

---, Ed. The Structure of Verse: Modern Essays on Prosody. New York: Ecco Press, 1979. [Including essays by Graves, Fussell, Bridges, Richards, Hollander, Winters, Jespersen, Wimsatt and Beardsley, Halle and Keyser, Stevenson, Eliot, Pound, Roethke, Kunitz, Justice.]

Hartman, Charles O. Free Verse: An Essay on Prosody. Evanston: Northwestern University Press, 1980.

Hollander, John. Melodious Guile: Fictive Pattern in Poetic Language. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1988.

---. Rhyme’s Reason: A Guide to English Verse. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2001.

Kennedy, David. Elegy. New York: Routledge, 2007.

Kotz, Liz. Words To Be Looked At: Language in 1960s Art. Cambridge: MIT Press, 2007.

McDowell, Gary L. and F. Daniel Rzicznek. The Rose Metal Press Field Guide to Prose Poetry: Contemporary Poets in Discussion and Practice. Brookline, MA: Rose Metal Press, 2010. [Essays by Hico*ck, Duhamel, Byrd, Skinner, Robins, Keplinger, Goldberg, Greenberg, Wallace, Olsen, Lazar, Gonzalez, Seaton, Chernoff, and many others]

Oliver, Mary. A Poetry Handbook. New York: Mariner Books, 1994.

---. Rules for the Dance: A Handbook for Writing and Reading Metrical Verse. New York: Mariner Books, 1998.

Padgett, Ron. The Teachers and Writers Handbook of Poetic Forms. New York: Teachers & Writers Collaborative, 1987.

Pinsky, Robert. The Sounds of Poetry: A Brief Guide. New York: FSG, 1999.

Santilli, N. Such Rare Citings: The Prose Poem in English Literature. Madison: Farleigh Dickinson University Press, 2002. [Essays on De Quincey, Baudelaire, Blake, Wilde, Beckett, etc.]

Shaw, Robert B. Blank Verse: A Guide to Its History and Use. Athens, OH: Ohio University Press, 2007.

Smith, Barbara Herrnstein. Poetic Closure: A Study of How Poems End. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1968.

Strand, Mark and Eavan Boland. The Making of a Poem: A Norton Anthology of Poetic Forms. New York: W.W. Norton, 2000.

Thompson, John. The Founding of English Metre. London: Routledge, 1966.

Turco, Lewis. The New Book of Forms: A Handbook of Poetics. Hanover: University Press of New England, 1986.

Vendler, Helen. The Art of Shakespeare’s Sonnets. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1987. [extended commentary on every single sonnet]

General Reference Books on Poetry & Poetics

Bloom, Harold. The Art of Reading Poetry. New York: Harper, 2004.

Burt, Stephen. Close Calls with Nonsense: Reading New Poetry. Minneapolis: Graywolf Press, 2009.

Eagleton, Terry. How to Read a Poem. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2007.

Fussell, Paul. Poetic Meter & Poetic Form. New York: McGraw Hill, 1979.

Hirsch, Edward. A Poet’s Glossary. New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2014.

Kinzie, Mary. A Poet’s Guide to Poetry. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1999.

Orr, David. Beautiful and Pointless: A Guide to Modern Poetry. New York: Harper 2012.

Greene, Roland, et al. The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics: Fourth Edition. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2012.

Padgett, Ron. The Teachers and Writers Handbook of Poetic Forms. New York: Teachers & Writers Collaborative, 1987.

Turco, Lewis. The New Book of Forms: A Handbook of Poetics. Hanover: University Press of New England, 1986.

Special Issues of Journals on Poetics

Antaeus. Poetry & Poetics. Summer / Autumn, 1978. Vol. 30/31. Including “Essays” and “Documents” sections, with entries by: Kunitz, Fussell, Miller Williams, Justice, Plumly, Hass, Strand, Simic, Bloom, Montale, W.C. Williams, Grace Schulman, Philip Levine]

Interviews with Poets in Print

Adam, Helen. Interview. The Poet’s Craft: Interviews from the New York Quarterly. New York: Paragon House, 1987. 262-269.

Ai. Interview by Lawrence Kearney and Michael Cuddihy. American Poetry Observed: Poets on Their Work. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1984. 1-8.

Aiken, Conrad. Interview. Poets at Work: The Paris Review Interviews. Ed. George Plimpton. New York: Penguin Books, 1989.

Alexander, Margaret Walker and Joanne V. Gabbin. Conversation. The Furious Flowering of African American Poetry. Ed. Joanne V. Gabbin. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1999.

Alcalay, Ammiel. “Interview.” by Marlowe Fawcett. Civil Disobediences: Poetics and Politics in Action. Ed. Anne Waldman and Lisa Birman. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2004.

Ali, Agha Shahid. Interview. The Verse Book of Interviews: 27 Poets on Language, Craft & Culture. Ed. Brian Henry and Andrew Zawacki. Amherst, MA: Verse Press, 2005.

Ammons, A.R. “Event: Corrective: Cure.” Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Edited by Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. 32-38.

Anzaldúa, Gloria Evangelina. Interview. Innovative Women Poets: An Anthology of Contemporary Poetry and Interviews. Ed. Elizabeth A. Frost and Cynthia Hogue. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2006.

Armantrout, Rae. Interview. What Is Poetry: Conversations with the American Avant-Garde. Ed. Daniel Kane. New York: Teachers & Writers Books, 2003.

---. Conversation with Jon Woodward. 12x12: Conversations in 21st Century Poetry & Poetics. Ed. Christina Mengert and Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2009.

Armitage, Simon. “Re-Writing the Good Book.” Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Edited by Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. 252-255.

Arteaga, Alfred and Hajera Ghori. Letters. Letters to Poets: Conversations about Poetics, Politics, and Community. Ed. Jennifer Firestone and Dana Teen Lomax. Philadelphia: Saturnalia Books, 2008.

Ashbery, John. Interview. What Is Poetry: Conversations with the American Avant-Garde. Ed. Daniel Kane. New York: Teachers & Writers Books, 2003.

---. Interview. Poets at Work: The Paris Review Interviews. Ed. George Plimpton. New York: Penguin Books, 1989.

---. Craft Interview. The Craft of Poetry: Interviews from the New York Quarterly. Ed. William Packard. New York: Doubleday, 1974.

---. An Interview in Warsaw. Code of Signals: Recent Writings in Poetics. Ed. Michael Palmer. Berkeley: North Atlantic Books, 1983.

---. Interview by Sue Gangel. American Poetry Observed: Poets on Their Work. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1984. 9-20.

---. “The Imminence of a Revelation.” Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Edited by Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. 69-76.

Atwood, Margaret. “Conversations.” 20th Century Poetry & Poetics. Fourth Edition. Ed. Gary Geddes. Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996. 784-785. “All I can say is that sometimes the lines get longer, and sometimes they get shorter. Too rigid a theory results in silence.” (785).

Auden, W.H. Interview. Poets at Work: The Paris Review Interviews. Ed. George Plimpton. New York: Penguin Books, 1989.

---. Craft Interview. The Craft of Poetry: Interviews from the New York Quarterly. Ed. William Packard. New York: Doubleday, 1974.

Auster, Paul and Michelle Robinson. 12x12: Conversations in 21st Century Poetry & Poetics. Ed. Christina Mengert and Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2009.

Baraka, Amiri and Askia Touré. Conversation. The Furious Flowering of African American Poetry. Ed. Joanne V. Gabbin. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1999.

---. Interview. The Poet’s Craft: Interviews from the New York Quarterly. New York: Paragon House, 1987. 305-317.

Barker, George. Interview by Cyrena N. Pondrom. The Contemporary Writer: Interviews with Sixteen Novelists and Poets. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1972. 253-279.

Barnstone, Willis. Interview. Fourteen on Form: Conversations with Poets. Baer, William. Oxford, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 2004. 54-64.

Barth, John. Interview by John C. Enck. The Contemporary Writer: Interviews with Sixteen Novelists and Poets. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1972. 18-29.

Baus, Eric. Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Beachy-Quick, Dan.Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Bell, Marvin. “Distilled from Thin Air.” Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Edited by Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. 61-68.

---. Interview by Lawrence Smith. American Poetry Observed: Poets on Their Work. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1984. 21-33.

---. Interview. Finding the Words: Conversations with Writers Who Teach. Edited by Nancy Bunge. Athens, OH: Swallow Press, 1985. 1-17.

Benedikt, Michael. Interview by Naomi Shihab. American Poetry Observed: Poets on Their Work. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1984. 34-47.

Berkson, Bill and Bernadette Mayer. What’s Your Idea of a Good Time? NP: Tuumba Press, 2006.

Berrigan, Anselm (with Marcella Durand). Interview. The Verse Book of Interviews: 27 Poets on Language, Craft & Culture. Ed. Brian Henry and Andrew Zawacki. Amherst, MA: Verse Press, 2005.

Berssenbrugge, Mei-mei. Interview. Innovative Women Poets: An Anthology of Contemporary Poetry and Interviews. Ed. Elizabeth A. Frost and Cynthia Hogue. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2006.

Bidart, Frank. Conversation with Pearl London (1994). Poetry In Person: Twenty-five Years of Conversations with America’s Poets. Ed. Alexander Neubauer. New York: Knopf, 2010.

Bishop, Elizabeth. Interview. Poets at Work: The Paris Review Interviews. Ed. George Plimpton. New York: Penguin Books, 1989.

---. Interview by George Starbuck. American Poetry Observed: Poets on Their Work. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1984. 48-62.

Blackburn, Paul. Craft Interview. The Craft of Poetry: Interviews from the New York Quarterly. Ed. William Packard. New York: Doubleday, 1974.

---. Interview. The Sullen Art: Interviews by David Ossman with Modern American Poets. New York: Corinth Books, 1963. 22-26.

Bly, Robert. Interview. The Sullen Art: Interviews by David Ossman with Modern American Poets. New York: Corinth Books, 1963. 39-42.

---. Interview. Towards a New American Poetics: Essays & Interviews. Edited by Ekbert Faas. Santa Barbara: Black Sparrow Press, 1979. 203-221.

---. Interview by Kevin Power. American Poetry Observed: Poets on Their Work. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1984. 63-77.

---. Interview. Towards a New American Poetics: Essays & Interviews. Edited by Ekbert Faas. Santa Barbara: Black Sparrow Press, 1979. 203-221.

Booth, Philip. “Lives We Keep Wanting to Know.” Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Edited by Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. 84-92.

Borges, Jorge Luis. Interview. Tongues of Fallen Angels. Edited by Selden Rodman. New York: New Directions, 1974. 5-37.

---. Interview L.S. Dembo. The Contemporary Writer: Interviews with Sixteen Novelists and Poets. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1972. 113-121.

Borsuk, Amaranth.Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Braz-Valentine, Claire and Dana Teen Lomax. Letters. Letters to Poets: Conversations about Poetics, Politics, and Community. Ed. Jennifer Firestone and Dana Teen Lomax. Philadelphia: Saturnalia Books, 2008.

Bronk, William. “Conversations with William Bronk.” Postmodern Poetry: The Talisman Interviews. Edited by Edward Foster. Hoboken: Talisman House, 1994. 1-19.

Brooks, Gwendolyn and B. Denise Hawkins. Conversation. The Furious Flowering of African American Poetry. Ed. Joanne V. Gabbin. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1999.

---. Interview by George Stavros. The Contemporary Writer: Interviews with Sixteen Novelists and Poets. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1972. 233-252.

Brossard, Nicole. "Put Fire on this Crazy World." Cross Worlds: Transcultural Poetics: An Anthology. Ed. Anne Waldman & Laura Wright. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2014. 185-206.

Brown, Brandon. Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Bukowski, Charles. Interview. The Poet’s Craft: Interviews from the New York Quarterly. New York: Paragon House, 1987. 318-323.

Burnside, John. “Strong Words.” Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Edited by Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. 259-261.

Burroughs, William S. “You Can’t Win.” Interview by John Oughton and Anne Waldman. Beats at Naropa. Ed. Anne Waldman and Laura Wright. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2009.

Carr, Julie.Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Carroll, Paul. Interview. The Sullen Art: Interviews by David Ossman with Modern American Poets. New York: Corinth Books, 1963. 17-21.

Carruth, Hayden. Interview. The Verse Book of Interviews: 27 Poets on Language, Craft & Culture. Ed. Brian Henry and Andrew Zawacki. Amherst, MA: Verse Press, 2005.

Carson, Ciaran. “The Other.” Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Edited by Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. 234-235.

Chapel, Fred. “On the Margins of Dreams.” Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Edited by Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. 153-157.

Cherry, Kelly. Interview. Finding the Words: Conversations with Writers Who Teach. Edited by Nancy Bunge. Athens, OH: Swallow Press, 1985. 18-35.

Christle, Heather. Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Clampitt, Amy. Conversation with Pearl London (1983). Poetry In Person: Twenty-five Years of Conversations with America’s Poets. Ed. Alexander Neubauer. New York: Knopf, 2010.

Clifton, Lucille. Conversation with Pearl London (1983). Poetry In Person: Twenty-five Years of Conversations with America’s Poets. Ed. Alexander Neubauer. New York: Knopf, 2010.

Coleman, Wanda and Truong Tran. Letters. Letters to Poets: Conversations about Poetics, Politics, and Community. Ed. Jennifer Firestone and Dana Teen Lomax. Philadelphia: Saturnalia Books, 2008.

Compton, Shanna. Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Connellan, Leo. Interview. The Poet’s Craft: Interviews from the New York Quarterly. New York: Paragon House, 1987. 324-335.

Conquest, Robert. Interview. Fourteen on Form: Conversations with Poets. Baer, William. Oxford, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 2004. 120-136.

Constantine, David. “Common and Peculiar.” Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Edited by Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. 226-228.

Coolidge, Clark. Conversation with Edward Foster. Poetry and Poetics in a New Millennium. Ed. Edward Foster. Jersey City, NJ: Talisman House, 2000.

---. “A constant retrogression, and this is not memory.” Talking Poetry: Conversations in the Workshop with Contemporary Poets. Ed. Lee Bartlett. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1987.

---. Interview. Postmodern Poetry: The Talisman Interviews. Edited by Edward Foster. Hoboken: Talisman House, 1994. 20-40.

Cope, Wendy. Interview. Fourteen on Form: Conversations with Poets. Baer, William. Oxford, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 2004. 153-171.

Cortez, Jayne. Interview. Innovative Women Poets: An Anthology of Contemporary Poetry and Interviews. Ed. Elizabeth A. Frost and Cynthia Hogue. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2006.

--- and Rosamond S. King. Letters. Letters to Poets: Conversations about Poetics, Politics, and Community. Ed. Jennifer Firestone and Dana Teen Lomax. Philadelphia: Saturnalia Books, 2008.

Craig, Joel. Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Crawford, Robert. “Cosmopolibackofbeyondism.” Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Edited by Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. 262-264.

Creeley, Robert. Interview. What Is Poetry: Conversations with the American Avant-Garde. Ed. Daniel Kane. New York: Teachers & Writers Books, 2003.

---. Interview with Linda Wagner. The Poetics of The New American Poetry. Edited by Donald Allen and Warren Tallman. New York: Grove Press, 1973.

---. Craft Interview. The Craft of Poetry: Interviews from the New York Quarterly. Ed. William Packard. New York: Doubleday, 1974.

---. Interview. The Sullen Art: Interviews by David Ossman with Modern American Poets. New York: Corinth Books, 1963. 56-64.

---. Interview. Towards a New American Poetics: Essays & Interviews. Edited by Ekbert Faas. Santa Barbara: Black Sparrow Press, 1979. 165-198.

---. “Projecting the Literal World.” Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Edited by Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. 164-171.

Cruz, Victor Hernández and Brenda Coultas. Letters. Letters to Poets: Conversations about Poetics, Politics, and Community. Ed. Jennifer Firestone and Dana Teen Lomax. Philadelphia: Saturnalia Books, 2008.

D’Aguiar, Fred. “Further Adventures in the Skin Trade.” Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Edited by Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. 270-273.

Debeljak, Ales. Interview. The Verse Book of Interviews: 27 Poets on Language, Craft & Culture. Ed. Brian Henry and Andrew Zawacki. Amherst, MA: Verse Press, 2005.

De Moraes, Vinicius. Interview. Tongues of Fallen Angels. Edited by Selden Rodman. New York: New Directions, 1974. 201-217.

Dickey, James. Interview. Poets at Work: The Paris Review Interviews. Ed. George Plimpton. New York: Penguin Books, 1989.

---. Craft Interview. The Craft of Poetry: Interviews from the New York Quarterly. Ed. William Packard. New York: Doubleday, 1974.

---. Interview by William Heyen and Peter Merchant. American Poetry Observed: Poets on Their Work. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1984. 78-87.

Donaghy, Michael. “My Report Card.” Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Edited by Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. 243-244.

Donovan, Thom. Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Dorn, Edward. Interview. The Verse Book of Interviews: 27 Poets on Language, Craft & Culture. Ed. Brian Henry and Andrew Zawacki. Amherst, MA: Verse Press, 2005.

---. Interview. The Sullen Art: Interviews by David Ossman with Modern American Poets. New York: Corinth Books, 1963. 82-86.

Duncan, Harry. Interview with Robert Dana on publishing. Against the Grain: Interviews with Maverick American Publishers. Ed. Robert Dana. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 1986.

Duncan, Robert. Interview. Towards a New American Poetics: Essays & Interviews. Edited by Ekbert Faas. Santa Barbara: Black Sparrow Press, 1979. 55-85.

Dunn, Douglas. Interview. Fourteen on Form: Conversations with Poets. Baer, William. Oxford, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 2004. 101-119.

Duplessis, Rachel Blau. Interview. Innovative Women Poets: An Anthology of Contemporary Poetry and Interviews. Ed. Elizabeth A. Frost and Cynthia Hogue. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2006.

---. Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Durand, Marcella (with Anselm Berrigan). Interview. The Verse Book of Interviews: 27 Poets on Language, Craft & Culture. Ed. Brian Henry and Andrew Zawacki. Amherst, MA: Verse Press, 2005.

Eberhart, Richard. Interview. The Poet’s Craft: Interviews from the New York Quarterly. New York: Paragon House, 1987. 255-261.

Eliot, T.S. Interview. Poets at Work: The Paris Review Interviews. Ed. George Plimpton. New York: Penguin Books, 1989.

Enslin, Theodore. Conversation with Edward Foster. Poetry and Poetics in a New Millennium. Ed. Edward Foster. Jersey City, NJ: Talisman House, 2000.

---. “The work itself, the place at either end.” Talking Poetry: Conversations in the Workshop with Contemporary Poets. Ed. Lee Bartlett. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1987.

Epstein, Daniel Mark. “Double Vision.” Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Edited by Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. 120-125.

Epstein, Seymour. Interview. Finding the Words: Conversations with Writers Who Teach. Edited by Nancy Bunge. Athens, OH: Swallow Press, 1985. 36-40.

Eshleman, Clayton. “Into the moonlight of his own holdings.” Talking Poetry: Conversations in the Workshop with Contemporary Poets. Ed. Lee Bartlett. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1987.

Espada, Martín. Interview. The Verse Book of Interviews: 27 Poets on Language, Craft & Culture. Ed. Brian Henry and Andrew Zawacki. Amherst, MA: Verse Press, 2005.

Everson, Willaim. “The claw moon talons the west.” Talking Poetry: Conversations in the Workshop with Contemporary Poets. Ed. Lee Bartlett. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1987.

fa*gan, Kate. Interview. The Verse Book of Interviews: 27 Poets on Language, Craft & Culture. Ed. Brian Henry and Andrew Zawacki. Amherst, MA: Verse Press, 2005.

Fahrner, Barbara. “Interpreting the ‘Kunstkammer.’ “ Interview by Hariett Watts. A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 476-488.

Ferlinghetti, Lawrence. Interview with Robert Dana on publishing. Against the Grain: Interviews with Maverick American Publishers. Ed. Robert Dana. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 1986.

Finkel, Donald. “Before the Beginning.” Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Edited by Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. 146-152.

Fitzgerald, Robert. Interview. Poets at Work: The Paris Review Interviews. Ed. George Plimpton. New York: Penguin Books, 1989.

Fraser, Kathleen. Interview (and Barbara Guest). Innovative Women Poets: An Anthology of Contemporary Poetry and Interviews. Ed. Elizabeth A. Frost and Cynthia Hogue. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2006.

---. “Placing Silence.” Conversation with Sarah Rosenthal. A Community Writing Itself: Conversations with Vanguard Writers of the Bay Area. Ed. Sarah Rosenthal. Champaign and London: Dalkey Archive, 2010.

--- with Patrick Pritchett. Letters. Letters to Poets: Conversations about Poetics, Politics, and Community. Ed. Jennifer Firestone and Dana Teen Lomax. Philadelphia: Saturnalia Books, 2008.

Frost, Robert. Interview. Poets at Work: The Paris Review Interviews. Ed. George Plimpton. New York: Penguin Books, 1989.

---. Interview. Tongues of Fallen Angels. Edited by Selden Rodman. New York: New Directions, 1974. 39-49.

Fulton, Alice. Interview. Innovative Women Poets: An Anthology of Contemporary Poetry and Interviews. Ed. Elizabeth A. Frost and Cynthia Hogue. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2006.

Gander, Forrest and John Kinsella. Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Ginsberg, Allen. Interview. Poets at Work: The Paris Review Interviews. Ed. George Plimpton. New York: Penguin Books, 1989.

---. Craft Interview. The Craft of Poetry: Interviews from the New York Quarterly. Ed. William Packard. New York: Doubleday, 1974.

---. Interview. The Sullen Art: Interviews by David Ossman with Modern American Poets. New York: Corinth Books, 1963. 87-95.

---. Interview. Tongues of Fallen Angels. Edited by Selden Rodman. New York: New Directions, 1974. 183-199.

---. Interview. Finding the Words: Conversations with Writers Who Teach. Edited by Nancy Bunge. Athens, OH: Swallow Press, 1985. 41-52.

---. Interview. Towards a New American Poetics: Essays & Interviews. Edited by Ekbert Faas. Santa Barbara: Black Sparrow Press, 1979. 269-288.

Glück, Louise. Conversation with Pearl London (1979). Poetry In Person: Twenty-five Years of Conversations with America’s Poets. Ed. Alexander Neubauer. New York: Knopf, 2010.

Glück, Robert. “A Community Writing Itself.” Conversation with Sarah Rosenthal. A Community Writing Itself: Conversations with Vanguard Writers of the Bay Area. Ed. Sarah Rosenthal. Champaign and London: Dalkey Archive, 2010.

Godine, David. Interview with Robert Dana on publishing. Against the Grain: Interviews with Maverick American Publishers. Ed. Robert Dana. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 1986.

Greenlaw, Lavinia. “Interior with Extension Cord.” Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Edited by Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. 274-276.

Grennan, Eamon. Conversation with Pearl London (1996). Poetry In Person: Twenty-five Years of Conversations with America’s Poets. Ed. Alexander Neubauer. New York: Knopf, 2010.

Grosholz, Emily. “Milosz and the Moral Authority of Poetry.” Conversant Essays: Contemporary Poets on Poetry. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1990. 65-78.

Grossman, Allen. Conversation with Mark Halliday. The Sighted Singer: Two Works on Poetry for Readers and Writers. Allen Grossman with Mark Halliday. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1992.

---. Conversation with Karen Volkman. 12x12: Conversations in 21st Century Poetry & Poetics. Ed. Christina Mengert and Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2009.

Guest, Barbara. Interview (and Kathleen Fraser). Innovative Women Poets: An Anthology of Contemporary Poetry and Interviews. Ed. Elizabeth A. Frost and Cynthia Hogue. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2006.

---. “Clearing the Ordinary from the Room.” Conversation with Sarah Rosenthal. A Community Writing Itself: Conversations with Vanguard Writers of the Bay Area. Ed. Sarah Rosenthal. Champaign and London: Dalkey Archive, 2010.

Gunn, Thom. “For a sign of other than love.” Talking Poetry: Conversations in the Workshop with Contemporary Poets. Ed. Lee Bartlett. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1987.

Guss, David. “Reading the Mesa: An Interview with Eduardo Calderon.” The Book, Spiritual Instrument. Edited by Jerome Rothenburg and David Guss. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 45-51.

Hacker, Marilyn. Conversation with Pearl London (1980). Poetry In Person: Twenty-five Years of Conversations with America’s Poets. Ed. Alexander Neubauer. New York: Knopf, 2010.

Hahn, Kimiko. “Magic: Power: Activation: Transformation.” Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Interview. Edited by Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. 183-190.

Hall, Donald. “On the Periphery of Time.” Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Edited by Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. 191-195.

Halpern, Daniel. Interview with Robert Dana on publishing. Against the Grain: Interviews with Maverick American Publishers. Ed. Robert Dana. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 1986.

Halpern, Rob. Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Hamill, Sam. Interview with Robert Dana on publishing. Against the Grain: Interviews with Maverick American Publishers. Ed. Robert Dana. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 1986.

Harper, Michael S. and Aldon Lynn Nielsen. Conversation. The Furious Flowering of African American Poetry. Ed. Joanne V. Gabbin. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1999.

---. Interviewed by James Randall. American Poetry Observed: Poets on Their Work. Edited by Joe David Bellamy. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1984. 88-100.

Hart, Kevin. Interview. The Verse Book of Interviews: 27 Poets on Language, Craft & Culture. Ed. Brian Henry and Andrew Zawacki. Amherst, MA: Verse Press, 2005.

Harryman, Carla. Conversation with Sawako Nakayasu. 12x12: Conversations in 21st Century Poetry & Poetics. Ed. Christina Mengert and Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2009.

Hass, Robert. Conversation with Pearl London (1977). Poetry In Person: Twenty-five Years of Conversations with America’s Poets. Ed. Alexander Neubauer. New York: Knopf, 2010.

Hawkes, John. Interview by John J. Enck. The Contemporary Writer: Interviews with Sixteen Novelists and Poets. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1972. 3-17.

Hecht, Anthony. Interview. Fourteen on Form: Conversations with Poets. Baer, William. Oxford, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 2004. 65-77.

Heller, Michael. Conversation with Edward Foster. Poetry and Poetics in a New Millennium. Ed. Edward Foster. Jersey City, NJ: Talisman House, 2000.

Hemingway, Ernest. Interview. Tongues of Fallen Angels. Edited by Selden Rodman. New York: New Directions, 1974. 51-61.

Hill, Selima. “Racoons – or, Can Art Be Evil?” Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Edited by Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. 245-247.

Hillman, Brenda. “Our Very Greatest Human Thing Is Wild.” Conversation with Sarah Rosenthal. A Community Writing Itself: Conversations with Vanguard Writers of the Bay Area. Ed. Sarah Rosenthal. Champaign and London: Dalkey Archive, 2010.

Hirsch, Edward. Conversation with Pearl London (1993). Poetry In Person: Twenty-five Years of Conversations with America’s Poets. Ed. Alexander Neubauer. New York: Knopf, 2010.

Hofer, Jen. Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Hofman, Michael. “I happen to believe.” Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Edited by Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. 241-242.

Hollander, John. Interview. Fourteen on Form: Conversations with Poets. Baer, William. Oxford, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 2004. 216-236.

---. “The Candle in the Pitcher.” Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Edited by Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. 196-205.

Hollo, Anselm. “Anselm Hollo and Translation.” Postmodern Poetry: The Talisman Interviews. Edited by Edward Foster. Hoboken: Talisman House, 1994. 41-47.

Holub, Miroslav. Interview. The Verse Book of Interviews: 27 Poets on Language, Craft & Culture. Ed. Brian Henry and Andrew Zawacki. Amherst, MA: Verse Press, 2005.

Hong, Cathy Park. Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Hoover, Paul and Albert Flynn Desilver. Letters. Letters to Poets: Conversations about Poetics, Politics, and Community. Ed. Jennifer Firestone and Dana Teen Lomax. Philadelphia: Saturnalia Books, 2008.

Howe, Fanny. Interview. What Is Poetry: Conversations with the American Avant-Garde. Ed. Daniel Kane. New York: Teachers & Writers Books, 2003.

Howe, Susan. Interview. Innovative Women Poets: An Anthology of Contemporary Poetry and Interviews. Ed. Elizabeth A. Frost and Cynthia Hogue. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2006.

---. Interview. Postmodern Poetry: The Talisman Interviews. Edited by Edward Foster. Hoboken: Talisman House, 1994. 48-68.

Hugo, Richard. Interview by David Dillon. American Poetry Observed: Poets on Their Work. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1984. 101-113.

Hume, Christine. (with Laura Solomon). Interview. The Verse Book of Interviews: 27 Poets on Language, Craft & Culture. Ed. Brian Henry and Andrew Zawacki. Amherst, MA: Verse Press, 2005.

Ignatow, David. “Answering the Dark.” Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Edited by Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. 172-177.

Irby, Kenneth. “The breath on the edge of the lip.” Talking Poetry: Conversations in the Workshop with Contemporary Poets. Ed. Lee Bartlett. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1987.

Jabes, Edmond. “The Book and the Desert/[Wilderness]: An Interview.” The Book, Spiritual Instrument. Edited by Jerome Rothenburg and David Guss. New York: Granary Books, 2000. 124-134.

Jamie, Kathleen. “Holding Fast – Truth and Change in Poetry.” Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Edited by Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. 277-281.

Jarnot, Lisa. Interview. The Verse Book of Interviews: 27 Poets on Language, Craft & Culture. Ed. Brian Henry and Andrew Zawacki. Amherst, MA: Verse Press, 2005.

---. Interview. What Is Poetry: Conversations with the American Avant-Garde. Ed. Daniel Kane. New York: Teachers & Writers Books, 2003.

---. Conversation with Jennifer Reeves. We Saw the Light: Conversations between the New American Cinema and Poetry. Daniel Kane. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2009.

Jones, Gayl. Interview. Chant of Saints: A Gathering of Afro-American Literature, Art, and Scholarship. Ed. Michael S. Harper & Robert B. Stepto. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1979.

Jones, LeRoi. Interview. The Sullen Art: Interviews by David Ossman with Modern American Poets. New York: Corinth Books, 1963. 77-81.

Jong, Erica. Craft Interview. The Craft of Poetry: Interviews from the New York Quarterly. Ed. William Packard. New York: Doubleday, 1974.

Jordan, June. Conversation with Pearl London (1979). Poetry In Person: Twenty-five Years of Conversations with America’s Poets. Ed. Alexander Neubauer. New York: Knopf, 2010.

Justice, Donald. Interview. Fourteen on Form: Conversations with Poets. Baer, William. Oxford, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 2004. 78-100.

---. Interview by Wayne Dodd and Stanley Plumly. American Poetry Observed: Poets on Their Work. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1984. 114-133.

Kapil, Bhanu. Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Karstons, Sophia & Cynthia Arrieu-King. Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Kelly, Robert. Interview. The Sullen Art: Interviews by David Ossman with Modern American Poets. New York: Corinth Books, 1963. 33-39.

Kennedy, X.J. Interview. Fourteen on Form: Conversations with Poets. Baer, William. Oxford, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 2004. 237-254.

Kinnell, Galway. Craft Interview. The Craft of Poetry: Interviews from the New York Quarterly. Ed. William Packard. New York: Doubleday, 1974.

---. Conversation with Pearl London (1981). Poetry In Person: Twenty-five Years of Conversations with America’s Poets. Ed. Alexander Neubauer. New York: Knopf, 2010.

---. Interview by Karla Landsfield, John Jackson, and Cheryl Sharp. American Poetry Observed: Poets on Their Work. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1984. 134-142.

Kinsella, John. Interview. The Verse Book of Interviews: 27 Poets on Language, Craft & Culture. Ed. Brian Henry and Andrew Zawacki. Amherst, MA: Verse Press, 2005.

Kleinzahler, August. Interview. The Verse Book of Interviews: 27 Poets on Language, Craft & Culture. Ed. Brian Henry and Andrew Zawacki. Amherst, MA: Verse Press, 2005.

Koch, Kenneth. Interview. What Is Poetry: Conversations with the American Avant-Garde. Ed. Daniel Kane. New York: Teachers & Writers Books, 2003.

Koestenbaum, Wayne. Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Kumin, Maxine. Conversation with Pearl London (1973). Poetry In Person: Twenty-five Years of Conversations with America’s Poets. Ed. Alexander Neubauer. New York: Knopf, 2010.

---. Interview. Fourteen on Form: Conversations with Poets. Baer, William. Oxford, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 2004. 21-39.

---. “Settling in Another Field.” Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Edited by Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. 107-113.

Kunin, Aaron. Conversation with Ben Lerner. 12x12: Conversations in 21st Century Poetry & Poetics. Ed. Christina Mengert and Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2009.

Kunitz, Stanley. Craft Interview. The Craft of Poetry: Interviews from the New York Quarterly. Ed. William Packard. New York: Doubleday, 1974.

---. Interview. Tongues of Fallen Angels. Edited by Selden Rodman. New York: New Directions, 1974. 93-111.

---. Interview by Michael Ryan. American Poetry Observed: Poets on Their Work. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1984. 143-154.

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---. Interview. The Sullen Art: Interviews by David Ossman with Modern American Poets. New York: Corinth Books, 1963. 73-76.

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---. Interview. Postmodern Poetry: The Talisman Interviews. Edited by Edward Foster. Hoboken: Talisman House, 1994. 69-83.

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Major, Clarence. Interview. Finding the Words: Conversations with Writers Who Teach. Edited by Nancy Bunge. Athens, OH: Swallow Press, 1985. 53-67.

Manfred, Frederick. Interview. Finding the Words: Conversations with Writers Who Teach. Edited by Nancy Bunge. Athens, OH: Swallow Press, 1985. 68-82.

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Martin, John. Interview with Robert Dana on publishing (Black Sparrow). Against the Grain: Interviews with Maverick American Publishers. Ed. Robert Dana. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 1986.

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Maxwel, Glyn. “Strictures.” Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Edited by Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. 256-258.

Mayer, Bernadette. Interview. What Is Poetry: Conversations with the American Avant-Garde. Ed. Daniel Kane. New York: Teachers & Writers Books, 2003.

McGuckian, Medbh. Interview. The Verse Book of Interviews: 27 Poets on Language, Craft & Culture. Ed. Brian Henry and Andrew Zawacki. Amherst, MA: Verse Press, 2005.

---. “And Cry Jesus to the Mice.” Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Edited by Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. 219-221.

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---. Interview by Donald Sheehan. The Contemporary Writer: Interviews with Sixteen Novelists and Poets. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1972. 139-152.

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---. Interview b. Ed. Folsom and Carey Nelson. American Poetry Observed: Poets on Their Work. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1984. 168-180.

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Miles, Josephine. Interview by Sanford Pinsker. American Poetry Observed: Poets on Their Work. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1984. 181-189.

Momaday, N. Scott. Interview. Finding the Words: Conversations with Writers Who Teach. Edited by Nancy Bunge. Athens, OH: Swallow Press, 1985. 87-95.

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Mueller, Lisel. Interview. Finding the Words: Conversations with Writers Who Teach. Edited by Nancy Bunge. Athens, OH: Swallow Press, 1985. 96-105.

Muldoon, Paul. Conversation with Pearl London (1995). Poetry In Person: Twenty-five Years of Conversations with America’s Poets. Ed. Alexander Neubauer. New York: Knopf, 2010.

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---. Interview. What Is Poetry: Conversations with the American Avant-Garde. Ed. Daniel Kane. New York: Teachers & Writers Books, 2003.

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Myles, Eileen. Conversation with Edward Foster. Poetry and Poetics in a New Millennium. Ed. Edward Foster. Jersey City, NJ: Talisman House, 2000.

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Neto, Joao Cabral de Melo. Interview. Tongues of Fallen Angels. Edited by Selden Rodman. New York: New Directions, 1974. 219-231.

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---. Conversation (1) with Edward Foster. Poetry and Poetics in a New Millennium. Ed. Edward Foster. Jersey City, NJ: Talisman House, 2000.

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O’Brien, Sean. “Proceedings in Palmersville.” Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Edited by Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. 236-240.

O’Donoghue, Bernard. “Poetry’s Concern.” Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Edited by Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. 222-225.

Oppen, George. Interview by L.S. Dembo. The Contemporary Writer: Interviews with Sixteen Novelists and Poets. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1972. 172-190.

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Ostriker, Alicia. Interview. Innovative Women Poets: An Anthology of Contemporary Poetry and Interviews. Ed. Elizabeth A. Frost and Cynthia Hogue. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2006.

Owen, Maureen. Conversation with Edward Foster. Poetry and Poetics in a New Millennium. Ed. Edward Foster. Jersey City, NJ: Talisman House, 2000.

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Padgett, Ron. Conversation with Edward Foster. Poetry and Poetics in a New Millennium. Ed. Edward Foster. Jersey City, NJ: Talisman House, 2000.

---. Interview. Postmodern Poetry: The Talisman Interviews. Edited by Edward Foster. Hoboken: Talisman House, 1994. 99-114.

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---. “The Recovery of Language.” Conversation with Sarah Rosenthal. A Community Writing Itself: Conversations with Vanguard Writers of the Bay Area. Ed. Sarah Rosenthal. Champaign and London: Dalkey Archive, 2010.

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Pastan, Linda. “Unbreakable Codes.” Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Edited by Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. 158-163.

Paterson, Don. Interview. The Verse Book of Interviews: 27 Poets on Language, Craft & Culture. Ed. Brian Henry and Andrew Zawacki. Amherst, MA: Verse Press, 2005.

---. “Aphorisms.” Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Edited by Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. 282-286.

Paz, Octavio. Interview. Tongues of Fallen Angels. Edited by Selden Rodman. New York: New Directions, 1974. 135-161.

Peaco*ck, Molly. Conversation with Pearl London (1992). Poetry In Person: Twenty-five Years of Conversations with America’s Poets. Ed. Alexander Neubauer. New York: Knopf, 2010.

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Piercy, Marge. “Shaping Our Choices.” Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Edited by Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. 178-182.

Pinsky, Robert. Conversation with Pearl London (1993). Poetry In Person: Twenty-five Years of Conversations with America’s Poets. Ed. Alexander Neubauer. New York: Knopf, 2010.

Place, Vanessa. Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Plath, Sylvia. “An Interview.” 20th Century Poetry & Poetics. Fourth Edition. Ed. Gary Geddes. Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996.

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---. “The Path of Saying.” Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Edited by Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. 1-6.

Pound, Ezra. Interview. Poets at Work: The Paris Review Interviews. Ed. George Plimpton. New York: Penguin Books, 1989.

Purdy, Al. “An Interview.” 20th Century Poetry & Poetics. Fourth Edition. Ed. Gary Geddes. Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1996.

Rakosi, Carl. Interview by L.S. Dembo. The Contemporary Writer: Interviews with Sixteen Novelists and Poets. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1972. 191-295.

Ramsdell, Heather. Interview. The Verse Book of Interviews: 27 Poets on Language, Craft & Culture. Ed. Brian Henry and Andrew Zawacki. Amherst, MA: Verse Press, 2005.

Rankine, Claudia. Interview. The Verse Book of Interviews: 27 Poets on Language, Craft & Culture. Ed. Brian Henry and Andrew Zawacki. Amherst, MA: Verse Press, 2005.

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Ratcliffe, Stephen. “Artifice and Accident.” Conversation with Sarah Rosenthal. A Community Writing Itself: Conversations with Vanguard Writers of the Bay Area. Ed. Sarah Rosenthal. Champaign and London: Dalkey Archive, 2010.

Raworth, Tom. “A curious hand touches the snow raising pigeons.” Talking Poetry: Conversations in the Workshop with Contemporary Poets. Ed. Lee Bartlett. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1987.

Redmond, Eugene and Jabari Asm. Conversation. The Furious Flowering of African American Poetry. Ed. Joanne V. Gabbin. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1999.

Reddy, Srikanth. Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Reed, Ishmael. “And that history is subject to the will.” Talking Poetry: Conversations in the Workshop with Contemporary Poets. Ed. Lee Bartlett. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1987.

Reilly, Evelyn. Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Retallack, Joan and Brenda Iijima. Letters. Letters to Poets: Conversations about Poetics, Politics, and Community. Ed. Jennifer Firestone and Dana Teen Lomax. Philadelphia: Saturnalia Books, 2008.

Rexilius, Andrea. Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Rexroth, Kenneth. Interview. The Sullen Art: Interviews by David Ossman with Modern American Poets. New York: Corinth Books, 1963. 10-16.

---. Interview by Cyrena N. Pondrom. The Contemporary Writer: Interviews with Sixteen Novelists and Poets. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1972. 153-171.

Reznikoff, Charles. Interview by L.S. Dembo. The Contemporary Writer: Interviews with Sixteen Novelists and Poets. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1972. 206-215.

Rich, Adrienne. Interview by Elly Bulkin. American Poetry Observed: Poets on Their Work. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1984. 190-197.

Richard, Frances. Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Robertson, Lisa. Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Robinson, Elizabeth. “Falling Is the Safest Thing to Do.” Conversation with Sarah Rosenthal. A Community Writing Itself: Conversations with Vanguard Writers of the Bay Area. Ed. Sarah Rosenthal. Champaign and London: Dalkey Archive, 2010.

Rodefer, Stephen. “I inhabit the language the world heaps upon me.” Talking Poetry: Conversations in the Workshop with Contemporary Poets. Ed. Lee Bartlett. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1987.

Rohrer, Matthew. Interview. The Verse Book of Interviews: 27 Poets on Language, Craft & Culture. Ed. Brian Henry and Andrew Zawacki. Amherst, MA: Verse Press, 2005.

Rothenberg, Jerome. Craft Interview. The Craft of Poetry: Interviews from the New York Quarterly. Ed. William Packard. New York: Doubleday, 1974.

---. Interview. The Sullen Art: Interviews by David Ossman with Modern American Poets. New York: Corinth Books, 1963. 27-32.

Roy, Camille. “Experience Is a Demanding Mistress.” Conversation with Sarah Rosenthal. A Community Writing Itself: Conversations with Vanguard Writers of the Bay Area. Ed. Sarah Rosenthal. Champaign and London: Dalkey Archive, 2010.

Royet-Journoud, Claude and Emmaneul Hocquard. “Conversation…1982.” Code of Signals: Recent Writings in Poetics. Ed. Michael Palmer. Berkeley: North Atlantic Books, 1983.

Rukeyser, Muriel. Craft Interview. The Craft of Poetry: Interviews from the New York Quarterly. Ed. William Packard. New York: Doubleday, 1974.

---. Conversation with Pearl London (1978). Poetry In Person: Twenty-five Years of Conversations with America’s Poets. Ed. Alexander Neubauer. New York: Knopf, 2010.

Rumsey, Tessa. Interview. The Verse Book of Interviews: 27 Poets on Language, Craft & Culture. Ed. Brian Henry and Andrew Zawacki. Amherst, MA: Verse Press, 2005.

Salamun, Tomaz. Interview. The Verse Book of Interviews: 27 Poets on Language, Craft & Culture. Ed. Brian Henry and Andrew Zawacki. Amherst, MA: Verse Press, 2005.

---. Conversation with Christian Hawkey. 12x12: Conversations in 21st Century Poetry & Poetics. Ed. Christina Mengert and Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2009.

Sanchez, Sonia. Interview. Innovative Women Poets: An Anthology of Contemporary Poetry and Interviews. Ed. Elizabeth A. Frost and Cynthia Hogue. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2006.

Sanders, Edward. “Interview by Junior Burke.” Beats at Naropa. Ed. Anne Waldman and Laura Wright. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2009.

Sarton, Mary. Interview by Karla Hammond. American Poetry Observed: Poets on Their Work. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1984. 198-206.

Scalapino, Leslie. Interview. Innovative Women Poets: An Anthology of Contemporary Poetry and Interviews. Ed. Elizabeth A. Frost and Cynthia Hogue. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2006.

--- and Judith Goldman. Letters. Letters to Poets: Conversations about Poetics, Politics, and Community. Ed. Jennifer Firestone and Dana Teen Lomax. Philadelphia: Saturnalia Books, 2008.

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Schmidt, Chris. Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Schomburg, Zachary. Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Schwartz, Leonard. Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Schwerner, Armand. Conversation with Edward Foster. Poetry and Poetics in a New Millennium. Ed. Edward Foster. Jersey City, NJ: Talisman House, 2000.

Sexton, Anne. Interview. Poets at Work: The Paris Review Interviews. Ed. George Plimpton. New York: Penguin Books, 1989.

---. Craft Interview. The Craft of Poetry: Interviews from the New York Quarterly. Ed. William Packard. New York: Doubleday, 1974.

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Shapiro, Karl. Interview. The Poet’s Craft: Interviews from the New York Quarterly. New York: Paragon House, 1987. 299-304.

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Shimoda, Brandon. Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Shockley, Evie. Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Sikelianos, Eleni. Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Simic, Charles. Conversation with Pearl London (1995). Poetry In Person: Twenty-five Years of Conversations with America’s Poets. Ed. Alexander Neubauer. New York: Knopf, 2010.

---. Interview by Wayne Dodd and Stanley Plumly. American Poetry Observed: Poets on Their Work. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1984. 207-218.

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Singer, Isaac Bashevis. Interview by Cyrena N. Pondrum. The Contemporary Writer: Interviews with Sixteen Novelists and Poets. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1972. 61-112.

Smith, Dale. Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Smith, Rod & Cole Swensen. Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Snodgrass, W.D. Interview. Fourteen on Form: Conversations with Poets. Baer, William. Oxford, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 2004. 193-215.

---. Interview. The Poet’s Craft: Interviews from the New York Quarterly. New York: Paragon House, 1987. 218-239.

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Snyder, Gary. Interview. The Poet’s Craft: Interviews from the New York Quarterly. New York: Paragon House, 1987. 270-286.

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Sobin, Gustaff. Interview. Postmodern Poetry: The Talisman Interviews. Edited by Edward Foster. Hoboken: Talisman House, 1994. 124-138.

Solomon, Laura. Interview. The Verse Book of Interviews: 27 Poets on Language, Craft & Culture. Ed. Brian Henry and Andrew Zawacki. Amherst, MA: Verse Press, 2005.

Sorrentino, Gilbert. Interview. The Sullen Art: Interviews by David Ossman with Modern American Poets. New York: Corinth Books, 1963. 46-55.

Spahr, Juliana. “How Does the Work Get Used.” Conversation with Sarah Rosenthal. A Community Writing Itself: Conversations with Vanguard Writers of the Bay Area. Ed. Sarah Rosenthal. Champaign and London: Dalkey Archive, 2010.

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St. John, David “Renaming the Present.” Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Edited by Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. 77-83.

Stafford, William. “Emergencies of the Moment.” Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Edited by Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. 126-131.

---. Interview. Finding the Words: Conversations with Writers Who Teach. Edited by Nancy Bunge. Athens, OH: Swallow Press, 1985. 106-117.

---. Interview by Dave Smith. American Poetry Observed: Poets on Their Work. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1984. 231-237.

Stefans, Brian Kim. Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Stegner, Wallace. Interview. Finding the Words: Conversations with Writers Who Teach. Edited by Nancy Bunge. Athens, OH: Swallow Press, 1985. 118-127.

Strand, Mark. Interview by Richard Vine and Robert von Hallberg. American Poetry Observed: Poets on Their Work. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1984. 238-247.

---. “Untelling the Hour.” Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Edited by Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. 13-18.

Sullivan, Gary. Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Sundman, Per Olof. Interview by L.S. Dembo. The Contemporary Writer: Interviews with Sixteen Novelists and Poets. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1972. 128-136.

Swensen, Cole. Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Swenson, May. Interview. The Poet’s Craft: Interviews from the New York Quarterly. New York: Paragon House, 1987. 240-254.

Swenson, Tree. Interview with Robert Dana on publishing (Copper Canyon). Against the Grain: Interviews with Maverick American Publishers. Ed. Robert Dana. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 1986.

Tarn, Nathaniel. “Over the fragile sails your hands would make.” Talking Poetry: Conversations in the Workshop with Contemporary Poets. Ed. Lee Bartlett. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1987.

Tate, James. Interview by Helena Minton, Louis Papineau, Cliff Saunders, and Karen Florsheim. American Poetry Observed: Poets on Their Work. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1984. 248-265.

Taylor, Catherine. Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Tiffany, Daniel. Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Torre, Monica de la. Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Tran, Truong. “I Became the Other.” Conversation with Sarah Rosenthal. A Community Writing Itself: Conversations with Vanguard Writers of the Bay Area. Ed. Sarah Rosenthal. Champaign and London: Dalkey Archive, 2010.

Troupe, Quincy and Traci Gourdine. Letters. Letters to Poets: Conversations about Poetics, Politics, and Community. Ed. Jennifer Firestone and Dana Teen Lomax. Philadelphia: Saturnalia Books, 2008.

Twemlow, Nick. Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Valentine, Jean. “The Hallowing of the Everyday.” Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Edited by Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. 27-31.

Vicuña, Cecilia and Jill Magi. Letters. Letters to Poets: Conversations about Poetics, Politics, and Community. Ed. Jennifer Firestone and Dana Teen Lomax. Philadelphia: Saturnalia Books, 2008.

Vitiello, Chris. Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Wagoner, David. Interview by Philip Dacey. American Poetry Observed: Poets on Their Work. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1984. 266-274.

Wakoski, Diane. Craft Interview. The Craft of Poetry: Interviews from the New York Quarterly. Ed. William Packard. New York: Doubleday, 1974.

---. “Listening for whatever there was to hear.” Talking Poetry: Conversations in the Workshop with Contemporary Poets. Ed. Lee Bartlett. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1987.

---. Interview. Finding the Words: Conversations with Writers Who Teach. Edited by Nancy Bunge. Athens, OH: Swallow Press, 1985. 128-144.

---. Interview by Lawrence Smith. American Poetry Observed: Poets on Their Work. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1984. 275-284.

Walcott, Derek. “Reflections before and after Carnival.” Chant of Saints: A Gathering of Afro-American Literature, Art, and Scholarship. Ed. Michael S. Harper & Robert B. Stepto. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1979. p. 296.

---. Conversation with Pearl London (1982). Poetry In Person: Twenty-five Years of Conversations with America’s Poets. Ed. Alexander Neubauer. New York: Knopf, 2010.

---. “In Conversation.” Strong Words: Modern Poets on Modern Poetry. Edited by W.N. Herbert and Matthew Hollis. Northumberland: Bloodaxe, 2000. 167-171.

---. Interview. Fourteen on Form: Conversations with Poets. Baer, William. Oxford, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 2004. 40-53.

---. Interview. Tongues of Fallen Angels. Edited by Selden Rodman. New York: New Directions, 1974. 233-259.

Waldman, Anne. Conversation with Edward Foster. Poetry and Poetics in a New Millennium. Ed. Edward Foster. Jersey City, NJ: Talisman House, 2000.

---. “Everything run along in creation till I end the song.” Talking Poetry: Conversations in the Workshop with Contemporary Poets. Ed. Lee Bartlett. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1987.

--- and Karen Weiser. Letters. Letters to Poets: Conversations about Poetics, Politics, and Community. Ed. Jennifer Firestone and Dana Teen Lomax. Philadelphia: Saturnalia Books, 2008.

---. Interview. Finding the Words: Conversations with Writers Who Teach. Edited by Nancy Bunge. Athens, OH: Swallow Press, 1985. 145-156.

Waldrop, Rosmarie. Conversation with Christine Hume. 12x12: Conversations in 21st Century Poetry & Poetics. Ed. Christina Mengert and Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2009.

---. Interview. Postmodern Poetry: The Talisman Interviews. Edited by Edward Foster. Hoboken: Talisman House, 1994. 139-152.

Ward, Dana. Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Warren, Robert Penn. Interview. Poets at Work: The Paris Review Interviews. Ed. George Plimpton. New York: Penguin Books, 1989.

---. “On the Horizon of Time.” Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Edited by Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. 53-60.

Warsh, Lewish. Interview. What Is Poetry: Conversations with the American Avant-Garde. Ed. Daniel Kane. New York: Teachers & Writers Books, 2003.

---. Conversation with Edward Foster. Poetry and Poetics in a New Millennium. Ed. Edward Foster. Jersey City, NJ: Talisman House, 2000.

Weiss, Theodore. Interview. Finding the Words: Conversations with Writers Who Teach. Edited by Nancy Bunge. Athens, OH: Swallow Press, 1985. 157-170.

Welish, Marjoie. Interview. The Verse Book of Interviews: 27 Poets on Language, Craft & Culture. Ed. Brian Henry and Andrew Zawacki. Amherst, MA: Verse Press, 2005.

---. Interview. What Is Poetry: Conversations with the American Avant-Garde. Ed. Daniel Kane. New York: Teachers & Writers Books, 2003.

Wetherington, Laura. Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Wier, Dara. Interview. The Verse Book of Interviews: 27 Poets on Language, Craft & Culture. Ed. Brian Henry and Andrew Zawacki. Amherst, MA: Verse Press, 2005.

---. Conversation with Paul Fattaruso. 12x12: Conversations in 21st Century Poetry & Poetics. Ed. Christina Mengert and Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2009.

---. “The Languages of Illusion.” Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Edited by Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. 132-139.

Wilbur, Richard. Craft Interview. The Craft of Poetry: Interviews from the New York Quarterly. Ed. William Packard. New York: Doubleday, 1974.

---. Interview by David Dillon. American Poetry Observed: Poets on Their Work. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1984. 285-295.

---. Interview. Finding the Words: Conversations with Writers Who Teach. Edited by Nancy Bunge. Athens, OH: Swallow Press, 1985. 171-181.

---. Interview. Fourteen on Form: Conversations with Poets. Baer, William. Oxford, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 2004. 3-20.

---. “The Mystery of Things that Are.” Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Edited by Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. 140-145.

Williams, C.K. Conversation with Pearl London (1988). Poetry In Person: Twenty-five Years of Conversations with America’s Poets. Ed. Alexander Neubauer. New York: Knopf, 2010.

Williams, Hugo. “Leaping Versus Blabbing.” Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Edited by Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. 229-232.

Williams, John Hartley. “A Manifesto.” Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Edited by Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. 287-288.

Williams, Jonathan. Interview with Robert Dana on publishing. Against the Grain: Interviews with Maverick American Publishers. Ed. Robert Dana. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 1986.

Williams, Miller. “The Sanctioned Babel.” Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Edited by Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. 7-12.

Williams, Sherley Anne and Deborah McDowell. Conversation. The Furious Flowering of African American Poetry. Ed. Joanne V. Gabbin. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1999.

Williams, Tyrone. Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Williams, William Carlos. Interview. Poets at Work: The Paris Review Interviews. Ed. George Plimpton. New York: Penguin Books, 1989.

Wilson, Ronaldo V. Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Wright, C.D. Interview. Innovative Women Poets: An Anthology of Contemporary Poetry and Interviews. Ed. Elizabeth A. Frost and Cynthia Hogue. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2006.

Wright, Charles. Interview. The Verse Book of Interviews: 27 Poets on Language, Craft & Culture. Ed. Brian Henry and Andrew Zawacki. Amherst, MA: Verse Press, 2005.

Wright, James. Interview by Bruce Henrickson. American Poetry Observed: Poets on Their Work. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1984. 296-309.

Yankelevich, Matvei. Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Yau, John. Interview. The Verse Book of Interviews: 27 Poets on Language, Craft & Culture. Ed. Brian Henry and Andrew Zawacki. Amherst, MA: Verse Press, 2005.

---. Interview. Postmodern Poetry: The Talisman Interviews. Edited by Edward Foster. Hoboken: Talisman House, 1994. 153-174.

--- and Anselm Berrigan. Letters. Letters to Poets: Conversations about Poetics, Politics, and Community. Ed. Jennifer Firestone and Dana Teen Lomax. Philadelphia: Saturnalia Books, 2008.

Yglesias, Helen. Interview. Finding the Words: Conversations with Writers Who Teach. Edited by Nancy Bunge. Athens, OH: Swallow Press, 1985. 182-189.

Zhang, Jenny. Interview. Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch, with an Afterword by Amaranth Borsuk. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014.

Zukofsky, Louis. Interview by L.S. Dembo. The Contemporary Writer: Interviews with Sixteen Novelists and Poets. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1972. 216-232.

Anthologies of Interviews / Conversations with Poets

12x12: Conversations in 21st Century Poetry & Poetics. Ed. Christina Mengert and Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2009. [including conversations between Jon Woodward & Rae Armantrout; Ben Lerner & Aaron Kunin; Jennifer K. Dick & Laura Mullen; Srikanth Reddy & Mark Levine; Christine Hume & Rosmarie Waldrop; Sawako Nakayasu & Carla Harryman; Karen Volkman & Allen Grossman; Michelle Robinson & Paul Auster; Sabrina Orah Mark & Claudia Rankine; Christian Hawkey & Tomaz Salamun; Mark Yakich & Mary Leader; and Paul Fattaruso & Dara Wier]

Acts of Mind: Conversations with Contemporary Poets. Ed. Richard Jackson. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1983. [interviews with Plumly, Miller Williams, Strand, Simic, Valentine, Ammons, Muske, Merwin, Warren, Bell, Ashbery, St. John, Booth, McHugh, Pack, Kumin, Kunitz, Epstein, Stafford, Wier, Wilbur, Finkel, Chappell, Pastan, Creeley, Ignatow, Piercy, Harper, Hall, Hollander]

Against the Grain: Interviews with Maverick American Publishers. Ed. Robert Dana. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 1986. [Including: Harry Duncan, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, David Godine, Daniel Halpern, Sam Hamill, James Laughlin, John Martin, Tree Swenson, and Jonathan Williams.]

American Poetry Observed: Poets on Their Work. Ed. Joe David Bellamy. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1984. [Interviews with Ai, Ashbery, Bell, Benedikt, Bishop, Bly, Dickey, Harper, Hugo, Justice, Kinnell, Kunitz, Levertov, Merwin, Miles, Rich, Sarton, Simic, Snodgrass, Stafford, Strand, Tate, Wagoner, Wakoski, Wilbur, James Wright.]

Chant of Saints: A Gathering of Afro-American Literature, Art, and Scholarship. Ed. Michael S. Harper & Robert B. Stepto. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1979. [including an interview with Walcott—as well as Ellison, Morrison, and Gayl Jones.]

A Community Writing Itself: Conversations with Vanguard Writers of the Bay Area. Ed. Sarah Rosenthal. Champaign and London: Dalkey Archive, 2010. [including interviews with Fraser, Gluck, Barbara Guest, Hillman, Mackey, Palmer, Ratcliffe, Robinson, Camille Roy, Scalapino, Spahr, Truong Tran.]

The Contemporary Writer: Interviews with Sixteen Novelists and Poets. Ed. L.S. Dembo and Cyrena N. Pondrom. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1972. [Hawkes, Barth, Bellow, Nabokov, Singer, Borges, Lidman, Sundman, James Merrill, Rexroth, Oppen, Rakosi, Reznikoff, Zukofsky, Brooks, George Barker.]

The Craft of Poetry: Interviews from the New York Quarterly. Ed. William Packard. New York: Doubleday, 1974. [including interviews with Auden, Blackburn, Sexton, Kunitz, Rothenberg, Ginsberg, Levertov, Kinnell, Ashbery, Dickey, Rukeyser, Wilbur, Creeley, Mac Low, Howard Moss, Jong, Wakoski,]

Finding the Words: Conversations with Writers Who Teach. Ed. Nancy Bunge. Athens, OH: Swallow Press, 1985. [Conversations with Marvin Bell, Kelly Cherry, Seymour Epstein, Allen Ginsberg, Clarence Major, Frederick Manfred, James Alan McPherson, N. Scott Momaday, Lisel Mueller, William Stafford, Wallace Stegner, Wakoski, Waldman, Weiss, Wilbur, Yglesias.]

Fourteen on Form: Conversations with Poets. Ed. William Baer. Oxford, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 2009. [interviews with Richard Wilbur, Kumin, Walcott, Willis Barnstone, Hecht, Justice, Douglas Dunn, Robert Conquest, Nims, Cope, Frederick Morgan, Snodgrass, Hollander, X.J. Kennedy]

The Furious Flowering of African American Poetry. Ed. Joanne V. Gabbin. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1999. [including conversations with: Michael S. Harper & Aldon Lynn Nielsen; Eugene Redmond & Jabari Asim; Amiri Baraka & Askia Toure; Sherley Anne Williams & Deborah McDowell; Margaret Walker Alexander & Joanne V. Gabbin; Gwendolyn Brooks & B. Denise Hawkins]

Innovative Women Poets: An Anthology of Contemporary Poetry and Interviews. Ed. Elizabeth A. Frost and Cynthia Hogue. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2006. [including interviews with: Anzaldua, Berssenbrugge, Jayne Cortez, DuPlessis, Alice Fulton, Susan Howe, Harryette Mullen, Alice Notley, Ostriker, Sonia Sanchez, Scalapino, C.D. Wright, Barbara Guest & Kathleen Fraser.]

The Letter Machine Book of Interviews. Ed. Cristiana Baik & Andy Fitch. Tucson, AZ: Letter Machine Editions, 2015. [including interviews with: Rosa Alcalá, Anselm Berrigan, Edmund Berrigan, Julie Carr, Danielle Dutton, Renee Gladman, Sarah Gridley, Aaron Kunin, Dorothea Lasky, Juliana Leslie, Dawn Lundy Martin, Farid Matuk, Fred Moten, Jennifer Moxley,Sawako Nakayasu, Hoa Nguyen, Travis Nichols, Peter O'Leary, John Olson, Andrea Rexilus, Abraham Smith, Sasha Steensen, Nathalie Stephens, Donna Stonecipher, Tyrone Williams, & Sara Veglahn]

Letters to Poets: Conversations about Poetics, Politics, and Community. Ed. Jennifer Firestone and Dana Teen Lomax. Philadelphia: Saturnalia Books, 2008. [Anselm Berrigan with John Yau; Brenda Cuoltas & Victor Hernandez Cruz; Truong Tran & Wanda Coleman; Patrick Pritchett & Kathleen Fraser; Hajera Ghori & Alfred Arteaga; Jennifer Firestone & Eileen Myles; Karen Wiser & Anne Waldman; Jill Magi & Cecilia Vicuña; Rosamond S. King & Jayne Cortez; Judith Goldman & Leslie Scalapino; Traci Gourdine & Quincy Troupe; Brenda Iijima & Joan Retallack; Dana Teen Lomax & Claire Braz-Valentine; Albert Flynn Desilver & Paul Hoover.]

Looking Up Harryette Mullen: Interviews on Sleeping with the Dictionary and Other Works. Barbara Henning. New York: Belladonna, 2011.

On Bread & Poetry: A Panel Discussion with Gary Snyder, Lew Welch, & Philip Whalen. Ed. Donald Allen. Bolinas: Grey Fox Press, 1977.

The Paris Review Interviews. Vol. I. Ed. Philip Gourevitch. New York: Picador, 2006. [interviews with T.S. Eliot, Elizabeth Bishop, Dorothy Parker, Borges, Jack Gilbert, and others.]

The Paris Review Interviews. Vol. II. Ed. Philip Gourevitch. New York: Picador, 2007. [interviews with Robert Lowell, Philip Larkin, Harold Bloom, and others.]

The Paris Review Interviews. Vol. III. Ed. Philip Gourevitch. New York: Picador, 2008. [interviews with William Carlos Williams, Ted Hughes, Raymond Carver, Chinua Achebe, and others.]

The Paris Review Interviews. Vol. IV. Ed. Philip Gourevitch. New York: Picador, 2009. [interviews with Marianne Moore, Ezra Pound, Kerouac, Ashbery, Angelou, Stephen Sondheim, and others.]

Poetry and Poetics in a New Millennium. Ed. Edward Foster. Jersey City, NJ: Talisman House, 2000. [including interviews with: Clark Coolidge, Theodore Enslin, Michael Heller, Eileen Myles, Alice Notley, Maureen Owen, Ron Padgett, Armand Schwerner, Anne Waldman, and Lewis Warsh.]

Poetry In Person: Twenty-five Years of Conversations with America’s Poets. Ed. Alexander Neubauer. New York: Knopf, 2010. [Including: Kumin, Hass, Rukeyser, Philip Levine, Gluck, June Jordan, James Merrill, Hacker, Kinnell, Walcott, Clampitt, Clifton, Plumly, C.K. Williams, Peaco*ck, Pinsky, Hirsch, Bidart, Matthews, Muldoon, Li-Young Lee, Simic, Grennan]

Poets at Work: The Paris Review Interviews. Ed. George Plimpton. New York: Penguin Books, 1989. [including interviews with: Robert Penn Warren, Eliot, Frost, Moore, Lowell, Pound, Williams, Ginsberg, Aiken, Sexton, Auden, Macleish, Dickey, Bishop, Ashbery, Robert Fitzgerald.]

The Poet’s Craft: Interviews from The New York Quarterly. Ed. William Packard. New York: Paragon House, 1987. [Interviews with Auden, Blackburn, Sexton, Kunitz, Ginsberg, Levertov, Kinnell, Ashbery, Dickey, Rukeyser, Wilbur, Creeley, Jong, Wakoski, Snodgrass, Swenson, Eberhart, Adam, Snyder, Warren, Karl Shapiro, Baraka, Bukowski, Connellan, Michael Moriarty]

Postmodern Poetry: The Talisman Interviews. Ed. Edward Foster. Hoboken: Talisman House, 1994. [Interviews with Bronk, Coolidge, Hollo, Susan Howe, Mackey, Notley, Padgett, Scalapino, Sobin, Rosmarie Waldrop, Yau]

The Sighted Singer: Two Works on Poetry for Readers and Writers. Allen Grossman with Mark Halliday. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1992. [book-length conversation]

Sixty Morning Talks. Ed. Andy Fitch. Brooklyn: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014. [Conversations withEric Baus, Dan Beachy-Quick, Amaranth Borsuk, Brandon Brown, Julie Carr, Heather Christle, Shanna Compton, Joel Craig, Thom Donovan, Rachel Blau Duplessis, Forrest Gander & John Kinsella, Rob Halpern, Jen Hofer, Cathy Park Hong, Bhanu Kapil, Sophia Kartsonis & Cynthia Arrieu-King, Wayne Koestenbaum, Doroteha Lasky, Tan Lin, Stephen Motika, Amanda Nadelberg, Hoa Nguyen, Travis Ortiz, Danielle Pafunda, Caryl Pagel, Emily Pettit, Vanessa Place, Srikanth Reddy, Evelyn Reilly, Andrea Rexilius, Frances Richard, Lisa Robertson, Chris Schmidt, Zachary Schomburg, Leonard Schwartz, Lytle Shaw, Brandon Shimoda, Evie Shockley, Eleni Sikelianos, Dale Smith, Rod Smith & Cole Swensen, Juliana Spahr, Brian Kim Stefans, Gary Sullivan, Cole Swensen, Catherine Taylor, Daniel Tiffany, Monica de la Torre, Nick Twemlow, Chris Vitiello, Dana Ward, Laura Wetherington, Tyrone Williams, Ronaldo V. Wilson, Matvei Yankelevich, & Jenny Zhang]

The Sullen Art: Interviews by David Ossman with modern American Poets. Ed. David Ossman. New York: Corinth Books, 1963. [Interviews with Rexroth, Carroll, Blackburn, Rothenberg, Kelly, Bly, John Logan, Sorrentino, Creeley, Merwin, Levertov, LeRoi Jones, Dorn, Ginsberg]

Talking Poetry: Conversations in the Workshop with Contemporary Poets. Ed. Lee Bartlett. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1987. [including: Coolidge, Enslin, Eshleman, Everson, Gunn, Irby, Michael Palmer, Raworth, Ishmael Reed, Rodefer, Tarn, Wakoski, and Waldman.]

Tongues of Fallen Angels. Ed. Selden Rodman. New York: New Directions, 1974. [Conversations with Borges, Frost, Hemingway, Neruda, Kunitz, Marquez, Paz, Mailer, Ginsberg, Moraes, Neto, Walcott]

Towards a New American Poetics: Essays and Interviews. Ed. Ekbert Faas. Santa Barbara: Black Sparrow Press, 1979. [Essay on Olson, and interviews with Duncan, Snyder, Creeley, Bly, and Ginsberg]

The Verse Book of Interviews: 27 Poets on Language, Craft & Culture. Ed. Brian Henry and Andrew Zawacki. Amherst, MA: Verse Press, 2005. [including interviews with: Salamun, Charles Wright, Kleinzahler, Christine Hume & Laura Solomon, Dorn, Espada, McGuckian, Reginald Shepherd, Agha Shaid Ali, Rankine, Welish, Anselm Berrigan & Marcella Durand, Yau, Jarnot, Rohrer, Wier, Rumsey, Carrut, Holub, Ramsdell, Kinsella, fa*gan, Don Paterson, Kevin Hart, Debeljak.]

We Saw the Light: Conversations between the New American Cinema and Poetry. Daniel Kane. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2009. [interview with Lisa Jarnot, essays]

What Is Poetry: Conversations with the American Avant-Garde. Ed. Daniel Kane. New York: Teachers & Writers Books, 2003. [including conversations with: Ashbery, Armantrout, Creeley, Fanny Howe, Jarnot, Koch, Lauterbach, Mayer, Harryette Mullen, Palmer, Warsh, Welish.]

What’s Your Idea of a Good Time? Letters and Interviews 1977-1985. Bill Berkson and Bernadette Mayer. np: Tuumba Press, 2006. [book-length conversation]

Teaching & Writing Poetry
(Bibliography, Prompts, Terms, Forms, & Resources)

Bibliography

Poetry in and Out of the Classroom: Essays from the ACLS Elementary and Secondary Schools Teacher Curriculum Development Project. American Council of Learned Societies, 1995.

Addonizio, Kim. Ordinary Genius: A Guide for the Poet Within. New York: W. W. Norton, 2009.

--- and Dorianne Laux. The Poet’s Companion: A Guide to the Pleasures of Writing Poetry. New York: W. W. Norton, 1997.

Behn, Robin and Chase Twichell, Eds. The Practice of Poetry: Writing Exercises from Poets Who Teach. New York: Harper, 1992. [with essays/exercises by Lauterbach, Lux, Muske, Kumin, Dove, Waters, Lea, Christopher Davis, Mathis, Snively, Pettit, Waldman, Mitchell, Jackson, Linnea Johnson, McKean, Broughton, Spires, St. John, Stanton, Gilbert, Behn, Upton, Swander, Ullman, Hirsch, Wojahn, Hongo, Alexander, Digges, Klokker, Rosen, McPherson, Alberta Turner, Myers, Friebert, Simmerman, Weiss, Berstein, Mac Low, Dischell, McClatchy, Southwick, Maggie Anderson, Flint, Ostriker, Swenson, Dunn, Bryan, Myers, Gioia, Hudgins, Becker, Baumel, Peaco*ck, Shahid Ali, Rabbitt, Halpern, Matthews, McMahon, Twichell, Weingarten, Plumly, Tillinghast, Justice, Emanuel]

Bennett, Paula Bernat, Karen L. Kilcup, and Philipp Schweighauser, Eds. Teaching Nineteenth-Century American Poetry. New York: MLA, 2007.

Bunge, Nancy. Finding the Words: Conversations with Writers Who Teach. Athens, OH: Swallow Press, 1985. [Conversations with Marvin Bell, Kelly Cherry, Seymour Epstein, Allen Ginsberg, Clarence Major, Frederick Manfred, James Alan McPherson, N. Scott Momaday, Lisel Mueller, William Stafford, Wallace Stegner, Wakoski, Waldman, Weiss, Wilbur, Yglesias.]

Clark, Kevin. The Mind’s Eye: A Guide to Writing Poetry. New York: Pearson Longman, 2008.

Collom, Jack. Moving Windows: Evaluating the Poetry Children Write. New York: Teachers & Writers Collaborative, 1985.

Cooper, Patsy. When Stories Come to School: Telling, Writing, & Performing Stories in the Early Childhood Classroom. New York: Teachers & Writers Collaborative, 1993.

Cummins, Paul F. with Anna Cummins & Emily Cummins. Proceed with Passion: Engaging Students in Meaningful Education. Los Angeles: Red Hen Press, 2004.

Dobyns, Stephen. Best Words, Best Order: Essays on Poetry. New York: St. Martin’s Griffin, 1997.

Edgar, Christopher and Ron Padgett, Eds. Classics in the Classroom: Using Great Literature to Teach Writing. New York: Teachers & Writers Collaborative, 1999. [Essays on teaching Gilgamesh, Greek poetry, Sappho and Praxilla, Aristophanes, Psalms and Proverbs, Catullus, Beowulf, Rumi, Shakespeare, Hamlet, Basho, Keats, Shelley, von Kleist, Twain, Milton, Ovid, Diogenes, Homer, Hesiod, Bronte, Sophocles, Shakespeare, Kafka, Chaucer, and others. One essay by Sikelianos.]

---, Eds. Educating the Imagination: Essays & Ideas for Teachers & Writers, Volume One. New York: Teachers & Writers Collaborative, 1994. [Foreward by Joe Brainard, essays on writing poetry, fiction, and more]

---, Eds. Educating the Imagination: Essays & Ideas for Teachers & Writers, Volume Two. New York: Teachers & Writers Collaborative, 1994. [Essays on writing poetry, plays, across the curriculum, parody and humor, reading, and language by Julie Patton, Herbert Kohl, Ron Padgett, Bernadette Mayer, Bill Zavatsky, Maureen Owen, Towle, and “My High School English Teacher” essays by Ginsberg, Waldman, Holman, Hagedorn, Elmore Leonard, and others]

Edgar, Christopher and Susan Elson Wood. The Nearness of You: Students & Teachers Writing On-Line. New York: Teachers & Writers Collaborative, 1996. [Essay sections: “From the Computer Lab to the Internet,” “Students & Teachers,” “Writers On-Line,” “On-Line Writing Projects,” “Telecommunications & Reform”]

fa*gin, Larry. The List Poem: A Guide to Teaching & Writing Catalog Verse. New York: Teachers & Writers Collaborative, 1991.

Hass, Robert. On Teaching Poetry. Berkeley: Bancroft Library, 2006. [20 pages]

Hermsen, Terry and Robert Fox, Eds. Teaching Writing from Writer’s Point of View. Urbana: National Council of Teachers of English, 1998.

Hillman, Brenda. Cracks in the Oracle Bone: Teaching Certain Contemporary Poems. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2008.

Hugo, Richard. The Triggering Town: Lectures and Essays on Poetry and Writing. New York: W.W. Norton, 1979.

Hunly, Tom. The Poetry Gymnasium: 94 Proven Exercises to Shape Your Best Verse. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland, 2011.

Kiteley, Brian. The 3 A.M. Epiphany: Uncommon Writing Exercises that Transform Your Fiction. Cincinnati: Writer’s Digest, 2005.

Koch, Kenneth. Rose, Where Did You Get That Red? New York: Vintage, 1990.

---. Wishes, Lies, and Dreams: Teaching Children to Write Poetry. New York: Harper & Row, 1970.

---. I Never Told Anybody: Teaching Poetry Writing to Old People. New York: Teachers & Writers Collaborative, 1997.

Kooser, Ted: The Poetry Home Repair Manual: Practical Advice for Beginning Poets. Lincoln, NE: Bison Books, 2007.

Kovacs, Edna. Writing Across Cultures: A Handbook on Writing Poetry & Lyrical Prose. Hillsboro, OR: Blue Heron, 1993.

Kowit, Steve. In the Palm of Your Hand: The Poet’s Portable Workshop. Gardiner, Maine: Tilbury House, 1995.

Lasky, Dorothea, Dominic Luxford, and Jesse Nathan. Open the Door: How to Excite Young People About Poetry. San Francisco: McSweeney's, 2013. [Essays by Jim Trelease, Matthea Harvy, Jack Collom, James Kass, Kenneth Koch, Ron Padgett, Theodore Roethke, Eileen Myles, Phillip Lopate, Jesse Nathan, Jordan Davis, William Stafford, Jimmy Santiago Baca, Karen Volkman, Dorothea Lasky, Dave Eggers, Bertha Rogers, Michael CIrelli, Amy Swauger, Martin Farawell, Terry Blackhawk, Megan McNamer, Terri Glass, Pamela Michael, Kevin Coval, Jeff Kass, Matt Mason, Andrew Ek, Patrick Oliver, Bob Holman, Robin Ragler, Susan Grigsby, Mimi Herman, Michael Dickman, Elizabeth Bradfield, Komunyakaa, Meghan and Liam O'Rourke, Buas, Mort, Dimitrov, Anthony McCann, Michael McGriff, Katie Ford, Zapruder, Deborah Landau, Christina Davis, Dara Wier, Travis Nichols, Laura Solomon, CAConrad, Vick Vertiz, Adam O'Riordan, Quraysh Ali Lansana, Georgia A. Popoff, Rebecca Lindenberg, Harriet Levin, Emilie Coulson, and Stephen Burt]

Martin, Anne. Reading Your Students: Their Writing & Their Selves. New York: Teachers & Writers, 1983.

Marzan, Julio. Luna, Luna: Creative Writing Ideas from Spanish, Latin American, and Latino Literature. New York: Teachers & Writers Collaborative, 1997. [Essays by Koch, Pmmy Vega, Espada, Alvarez, and others]

McEwen, Christian and Mark Statman. The Alphabet of the Trees: A Guide to Nature Writing. New York: Teachers & Writers Collaborative, 2000. [Essays by Snyder, Sharpe, Karwoska, Bruchac, Swope, Bader, Kim Stafford, Tallmadge, Oliver, Bash, Rabkin, Leslie, Roth, McEwen, Marshall, Masturzo, Zwinger, Duckworth, Wertsch, Morse, Harter, Higginson, Gregory, Clary, Collom, Hermsen, Galt, Vega, Gilmore, Peck.]

McGurl, Mark. The Program Era: Postwar Fiction and the Rise of Creative Writing. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2009.

Oliver, Mary. A Poetry Handbook. New York: Mariner Books, 1994.

---. Rules for the Dance: A Handbook for Writing and Reading Metrical Verse. New York: Mariner Books, 1998.

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Greek & Latin Terms to Spur Writing

Adynaton (Gr. “not possible”): A form of hyperbole, which involves the magnification of an event by reference to the impossible. “My love burns like a hundred suns.”

Amblysia (Gr. “blunting”): A device related to euphemism where language is reduced or modified by way of preparation for the announcement of something tragic or alarming (“Are you sitting down?”).

Anaphora (Gr. “carrying up or back”): Rhetorical device involving repetition of a word or group of words in successive clauses. Write twenty lines beginning with the same word or phrase like Allen Ginsberg’s “America” or like Charles Wright’s ‘The Dead…” Try it with a question phrase like “Who could….” or a slightly awkward phrase like “We, who…”

Anacoluthon (Gr. “lacking sequence”): Beginning a sentence one way and finishing it in another.

Anadiplosis (Gr. “doubling”): Repetition of the last word of one clause at the beginning of the following clause to gain a special effect. “The keys shone is the yellow moonlight brightly. Brightly they looked into each other’s palm lines.”

Antanaclasis (Gr. “breaking back against”): A figurative device in which a word is used twice or more in two or more of its possible senses. When Othello is about to murder Desdemona, he says: “Put out the light, and then put out the light”—referring to both candle and the murder.

Anthimeria (Gr. “anthos” flower + “meros” part): The substitution of one part of speech for another. “The cloud beetled across the horizon.”

Asyndeton (Gr. “unconnected”): A rhetorical device where conjunctions, articles and even pronouns are omitted for the sake of speed an economy. Write 5 single long lines. Then remove as much as you can—in terms of asyndeton—in the rewriting of them.

Chiasmus (Gr. “placing crosswise”): Reversal of grammatical structures in successive phrases or clauses. Dr. Johnson: “By the day the frolic, and the dance by night.”

Hyperbaton (Gr. “overstepping”): Figure of speech where words are transposed from their usual order. “The flowers pink sat lovely on their stems, greenly.”

Hypotaxis poem. Write a poem in one long (100 word at least) single sentence—full of images, metaphors, and sensory details—that does not tell a story and leaps thing to thing almost dreamlike.

Irony: The two basic kinds of irony are verbal irony and irony of situation…At its simplest, verbal irony involves saying what one does not mean…At their very crudest: “I haven’t seen you for ages,’ from one man to another when they meet every day. Situational irony occurs when, for instance, a man is laughing uproariously at the misfortune of another even while the same misfortune, unbeknownst, is happening to him.”

Metaphor (Gr. “Carrying from one place to another”): A figure of speech in which one thing is described in terms of another. The comparison is usually implicit; whereas, in Simile, the comparison is usually explicit.

Metonymy (Gr. “name change”): Figure of speech in which a name or attribute of a thing is substituted for the thing itself. “The bench” for the judiciary. “I’ve read Dante” for his “works.” “I pledge allegiance to the flag.”

Parataxis poem. Write a poem of discreet individual objects and images—unrelated to each other and without any relationship state—just one thing after another.

Simile (from L., “similis” or like): A figure of speech in which one thing is likened to another, in such a way as to clarify and enhance an image. It is an explicit comparison (as opposed to the metaphor, where the comparison is implicit) recognizable by the use of the words ‘like’ or ‘as.’ Write ten of these.

Synathroesmus: An accumulation of words of different meaning.

“He was a sordid, bird-loving, blonde, fastidious, and beach-combing fellow.”

Synecdoche (Gr. “Taking up together”): Figure of speech where part stands for whole. “His dad bought him a new set of wheels.” (perhaps?): “Can you give me a hand?” “Lend me your ear”—but these could easily be metonymy, too.

Tmesis (Gr. “a cutting”): The separation of the parts of a word by the insertion of another word or words. Not unusual in abusive speech. E.g., “Neverthebloodyless.”

Zeugma (Gr. “yoking, bonding”): Figure of speech in which the same word (verb or preposition) is applied to two others in different sense. Dickens: “Miss Bolo went home in a flood of tears and a sedan chair.” “George went fishing this weekend and caught three salmon and a cold.”

Content-Based Writing Prompts

All Things poem. “Write a poem about all the things you’ve written poems about, or that you would like to write poems about. If you like, you can start every line with ‘I like to write about’ or ‘I would like to write about’.” For reference, see Robert Herrick’s poem “The Argument of His Book” (Koch’s Rose 37).

Animal poem. “When you can’t write, try writing about an animal.” (via Digges—and before that Levis from Levine-- in The Practice of Poetry 97.)

Apology poem. Write a poem where “you are apologizing for something you’re really secretly glad you did.” Refer to William Carlos Williams’s poem “This is Just to Say.” (Koch’s Rose 100).

Autobiographical poem. Write about a real memory in three different forms: in prose with metaphors and details; in three line stanzas; and in three words per line.

Blackbird poem. “Write a poem in which you talk about the same thing in a number of different ways.” Try to break it into Thirteen separate, numbered parts. Refer to Wallace Stevens’s poem “Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird.” (Koch’s Rose 86).

Black Sheep poem. “Write a poem about or from the voice of someone who has been cast out or has voluntarily left the family: the drunkard, the thief, or the perpetrator of the otherwise unforgivable.” (From Rosen in The Practice of Poetry 101.)

Break-up poem. Write a poem about a break-up, real or imagined.

Childhood Memory Poem. Write a poem about a single memory from your childhood. (Adapted from Kowit 17)

Cinema poem. Write while watching an old movie with the sound off. Write random lines throughout. Rearrange them and work them into a poem when the film’s over.

Cliché poem. Write a poem entirely of clichés, then re-write each line entirely.

City poem. Write a poem to city that you know well. Try to mine it for every detail you love and hate about it. It’s not a postcard, it’s a version of your city as you see it—in all its richness, complexity, and contradiction.

Comic poem. Try writing a poem designed to make us out loud. Think of silly, awkward, hilarious, embarrassing details, images, characters, and stories. Surprise is key here.

Comparison poem. “Write a poem in which you compare deep and serious feelings to things in science and math. If you like, put one of these comparisons in every line. Or you can devote the whole poem to one or two comparisons.” For reference, see John Donne’s poem “A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning.” (Koch’s Rose 50.)

Cut-up Expansure poem. Cut up a bunch of lines from various sources, then write your own lines between those words, lines, and sentences. (Adapted from Waldman in The Practice of Poetry 123.)

Danger poem. Write a poem about the last time you were in any kind of danger—real or imagined. Try to write it in a single heavily enjambed stanza. Adapted from Clark’s Mind’s Eye 90.

Desire poem. Write a poem rooted in desire—every line (say ten) should reflect different kinds of longing, wanting, hunger, craving, and thirst.

Double story poem. Write a poem where two very different stories are told, but each line alternates between them without explanation. Adapted from Clark’s Mind’s Eye 119.

Dramatic Monologue poem. “Write a dramatic monologue (a poem spoken in a voice other than your own)...Perhaps you should say some things you’d never allow yourself to say in one of your own poems.” (from St. John in The Practice of Poetry 63.)

Dream poem. Write about an old dream that’s haunted you. Don’t indicate that it’s a dream. Try to write it clearly in simple lines. (Adapted from Kowit 86.)

Dream Litany poem. Write a poem that begins with the line “I dreamed” and write ten lines. (from Koch’s Wishes 128.)

Earliest Memory poem. “Write a poem describing your earliest memory, using sensory, concrete language only.” From Clark’s Mind’s Eye 90.

Eavesdropper poem. Go to a public place (bus depot, tavern, café, diner, mall, etc.) and write down at least ten overheard things. Then assemble a poem from that language. Adapted from Clark’s Mind’s Eye 106.

Ekphrastic poem. Write a poem in conversation with a piece of visual art like a painting. Describe it, speak to it, and let it speak.

Encounter poem. Write a poem where the speaker encounters something for the first time—a new food, animal, town, mode of transport, activity, etc. Refer to D.H. Lawrence’s poem “The Snake.”

Enemy poem. Like the friend poem, but directed at an enemy. Go for direct address, and detail.

Epic Compressed. Write an entire epic poem—huge shifts in time, location, action, characters—in 15 lines.

Fable poem. Write a poem about a literal experience but turn it into a fable.

Fairy Tale poem. Find an old fairy tale—ideally from another time and from another culture, such as from Grimm’s Fairy Tales—and re-write your own version of it.

Family Secret poem. Framed by a single anecdote, with just 3-4 details of the secret. (Adapted from Kowit 19.)

Fear poem. “Write a poem that scares you.” (from McPherson in The Practice of Poetry 104.)

Five-senses poem. Write a poem that uses all five senses—one in each line, twice each for ten lines. Adapted from Clark’s Mind’s Eye 38.

Friend poem. Write a poem directed at a real friend about your friendship. Use the most specific, familiar language they would recognize immediately as well as details, memories, etc.

Future poem. Write a poem set in the future—either next year, in 2046, or in the year 3000.

Internal Rhyme poem. Write a poem that relies heavily on internal rhyme instead of end rhyme. Think associatively and follow the sound patterns with less regard for meaning than normal. Adapted from Clark’s Mind’s Eye 38.

Inventory poem. Like Whitman, try to assemble a great list of familiar and unfamiliar things in your poem—apostrophize to them, call on them, name them, describe them, speak to them. (Adapted from Kowit 233).

Invitation poem. Write “a poem in which you invite people (or only one person if you wish) to a magical beautiful place full of sounds and colors, and where all kinds of marvelous things may happen.” (Koch’s Rose 62).

Journey poem. Write a poem where you take a trip and end up in a totally unexpected place, town, planet, or setting. Adapted from Clark’s Mind’s Eye 91.

Kitchen poem. “Write a poem about your mother’s kitchen.” (From Dove in The Practice of Poetry 89.)

Liar’s poem. Write a poem comprised entirely of untrue statements. (Adapted from Koch’s Wishes 50, 198.)

Locust Tree poem. Write a poem that uses a single word on each line to describe something—a person, a town, a car wreck, a field—in a disjointed way. Refer to William Carlos Williams’s “The Locust Tree in Flower.” (Koch’s Rose 101).

Lorca Place Poem. “Write a poem about a beautiful, strange place which is full of colors.” Refer to Lorca’s poem “Arbole, Arbole.” (Koch’s Rose 133).

Love poem. Try to write a poem about romantic love that does not rely on sentimentality, cliché, or melodrama.

Magical realism poem. Write a poem that seems grounded in reality, but where impossible things begin to happen—that are understood as normal in the poem. Adapted from Clark’s Mind’s Eye 165.

Metaphor poem. Write a poem entirely composed out of various metaphors. See Padgett’s Handbook 112.

Momento Mori. Write a short poem where you are reminded of your own mortality. Try to avoid any direct statement of death; see if it can be invoked. (Adapted from Kowit 223).

Motif poem. “Write a poem in which an element (a phrase, a motif, a particular kind of diction, etc.) is returned to several times in the course of the poem.” Dunn in The Practice of Poetry 104.

Myth poem. Write a poem drawn on an ancient myth, but rewrite it from another perspective, being liberal with details.

Narrative poem. “Write a poem, eleven to fifteen lines long, in which you tell a story.” Flint in The Practice of Poetry 164.

Natural poem. Harder than it sounds: compose a poem made up of only natural objects—nothing human made at all.

Object poem. Begin with a familiar or unfamiliar object. Focus on it; study it. Begin to write about this object very carefully, clearly, metaphorically, obliquely.

Object / Action poem. “Write a poem in which you include approximately one object and one action per line….don’t worry about connecting one line logically to the next.” From Southwick in The Practice of Poetry 158.

Quotidian Reflection poem. Write a detailed, descriptive poem about something you do all the time—looking for your keys to flossing. Write about it in clinical detail. See what sort of metaphors and sensory details can emerge. (Adapted from Kowit 242).

Reality bending poem. Begin a poem with four or five reality-based lines. Slowly start to unhinge the real from the world of your poem through surreal description, metaphor, and other modes. (Adapted from Kowit 127).

Related poems. Write a group of poems related to each other in form, or content, or both.” From Anderson in The Practice of Poetry 160.

Rewrite poem. Return to a draft, an incomplete exercise and begin it again by rewriting every word, every line and see where it takes you. (Adapted from Kowit 47).

River poem. “Write a poem with a different river in each line.” Refer to Ashbery’s poem “Into the Dusk-Charged Air.” (Koch’s Rose 150).

Secret poem. Write a poem in which you reveal something to yourself, about yourself, that you have never told anybody. Begin with that line.

Seduction poem. “Write a ‘seduction poem’, in tetrameter couplets, in a modern voice.” From Ostriker in The Practice of Poetry 169.

Seeming poem. Write a poem alternating between the “I seem to be / but now I am” construction. (Koch’s Wishes 256.)

Special Power poem. Imagine that you have a special power and “write a poem in which, in a boasting, generous, and secret-telling kind of way, [you] offer to share these secrets. Refer to Walt Whitman’s poem “Song of Myself.” (Koch’s Rose 74).

Swan of Bees poem. Write a poem that has a construction like “swan of bees” or “blackboard of dreams” or “window of kisses” in every line. (Koch’s Wishes 155.)

Tell poem. Write a poem comprised entirely of short “tell” statements, with as little showing as possible to see where it leads you.

Thing poem. Write a poem from the perspective of an inanimate object—like a cigarette, a truck tire, a whisky glass, or the door knob of a castle. (Koch’s Wishes 270.)

TV poem. Write a poem while the sound is off, and switch the channel if you get stuck. Adapted from Clark’s Mind’s Eye 24.

Two-line poem. Write a two-line poem like Pound’s famous “In a Station of the Metro” where two distinct images are paired. Adapted from Clark’s Mind’s Eye 24 and 36.

Tyger poem. “Write a poem in which you are talking to a beautiful and mysterious creature and you can ask it anything you want—anything. You have the power to do this because you can speak its secret language” Refer to William Blake’s poem “The Tyger” (Koch’s Rose 6).

Unrelated Objects poem. Find several unrelated objects. “Write a poem describing the room from which these objects come.” (Pamela Alexander in The Practice of Poetry 96.)

Used to poem. Write a poem with the construction “I used to / but now” and repeat this, vary it, expand it. (Koch’s Wishes 174.)

Variegated Terrain poem. Write a poem of fifteen lines, where each relies on a specific emotion (otherwise unstated), like switching from jealousy to sorrow to fury to joy to confusion to hilarity to dread to curiosity to silliness and so on.

Voyelle poem. “Write a poem in which in every line you give the color of a vowel and also mention a few things which have that color. If you like, you can say that these things are the origin of the colors and of the vowels.” See Rimbaud’s poem “Voyelles” for reference. (Koch’s Rose 163).

Formal Writing Prompts

Aerated poem. “Try writing a poem that employs much ‘open’ or white space throughout.” Adapted from Clark’s Mind’s Eye 150.

Alternating line lengths. Write a poem with long lines, then short, long, then short. Vary these greatly. Look at Anne Carson’s Autobiography of Red for example. Also see Hudgins in The Practice of Poetry 189.)

Anapestic Dimeter. Try writing a six-syllable line (with the stresses on the third and the sixth syllable) for 20 lines.

Automatic poem. Write without taking the pen from the page (or your fingers from the keys) for fifteen minutes. Follow any passing thought or distraction, bring it into the writing. Let it get weird. Put that piece away for a day or two, then return to it and pluck out a line that resonates to begin a poem.

Beginning with another poem. Take a poem that’s new to you that you like (e.g., Rimbaud, Lorca, Mandelstam). Pluck out a good line from the middle of that poem, and begin a poem with that line as your first line.

Between-the-Lines poem. Take a poem new to you that is dense and strange. Type out the poem triple-spaced and print it out. Then write your own lines between the lines of the extant poem. Once you are finished, cross out or delete the original poet’s lines and rework your own lines into a poem. (Adapted from McClatchy in The Practice of Poetry 155.)

Break poem. “Write a poem in which some major change (in style or content) occurs across a stanza break. The poem should not explicate or comment on the change: it should rather absorb or reflect it.” (From Alexander in The Practice of Poetry 147.)

Chance poem. Open up the dictionary. Choose out 10 words at random. Write a poem with those ten words. (Adapted from Kowit 118).

Choriambic Sonnet. A sixteen-syllable line (‘—’) in an octave and sestet.

Contradiction poem. Take a line from a poem new to you that is a statement. Use that line as a first line and begin your poem as a contradiction or refutation of that poem. Adapted from Gilbert in The Practice of Poetry 148.

Construction poem. “Write a poem in which you literally build and/or take apart something for your reader.” (From Digges in The Practice of Poetry 139.)

Dactylic Trimeter poem. Try to write ten lines: 9 syllables a line (3, with the stress falling on the first, fourth, and seventh syllables of each line). Unrhymed. Also try Dactylic Hexameter if you’re feeling ambitious.

Dialogue poem. Write a poem in two voices—this could be in direct conversation or this could be two voices that cannot actually hear each other. See how distinct you can make them.

Emulation poem. Write a poem in the style and voice (but your own words) of another poem, say by Creeley, Niedecker, Ashbery, or Shakespeare. This could be a poem you know well and love, but is probably better if it’s a poem new to you in a style you’re unfamiliar with.

Extended Metaphor poem. Write a poem comprised entirely of an extended metaphor. See if you can generate 15 lines.

Expansure poem. The opposite of an erasure (see below), this is a poem where you take a small bit of found text (like a road sign, or a text message) and expand around it—grow it way it into something radically different than what the original says.

Future tense poem. Write a poem that relies only on future tense verbs.

Iambic Tetrameter. Dickinson loved varying this meter (with Iambic trimeter) so try it for sixteen lines.

Index /Table of Contents poem. Write a fake (or mock) index or Table of Contents for an imagined book. From Upton in The Practice of Poetry 129.

Kunin poem. Write a poem of five syllables per line, in three five line stanzas. Refer to Aaron Kunin’s book Folding Ruler Star.

List poem. This could be about loves, losses, meals, cities, those you’ve known who’ve passed away. See Padgett’s Handbook 100.

Implement/Surface poem. Write a poem with a different implement than you’re used to (a magic marker, a sharpee, a colored pencil, etc.) and find a surface that’s large to write on (like a dry erase board in a classroom or cut out grocery bag, cut open a shoe box).

Midwinter Day Poem. Write a single poem, all throughout a single day. Try to get as much as humanly possible of your lived reality (passing thoughts, changes in light and weather, interruptions, unlikely connections, ramblings) as possible. Refer to Bernadette Mayer’s book Midwinter Day.

Most Common Words Poem. Write a poem comprised only of the most common words in English: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Most_common_words_in_English

Negation poem. Write a poem with only negative statements (e.g., “I lost all my nickels, there was no moon, and the stars had been evaporated by the sun which had gone missing in the absent sky”).

Noise poem. Write a poem that imitates a single sound and try to imitate it differently in each line—expand on it, contradict it, follow it to other sounds, metaphors, sensory details. (Adapted from Koch’s Wishes 126.)

Opposite poems. “Choose a pair of words with opposite or nearly opposite meanings…Write a poem titled and based upon each of the words you have chosen.” (from Dischell in The Practice of Poetry 143.)

Photograph poem. Find two photographs: one new to you and one that’s familiar. Write a poem drawing from the images in both. (Adapted from Kowit 100).

Poemfilm. Make a short movie (on iMovie for instance) of found footage or footage you’ve filmed—and edit it together with either your text (subtitled) or your voice over narration.

Prose poem. Use just five complete sentences, unrelated to one another.

Question poem. Write a poem comprised entirely of questions. Be specific, leap around, and ask yes/no questions as well as open-ended questions.

Q&A poem. Write a question and then answer it in the poem in multiple—even contradictory ways. (Adapted from Smith 111.)

Quotation poem. Find a quotation old or new, but unrelated to poetry. Use that as your epigraph and write a poem beneath it that does not refer to the quotation directly. Adapted from Clark’s Mind’s Eye 105.

Ransom Note poem. Cut letters out of a new paper, junk mail, or magazines. Reassemble a poem in the form of a ransom note, letter by letter. (Adapted from Kowit 110).

Recorded poem. Record yourself speaking a poem as you improvise it. Then Transcribe and expand it.

Serial poem. Write a poem broken into sections (numbered parts, for example) or create your own new way of dividing the poem’s discrete parts up.

Syllabic Poem. Write a rhymed poem of ten lines, alternating 9 and 7 syllables per line. (Adapted from Kowit 179).

Transliteration. Find a poem in a language you do not read or speak. Do an incorrect poetic translation of that poem—however roughly or oddly—into your own English, without any regard for what the original poem means, working only on what the words might sound like in English.

Trochaic Tetrameter. Write ten lines, with 8 syllables a line, but using only a trochaic (stress, unstressed) meter.

Unpunctuated poem. Write a poem in 20 lines without any punctuation. Adapted from Clark’s Mind’s Eye 52.

Walk Poem. Go for a walk with a notebook and pen. Stop every so often to write lines mid-walk. Let details, scents, passing thoughts, and any overheard sound or speech come in. See Padgett’s Handbook 200.

Wish poem. Write a poem which begins, varyingly, with I wish, and, and Sometimes. (From Koch’s Wishes 13).

Traditional Poetry Forms

Acrostic. Write a twenty-six line poem, each line beginning with each letter of the alphabet. See Padgett’s Handbook (4) for variations.

Anglo-Saxon Lines. See Baumel in The Practice of Poetry 193.

Aubade. Write a poem about leaving one you love after you’ve spent the night together.

Ballad. Write a rhyming poem in quatrains that tells a story in an ABAB scheme. See Padgett’s Handbook 18 and 73 in Strand and Boland’s Making of a Poem.

Blank Verse Poem. Write 20 lines, ten syllables per line, each with about 5 stresses per line—unrhymed. See Padgett’s Handbook 25 and 101 in Strand and Boland’s Making of a Poem.

Calligram. Write a poem in the shape of the thing it describes, like a building, a swimming pool, a watermelon, or a platypus. See Padgett’s Handbook 34.

Cantos. Write a poem in five or ten sections, called cantos. These can be different angles, perspectives, stages, or stories—each one a separate “canto” in the greater poem. See Padgett’s Handbook 38.

Canzone. Design a rhyming, patterned form (like 15 lines of iambic hexameter, rhyming ABAB) and write a poem about a big topic: love, injustice, cruelty, beauty, etc. See Padgett’s Handbook 40.

Chant. Write a poem meant to be said aloud and repeated—think of work songs, drinking songs, protests, and spells. See Padgett’s Handbook 45.

Cento. Take at least five lines from five other poets’ poems and arrange them into a poem. See Padgett’s Handbook 45.

Cinquain. Write a five-line poem with two, four, six, eight, and then two syllables. See Padgett’s Handbook 49.

Collaboration. Write a poem of 25 lines with another person. Experiment with trading lines, sentences, trading words, and even letters. See Padgett’s Handbook 51.

Concrete Poem. Write a poem that tries to embody what it refers to—whether physical or abstract. Consider sound and typography, and try to match what the poem says with how it says so on the page. See Padgett’s Handbook 53.

Eclogue. Write a poem in the style of a monologue celebrating something (often natural) and which attempts to convince the reader of its value. See Padgett’s Handbook 60.

Elegy. “Song of mourning.” This poem is to communicate the sadness of a death and is also to commemorate a loved one. See Padgett’s Handbook 62 and 167 in Strand and Boland’s Making of a Poem.

Epic. The biggest, most vast and all-encompassing poem we know: Homer, Byron, and Virgil wrote these and Pound, Williams, Waldman, and Notley reinvented them. See Padgett’s Handbook 65.

Epigram. Write a short one or two line poem meant as a pithy bit of wisdom—austere or playful. See Padgett’s Handbook 67.

Epistle. Write a poem in the form of a letter. Refer to Li Po’s “The River Merchant’s Wife: A Letter” translated by Ezra Pound. See Padgett’s Handbook 69.

Epitaph. Poem written “on a tomb” to commemorate the dead. See Padgett’s Handbook 71.

Epithalamium. Write a poem celebrating a marriage. This could be literal or parodic, real or imagined. See Padgett’s Handbook 73.

Erasure. Photocopy a page out of a dictionary, encyclopedia, old science text book, etc., and erase (black out, white out, scribble over, whatever) 90% of the words that you don’t need in order to reveal a poem beneath. Refer to Tom Philips’s A Humument.

Event poem. Write down a numbered list of steps involving people and objects and animals and tools—as though this was a list of instructions actors would perform for an audience. See Padgett’s Handbook 74.

Found poem. Like Duchamp’s urinal, the found poem is an entire work unto itself which might be thought of as a poem in a new context: this could be a billboard, an old advertisem*nt, a text message from your mother, or a receipt from the tailor. See Padgett’s Handbook 79.

Fragment. Write a fragmented poem in the shape of Sappho’s fragments using the whole page. See Anne Carson’s Sappho translation If Not, Winter.

Ghazal. Try to write 5-12 couplets, all sharing the same rhyme, and put your actual name in the final line. See Padgett’s Handbook 84 for variations and Ali in The Practice of Poetry 205.

Haibun. Write a poem that alternates between prose description and then haiku. See Basho’s Narrow Road to the Deep Interior.

Haiku. Write 10 haiku (3 line stanza: 5 syllables, 7 syllables, 5 syllables). See Padgett’s Handbook 86.

Heroic Couplets. Write five iambic pentameter and end rhyming couplets. See 121 in Strand and Boland’s Making of a Poem.

Invective Poem. Write a poem full of disdain and vituperation. Catullus was a master of these. Also see Padgett’s Handbook (91) for “insult poetry.”

Limerick. Write 5-line poem where the 1st, 2nd, and 5th lines have three stresses each and rhyme with one another, and the 3rd and 4th lines have two stresses each and rhyme with one another. See Padgett’s Handbook 94.

Lune. Write this Americanized version of the Haiku. Three lines: 3 syllables, 5 syllables, 3 syllables. See Padgett’s Handbook 103. Try writing 10 of them.

Nonsense poem. Write a poem that makes as little sense as possible. See Padgett’s Handbook 115.

Ode. Write an ode on an abstract concept (like lying or silliness), an occasion (a celebration or holiday), or on an object (like Keat’s Grecian Urn). See Padgett’s Handbook 118 and 240 in Strand and Boland’s Making of a Poem.

Ottava Rima. Write an 8 line stanza, where the rhyme is abababcc. See Padgett’s Handbook 124.

Pantoum. Write 6-10 quatrains with the repeating structure of lines according to the form. See Padgett’s Handbook 126, page 43 in Strand and Boland’s Making of a Poem, Baumel in The Practice of Poetry 198.

Pastoral. Write a poem depicting imaginary life in the wilderness. See Padgett’s Handbook 132 and 207 in Strand and Boland’s Making of a Poem.

Renga. Write a long, image-filled poem alternating between tercets and couplets. Try to write a total of 30 lines in this mode. See Padgett’s Handbook 148.

Satire. Take something people feel pious about and writing a poem that exposes the weaknesses of it in a biting, sardonic mode. See Padgett’s Handbook 163.

Sestina. Write a 7-stanza poem with six repeating and alternating end words. See Padgett’s Handbook 170 and 21 in Strand and Boland’s Making of a Poem.

Sonnet. Write 2 rhyming sonnets (Petrarchan and Shakespearean). See Padgett’s Handbook 178 and 55 in Strand and Boland’s Making of a Poem.

Syllabic Poem. Choose ten numbers at random (3, 9, 1, 2, 2, 12, etc.) and then use each of those numbers to determine the number of syllables in your lines, as in Marianne Moore’s poetry. See Padgett’s Handbook 185.

Tanka. Write a short, meditative five-line poem (2 syllables, 3 syllables, 2 syllables, 3 syllables, 3 syllables) See Padgett’s Handbook 187.

Terza Rima. Write a rhyming 15-line poem, in 5 stanzas of terza rima. See Padgett’s Handbook 192.

Triolet. Write an 8-line poem of a specific rhyme scheme, where the first line is repeated twice more. See Padgett’s Handbook 194.

Villanelle. Write a six stanza (five tercets and a quatrain) poem in rhyme. See Padgett’s Handbook 197, page 5 in Strand and Boland’s Making of a Poem, and Peaco*ck in The Practice of Poetry 200.

Additional Resources for Teaching Poetry

Beyond the brief 150 or so prompts, exercises, terms, and forms above, there are many other excellent ones. What follows are a few other resources for digging deeper.

There are terrific procedural poetry writing exercises in Scott Wiggerman and David Meischen’s Wingbeats book. See especially the following exercises:

Cyra S. Dumitru’s “The Mind’s Eye: Listening as Seeing” (47).

Abe Louise Young’s “Birds in the Classroom” (56).

Wendy Barker’s “A Crack in the Cup” (60).

Harryette Mullen’s “Emulating Walt Whitman” (101).

Naomi Shihab Nye’s “New Combinations: Nouns and Verbs” (119).

Susan Briante’s “Diction Translations” (153).

Rosa Alcalá’s “A Walking Petrarchan Sonnet” (167).

Andrea Hollander Budy’s “The Postcard Poem” (200).

Susan Terris’s “Seven (or Ten) Line Poem” (202).

Georgia Popoff’s “Tales from the Bathroom” (226).

Jane Hilberry’s “My Mother’s Clothes” (232).

Jenny Browne’s “Love Letter to a Stranger” (235).

Patricia Smith’s “Dressing” (241).

Oliver de la Paz’s “Rube Goldberg Poems” (265).

Ravi Shankar’s “A Manipulated Fourteen-Line Poem” (269).

Matthew Zapruder’s “Three-Day Defamiliarization” (273).

Lisa Russ Spaar’s “The Self Portrait Poem” (277).

Hoa Nguyen’s “Mind is Shapely” (284).

William Wenthe’s “Stretching the Sentence” (288).

***

Scott Wiggerman and David Meischen have released a second volume of "Excercises and Practice in Poetry" in Wingbeats II. This is another amazing trove of nearly 350 more pages of excercises by a very diverse group of poets. Further, they include two useful tables of content to help you find appropriate excercises. See especially:

Sandra Soli's "Getting Unstuck: Ten Warm-Ups" (5).

Farid Matuk's "Soundscape Poems" (64).

Lee Ann Roripaugh's "Poetry Superpowers vs. Poetry Kryptonite" (104).

Ada Limón's "The Echo: Same-Language Translation" (121).

Carmen Giménez Smith's "An Exercise in Derangement" (125).

Ching-In Chen's "Creating an Improvised Poetic Chorus" (139).

Honorée Fanonne Jeffers's "The Happy Blues Experiment" (210).

Cole Swensen's "A Different Dictionary" (263).

Kevin Prufer's "Braided Narrative" (311).

Sarah Vap's "Tessellation: Obsessing over Patterns" (318).

Kazim Ali's "Syllabus for a Seminar on Silence" (330).

***

Tom Hunley’s The Poetry Gymnasium is also replete with longer procedural exercises. Many draw on formal and familiar ideas, but there are 94 in all, broken into categories of “Invention,” Arrangement,” “Style,” “Memory,” and “Delivery”—that last section devoted to performing poems. One feature of the book is that beyond its detailed procedural instructions, Hunley has examples by published poets and by students who’ve tried the exercise. I’ve listed my sixteen favorites below:

Breaking the Rules (12)

Dialogue Balloons (14)

Hynagogic / Hypnopompic States (37)

Revision: Putting In (51)

Revision: Taking Out (61)

Prose Poem / Play (112)

Revised Forms (116)

Swivel Lines (128)

Bits and Fragments (141)

Changing Lanes Without Signaling (144)

Figure Eight (Schemes) (154)

Figure Eight (Tropes) (156)

Image Journals (165)

Multiple Metaphors (170)

Generating Unusual Metaphors (200)

A Blaze of Light in Every Word (218)

***

Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook also has a section called “Exercises/Praxis” featuring extended procedural poetry-writing exercises:

Rae Armantrout’s “The Ax” (91).

Evie Shockley’s “The Low-down on the Warm-up” (92).

Laynie Browne’s “On the Elasticity of the Sonnet…” (95).

Graham Foust’s “Teaching John Ashbery” (102).

Catherine Wagner’s Six S’s” (105).

Noah Eli Gordon’s “The Baggage Switch” (107).

Brenda Hillman’s “The Holograph” (110).

Jen Hofer’s “Two Dozen English-to-English Translations…” (114).

Peter Streckfus’s “Three Questions” (117).

Rachel Zucker’s “Poetry as Translation & Radical Revision” (120).

Tony Trigilio’s “Doing Things in Silence” (123).

Christine Hume’s “Taking Poetry Out For an Essay” (126).

Bruce Beasley’s “The Oddity of Point Roberts” (129).

Sawako Nakayasu’s “Competitive Poetry: Kukai” (131).

Brian Henry’s “Teaching Writing Without Writing” (133).

Emily Rosko’s “The Complaint” (135).

Aimee Nezhukumatathil’s “The Poetry of Superstition and Supposition “ (138).

Martha Ronk’s “Obsession with Objects” (140).

Matthew Cooperman’s “Taking Readings / To Take Time” (143).

Oliver de la Paz’s “The Poetic Timeline…” (146).

Bhanu Kapil’s “Writing the Body” (149).

Michael Theune’s “Trust the Turn: Focusing the Revision Process…” (151).

K. Silem Mohammad’s “Impersonal Universe Deck (IUD) “ (153).

Sasha Steensen’s “Five Steps to the Five Minute Chapbook” (157).

Paul Hoover’s “A Wicker Swimmer: Straying Home” (161).

Dorothea Lasky’s “A Word is a Thing…” (166).

John Gallaher’s “The Manifest: an Idea with a Writing Prompt” (170).

Christina Mengert’s “Accessing Supra-Intelligence: Poetry and Intuition” (174).

Kazim Ali’s “Intentional Acts: Some Notes on The Heresy of…” (176).

***

Behn and Twichell’s The Practice of Poetry also has a section (in addition to dozens of terrific poetry-writing procedures) on revision. See especially:

Donald Justice’s “Of Revision” (249).

Lynn Emanuel’s “In Praise of Malice” (251).

Susan Snively’s “Waiting and Silence” (257).

***

For broader and even more theoretical approaches related to teaching poetry, Retallack and Spahr’s excellent Poetry And Pedagogy is full of excellent essays. The following are my favorites:

Alan Golding’s “Isn’t the Avant-Garde Always Pedagogical” (13).

Lynn Keller’s “FFFFFalling with Poetry” (30).

Charles Bernstein’s “The Difficult Poem” (148).

Lyn Hejinian’s “Stages of Encounter with a Difficult Text” (205).

Jena Osman’s “Gumshoe Poetry” (239).

Charles Bernstein’s “Creative Wreading: A Primer” (275).

Harryette Mullen’s “Between Jihad and McWorld: A Place for Poetry” (282).

***

Poets on Teaching also contains dozens of other reflective, theoretical, and uncategorizable pieces as well. A few of my favorites are Gridley (3), Reddy (7), Mobilio (9), Sikelianos (11), Swensen (15), Burt (18), Martin (26), Goldsmith (29), Gizzi (36), Silliman (40), Brown (50), Beachy-Quick (85), Gander (87), Jarnot (181), Spahr and Clover (184), McSweeney and Goransson (187), Sharma (214), Nguyen (229), Smith (249), Giscombe (285), Waldrep (303).

***

The most esoteric anthology of materials related to teaching poetry is probably Jane Sprague’s excellent Imaginary Syllabi. Favorites in there are Conrad (25), Lasky (31), Hoover (38), Mellis (80), Robinson (83), Zawacki (87), and Halpern (93).

***

Orr and Voigt’s Poets Teaching Poets is basically comprised of lectures by poets on various topics. Most of these are pretty bland, actually. Stand-outs: Hass (9), Gluck (23), Grossman (121), McHugh (207), and Hoagland (240)—though none deal with teaching particularly. They are more in the vein of talks and object lessons compiled from talks given at Warren Wilson College over the years.

***

The Judith Lee Stronach Memorial Lectures On the Teaching of Poetry: this a series of chapbooks or pamphlets published by the Bancroft Library at Berkeley (in editions of just 400). I’ve only read “On Teaching Poetry” by Robert Hass and Brenda Hillman’s “Cracks in the Oracle Bone”—and both are in the flavor of the essays in Poets Teaching Poets—but there are some jewels in there (Hass’s reading of some 17th Century haiku as a metaphor for teaching poetry, for instance) for those looking to dig a bit deeper. There are others in the series (Sharon Olds, Carl Phillips, et al.) that we haven’t yet read.

***

There aren’t many “classics” of creative writing pedagogy or how-to manuals, but I’ve listed three below that are used and cited widely: Pound’s ABC of Reading; Hugo’s Triggering Town; and Dobyns’s Best Words, Best Order. For good or bad, these three have made the rounds and are worth spending time with—especially Pound’s little volume, to which I return often when teaching introductory poetry courses.

***

For fiction writing exercises, I think Brian Kiteley’s The 3 A.M. Epiphany is excellent as it features more than 200 short, detailed assignments. After the success of this volume, Kiteley wrote a sequel called The 4 A.M. Breakthrough. And of course Raymond Queneau's Exercises in Style is masterful.

***

Now then. If you're somebody whose eyes brought you this far down, thanks for your interest. I hope you'll share this with those to whom it might be of use.
—JMW, Tucson, AZ | October 2014

Poetics Archive, Resources, & Pedagogy (2024)

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